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VinceLombardi

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VinceLombardi last won the day on January 12 2019

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  1. What is a pressing trap? Is that where you use pressure to force passes into certain areas of the pitch and then isolate the receiver of the pass to neutralize the attack? Edit: I just watched this video, and if that is what you mean by pressing traps, then they are entirely doable. I've been playing that sort of defensive system since FM16. I use it to get the opposition to come out of their half to give me space to attack into. You gotta play around with the pressing and marking instructions for both the team and players and really think about your defensive shape. I typically look to encourage the play wide to trap players on the sidelines. Or I let them advance the ball quickly into my half, isolating themselves from their support and then take away their backpass options so they cannot play any direction but forward into the teeth of my defense. Triggers look to be a bit harder, particularly the ones related to player actions, but for the ones that go into effect when the ball gets into certain zones, I imagine you can set a bit up by manipulating the LOE. Honestly I haven't tried, so not sure.
  2. Do you find the playmaker designation to be a hindrance when you play vs DM or double DM formations? I'm concerned the rest of the team will force passes that aren't really there. (They did in FM16)
  3. How would you compare these roles to their non-playmaking alternatives (eg. AMs/a, SS)? I've been looking to create a "central winger" role in the middle. Not sure where the term comes from, but I saw it on these forums in 2016-2018. Basically it's a central midfield role that's all about dribbling up the middle and carrying the ball into the final third. It's a hybrid creator/scorer that looks to attack the space between the central defenders to either lay on a pass to a forward or take the shot themselves. In FM16 I had good success with the AMC SS(a) and in FM18 by pushing it back MC and playing a CM(a) with dribble more, risky passes, etc. I have been playing an AMC SS(a) again here in FM21 and it's 90% of what I'm looking for, particularly in the buildup phase. But it doesn't find space in and around the box as well as it did in FM2016 and can get caught up in the defensive line with the STC players. Now that I've got the tactic near 100% where I want it, I'm coming back to tweak this role to see if I can get what I want. Any suggestions on where I might find what I'm looking for?
  4. My solution vs the Wide attackers has been: 1) push the Midfielders back to DM(s) with close down more, tackle harder, and hold position (both of them). 2) Set all 3 central defenders as CD(d) with close down less - which makes them play between a cover and defend duty. 3) Play a standard or low defensive line so that the CDs don't leave space behind them for the Wide players to exploit. 4) Prioritize physical attributes for central defenders, particularly jumping height and to a slightly lesser extent, pace. The net result is that the 3 CDs and 2 DMs play a very condensed central defense. The DMs play that stopper role and the CDs play the cover. The DM and Wide CDs don't hesitate to close down opposing wide players if/when the get behind my wide Midfielders. The above average jumping height on the CDs that stay back on the box neutralize any lofted crosses and the lower line leaves very little space for low crosses. What happens most often is that the opposing wide players get trapped up in the corner with the ball and no options to get rid of it. It's not really a dangerous position if they don't have anywhere to go with the ball. It typically just ends in them kicking the ball into the defender and out for a corner -- which my 3 CDs with great jumping height can handle no problem. The only thing that I really don't have an answer for is when they are aggressively pushing forward their FBs with the wide attackers. In that situation, I switch to a 4-4-1-1 and play a counter attacking system to take advantage of their aggressive wide players.
  5. The answer to this is using Wide Midfielder (Support) @13th Man has a good explanation of why in his career posts where he runs this sort of system. I run a 3-4-1-2 (with 2 DMs). I kept bouncing back and forth between Defensive Wingers and Wide Midfielders on the outside. Defensively they play more or less the same, but the Wide Midfielders have the customizable options that the Defensive Wingers don't.
  6. It shouldn't. Ball magnet/playmaker roles aren't as hard coded as they were in say '16. If you find it's a problem, just go with a DM(d) role.
