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Oakland Stomper

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About Oakland Stomper

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  1. West Brom Inspiration

    Johnny, I understand the tendency to want to play with a defensive or counter mentality, but that won't get to where we're trying to go. Bear in mind that I'm looking to replicate a style, as coached by Pulis and some others who I've mentioned that will not have much possession. When you do this vs. a like opponent, you will dominate the ball. Pulis does play VERY defensively on the road vs the big teams, and I would say that defensive is correct in these situations. I also think that he's mostly ditched the double pivot since the mid-point of last season, though they lined up in a really narrow formation in the last match of 2016/17 if memory serves. I that case the outside backs joined in the attack much more. In most situations I'd say that they act as FB(s) now. Back to mentality/shape/TI's/PI's, I won't have much chance to tinker until the weekend, but I'm leaning toward Control/Structured, with a PI's of much deeper d-line, stay on feet for tackling, a narrower setting, with possibly exploit the flanks. No direct passing because that will hopefully happen anyway with Control/Structured and correct player roles.
  2. West Brom Inspiration

    So back to the fundamental question, in FM, what form, shape, TI's and PI's do we use to create an overall tactic that has relatively little possession, yet creates an high number of shots + chances?
  3. West Brom Inspiration

    Clubs like WBA under Pulis, Leicester under Ranieri and Rubin Kazan/Rostov under Berdyev do tend to make for a dull match. To me at least I find the sudden and ruthless attacks to be more fun to watch than the endless build up lay that for most teams lead nowhere. Last season I found myself anticipating each and every corner kick that WBA took because they were so powerful. People who know the game hold Pulis in high regard. Its only the press and other managers who can't out manage him. There have been some key changes since Pulis left Stoke. - I don't see nearly as many long balls being played out of the back. While still direct, most now seem to be played into space for an onrushing forward or wing. - The outside backs now push up more, Evans included, only he isn't as comfortable doing so because he's naturally a center back. The still overlap much though. - They seem to use width much more with Phillips, McLean and Chadli all being wingers who like the ball played into space ahead of them so that they can run at defenders. This may or may not be to the same degree as when he was at Palace, but do think that it has become a key part of Pulis' game. Everything else seems to have held true.
  4. West Brom Inspiration

    He seems to like keep his roster small (size not stature) and build a really tight team. I've heard him speak about how a troublesome player can be of value but that you need to to ship him out when his job is done; he said something along the lines of in less than a season.
  5. West Brom Inspiration

    Thanks Jean. I've looked these over and no one seems to get it completely right which of course may not be possible with the match engine. I also think that each of Pulis' teams is a bit more nuanced than he is given credit for. Palace were very different from Stoke and WBA are different from both of those. I don't think that WBA is really all that negative unless they're playing one of the top side. They do seem intent on two things. 1.) Creating space behind the opposition defense into which they attack 2.) Being ruthlessly brutal on each set piece opportunity.
  6. West Brom Inspiration

    After tinkering a bit, I think that control or even attacking with a drop deeper/much deeper TI and only the wingers on attack.
  7. West Brom Inspiration

    LOL, I thought about naming this low possession-high shot or similar, but figured that now one would look at it. Pulis' West Brom side seems to like him and they sure do play according to script.
  8. Open for discussion. How would one emulate West Brom/Pulis tactic. Specifically, what mentality and shape produce what was on display v. Bournemouth which had extremely low possession (29%!) yet produced 16 shots and limiting the opponent to 9 of which only 2 were on target. This was at home against a like opponent and not one of the big teams. I tend to lean toward standard/structured with TI's/PI's to do the rest. I know that counter will produce to slow/indirect a style. Would attacking or control be too adventurous? Formation doesn't seem overly relevant. He began 2016/17 with a 4-4-1-1 and moved to 4-1-4-1 as the season went along. What West Brom does seem different from both Stoke and Palace. Once again, open for opinions, so have at it.
  9. Creating an Underlap

    Thanks for the reply Rashidi. My intuition was as you advised and its didn't do the trick. I also used wingers on support and instructed them to stay wide. I think that team shape and mentality may play a role in whether or not the fullback continues his run. This is where your knowledge might be helpful. The genesis of the this comes from a team which I coached decades ago. They were a very bright group of lads who really understood space and movement. If the pass over the top wasn't on to my very fast forward, they knock it wide to the winger who was hugging the touchline. That was the signal for the fullback to begin his run at speed. From there he was through and would run to even with the 6 yd box to send a short near post cross. I had literally showed this to them once and they ran it to perfection. I still smile when I look at the pic that I have of this team. Not the most talented players who I coached, but by far the best team.
  10. Creating an Underlap

    ajsr, Thanks for the reply. I fiddled with a couple of different 4 at the back formations last night as time allowed and couldn't get the results that I was looking for. The issue with inverted wingbacks is that they go right past the half space into the middle of the pitch with no intention of crossing. A couple of days ago I was able to get the a conventional fullback to come inside the wing, but he would stop his run dead. I couldn't even get this to happen last night. I thought that it might be easier to get wide midfielders to break inside the forwards when they went wide to get the ball. This didn't happen either, but that could be down to other factors, specifically how my opponent's formation/mentality. I'm not giving up on this because I know how effective this can be. Any additional suggestions are more than welcome -OS
  11. Has anyone been able to create an underlap as opposed the overlap? I'm trying to get the wide midfielders to run into the half-spaces and focus on the low near post cross. I find that inverted wingbacks angle toward the near post, look for the through ball and clog the middle. I'd prefer to have one of my two forwards (in a 3-5-2) to break wide and have the wingback move inside him, but I have a feeling that the match engine won't allow for this. My other idea was to play with wingers on support (4-4-2 or 4-5-1) and instruct them to hug the line while telling the fullback on attack to cut inside. Ideas? -OS
  12. Rashidi, Thanks for letting this thread remain open. I skipped over FM 2016, and this discussion has helped me understand how the game has evolved. I'm getting a better picture of why my old tactics aren't nearly as effective. Whether Richard was correct in his guidelines or not is certainly open to discussion, but once I made the adjustments that he suggested, my results improved dramatically. FM 2017 is proving to be a great challenge. Thanks once again -OS
  13. In my somewhat limited viewing of Atletico this year, I think that they've further evolved away from being primarily a counter attacking team. They've also used the 4-1-4-1 very, very often. Actually I think that there can be a fairly in-depth discussion as to whether this is a 4-1-2-2-1/4-3-3 or a 4-1-4-1/4-5-1. When you look at the video clips early in the thread, they seem, in my view to be playing with an attacking tactic that uses "drop much deeper" and "play narrower" TI's. Achieving the level of closing down that is visible is very difficult with the counter mentality in FM. Another key aspect of Simeone's tactics is their highly structured approach. The roles are very distinct and remain the same no matter who is in the line-up. Viewed within the FM team mentality, they do tend to open up quite a bit in attack. Its actually this rapid opening of the playing area when moving from defending to attacking Simeone's team has mastered.
  14. I'm sure that this has worked well, but I have to ask, why play on the counter with Real? It would seem ill suited to a team with so much talent and such a high reputation.
  15. The Artisan tactic that you posted was my primary in the waining days of FM 2015. Remember that he didn't mimic the Simeone's set pieces which are a key aspect of Atletico's strategy. I haven't had much of a chance to try to replicate this in FM 2016. What I've had has gone into trying to develop a Gasperini 3-4-3 which has been about as effective a Genoa's season to date.
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