  7. A Regista isn't really a "pivot" role. They tend to get too far up field. Pivots need to stay out of the thick of it and stay open for a safe backpass. My favorite double pivot is 2 DM(s) with "hold position". They both stay back and screen the defense while staying free to recycle possession. If you want to keep Lopez in the Regista role, flip him with Martinez and play Martinez as a DLP(d). With the IW(s) and AMC(s) there is not any space on the left for the Regista to exploit and run into. But on the right, the IW(a) gets forward more aggressively and will leave space behind him for the Regista. It will also help support him for through passes and similar.
  8. I think the best way to combat some of this is consider each step (eg. pass, dribble, etc) in an attack an opportunity to fail/make a mistake. With that mindset, your goal becomes to complete your attacks with as few moves, while maximizing the opponents moves to create a successful attack. Said another way, if you get a reasonable chance on goal with 3 passes and you opponent needs 10 passes and a dribble to get the same opportunity, you are going to have a lot more success -- especially in the lower leagues with players that can't do it all themselves. That all starts in the midfield and how you engage the opposing team in defense, and conversely taking everything the opponent offers you on offense moving the ball into an attacking position. It's really all about the middle third, imo. Edit: As a bit more on this and in line with the OP, I think a real key to making this work is individual evaluations of the players. There are some player's that you are going to start that are just going to be average or subaverage for your level. You don't want to ask too much of these players. Others are going to be stars for the level and can be counted on to perform regularly (even if they don't do it every game) -- like I did with Vecchia in that tactic. Finally there are players that are good at one thing. Like a CB with high heading & strength but poor pace. That player could be good or bad based on how you use them. If you push a high line and leave space behind, your asking to get burned. However if you play a lower line with a good screen in front to force more lofted passes, you may find that he can keep opposing strikers out of the game despite his lackluster overall star rating.
  9. I find it extremely helpful to have (a) pivot player(s) in the formation and a couple players to clean up loose balls that stay back out of the action and recycle possession. This gives a natural ebb and flow to attacking that will help draw out the defense and maintain space to attack with. For me, typically this is going to be 1-2 DMCs for the pivot and a wingback/fullback or two to clean up cleared balls. But just not committing all your players forward too fast and keeping a couple back so that attacks can reset themselves naturally is a huge help
  10. I largely agree with ExpDef. DLF(s) up top will help a lot and the AP(a) becomes either a CM(a) or Mez(a) depending on where you want him to bring pressure. I however like the BBM(s) as the other CM and would opt to make the DM a DLP(d). I think this is a case of different strokes for different folks. Either setup should get you a better possession tactic. I would play around with them to see what you and your players like.
  11. I play a hybrid pressing system, with a high line of engagement and a middle or low defensive line. Not sure if it's gegenpressing or not, but it does apply pressure with a low defensive line. I use team and player instructions to set the pressure to be higher with the midfield players in the formation and lower on the backside. Typically on team and instructions I will have "Mark tighter" and pressing ticked up 1 over middle. (Urgent?) I pair that with a higher line of engagement to get my advanced players involved early and a normal or even 1 tick lower than normal defensive line. TI for counter press is optional based on whether or not you feel the pressure is getting there quick enough. For PI, all my midfielders get pressing ticked up 1 and mark tighter, and tackle harder. Wide defenders too. CBs get pressing intensity ticked down one (to offset the TI). CBs may or may not get "mark tighter" based on how well the cover as overdoing it can have them beat by players with more athleticism. The end result is a defensive team that is aggressively pressing when the opposing team gets into the middle third, but still applies some pressure in opposing half. All without commiting the CBs to the pressing game, leaving them to hold their shape. The players who aren't applying pressure in the midfield find opposing midfielders to cover in their area. This forces opposing teams to hoof the ball to your waiting CBs, who are good in the air and can head it away. If it's something you want to check out, you can see the full instructions and a better explanation in the "American Football" threads.
  12. Really good set of posts, @Rashidi. When you look at a roster or a single player and put some thought into what they can do well (and what they can't), then you can really get them to perform above their "star rating". Sometimes I can't help but laugh at some of the posts where a coach is trying to play a certain style but none of their players are suitable to the vision. Like trying to force the square peg through the round hole. I just picked up FM21 and am playing a journeyman for this version. Started unemployed, and got picked up by IK Sirius, the bottom team in the Swedish Premier team, well on their way to relegation with 9 games to right the ship. Roster is junk. Not a single striker worth mention and one of the top 2 players is out, injured. Far and away, my player best available is Vecchia. Unfortunately, he is both the best creator and best scorer. This guy is going to need to do everything if we are going to make it. Well with no good strikers and my best scorer, creator, and player in a wide midfielder role, I needed to get a bit creative in my tactics. If there aren't any good strikers, then I'm not going to force it by playing one. I also need to scheme Vecchia into both scoring position and in position to get the ball early create for the team. I opt for a 4-6-0 strikerless formation that I had success with in FM16 because I dont have a striker worth putting on the field. Then, in order to get Vecchia into and around the box, I'm putting him into an IW(a) role so that he can be as dangerous as possible. Also because he already has the cut inside from left move, I'm opting for him at ML instead of MR. In order to give Vecchia space to work in and improve his matchup, I'm going to try to shift the defense away from him by using the Mez(a) out of the MCR. This will pull the opposing CDs away from my most dangerous player and match him more often against the opposing DR, which is a more favorable matchup. Its particularly favorable as Vecchia is going to be trying to beat the DR inside and that DR isn't going to have CD support. I play the AMC as a SS(a) with Roam from position so that he drifts into the space on the right side vacated by the Mez(a) and will get pushed there further by Vecchia coming inside. This will force the CD to travel with the AMC and stress the opposing team's shape. The MR needs to play a winger role to create space for the Mez(a) and pull the DR away from being able to mark out the Mez(a). This basically finishes the effect. We pull the entire defense to our right side. The MR winger pulls the DR. This forces the CD to step out to cover the Mez(a). And with the AMC on roam shifting right too, he is going to pull the only remaining CD defender. With all these players looking to get forward on the right side, we have the DR play a bit of a pivot role behind so that they can pass back if they need to. We can see it in action here: The ML (Vecchia) is moving inside with options of where to run into space. He can try to beat his man and run through the defense or across the face of the defense. Or he can use the space in front of the defense, and put in a pass to one of the 3 players on the right side that are all matchup one-on-one with only a single player to beat between them and the goal utilizing a Trips Deep passing concept. In this play, he opts a pass behind the defense, the Mez(a) beats his man, and we get a goal. Team went 5-0-4 to finish the season and stay up. Had 10 goals for, 5 goals against. After scoring 1 goal and no assists in the first 21 games of the season, Vecchia led the team with 5 goals and 3 assists in the final 9 games. Seriously, y'all. Take a bit of time to look over the roster. And do yourself a favor by building the tactic around the roster, rather than building the tactic despite the roster.
  13. Always happy to hear it's helping folk. I just started my first ever journeyman save. Normally I just stick to one team. Ended up at IK Sirius at the bottom of Swedish Premier with like 7 games left. Kept them up after a nice little run by playing a strikerless tactic I dusted off and revamped from FM16. Really a fan of the new match engine. A big step up from the rather tepid central play I was getting on FM19. I really think that there is a lot of room to be inventive in this ME and am looking forward to seeing how far these concepts can be utilized.
  14. I am actually. Just picked up 21. Really enjoying it. Glad to be of some help.
  15. It's really hard to transpose the positions between the two sports. The specialized nature of players in NFL doesn't translate well. But as to the question: Off Guard and Off Tackle are plays, not positions. It describes where the running back is running and who the lead blocker is. Just call them Guards and Tackles. Beside that, I would say that the names are appropriate. I can see where you were going with each one and can't say that any is inaccurate.
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