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Training & Youth Intake - A Brief Guide **Updated for FM20**

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Kindly updated for FM20 by @Seb Wassell

Training

Foreword

For FM19 we completely overhauled training!

It is possible to take as big or as small a role in training as you wish. The Assistant Manager is fully qualified to run training in your absence, he will base his decisions on your tactics, the time of season and his own attributes and preferences.

Taking control yourself allows you to set training from our extensive list of templates on the Training > Calendar page or delve into each and switch one session for another, creating bespoke schedules for the situation at hand. The Assistant always sets training up ahead of time for you, so if you wish to have him mostly run it but dip in and tweak here and there you absolutely can. The easiest way of doing this is directly from the weekly training preview news item that you will receive each Sunday evening. You can even create your own schedules from scratch on the Training > Schedules page and apply them to the Calendar months in advance.
The more specific you wish to be with training the more specialised of a squad you can craft. Training has both short term - the upcoming match - and longer term - player development and attribute growth - influences.

The best piece of advice is to take your time, learn the system and try to get inside the head of a real manager.

Basics

Training is run weekly via Schedules.
Each schedule is made up of Sessions.
There are 3 sessions per day, Session 1, Session 2 and Extra. 
Each session is available for training in a wide variety of exercises, from general team Outfield work to specific Chance Conversion work and even Team Bonding.

image.thumb.png.1c2dd0482e0aca29576fae8305025e08.png

Units

The team is split up into training Units.
These are Goalkeeping, Defensive and Attacking.
By default players are placed into the most suitable unit for them; strikers into Attacking, centre backs into Defensive, etc.
It is possible to move a player from one unit to another. It is also possible to promote a youngster from the youth or reserve team into a senior unit, where he will train on the senior schedule.
The unit a player is in defines what part he takes in each training session.

Sessions

Sessions are training exercises run on general or specific ares of the game.
Sessions are either performed as a whole team or in units.
Each session has Impacts. These are how the sessions will affect the players.

image.thumb.png.8686bdd8b36f9e21c6889949dc8e36f3.png

Impacts

Each session has various impacts, including the attributes it influences, any tactical familiarity gained, the risk of injury during said session and so on.
Each session can have up to three focuses, Primary, Secondary and Tertiary.
Each focus will receive a different amount of attention, and as such the impacts will both differ in type and weighting.
When training in units, each unit receives a different focus. As such, some units may receive 60% of the coaches' attention whilst another may only receive 20%.
Whilst team sessions are performed as a whole group, there can still be different focuses.

  • For example, 'General > Attacking' sees all Outfield players (that is the Attacking and Defensive units) train together, switching places during the session to allow both attack and defence. As such, all players receive 60% focus on attacking attributes, such as Crossing, Dribbling, etc., and 20% focus on defensive attributes, such as Marking, Tackling, etc. The Goalkeeping unit receives 20% of the focus on their specific GK impacts.

image.thumb.png.9605078def595f8c3e258e7f6ecf7ffb.png

Training that is split into positional units has one unit work against the other to complete the exercise, with a certain unit being the main focus of the session.

  • For example, 'Attacking > Attacking Wings' sees the Attacking unit as the main focus of the session, receiving 60% of the attention, meaning a 60% focus on the attributes and impacts listed, such as Anticipation, Finishing, etc. and the associated impacts, such as a slightly increased injury risk. The Defensive and Goalkeeping units work to defend against the Attacking unit and whilst they are not the main focus of the session, they still receive 20% of the attention each, meaning a 20% focus on their relative attributes and other impacts.

image.thumb.png.e5d045dc707293068c98409123b6e128.png

For FM20 we have added three new training sessions!
Attacking overlap, defending from the front and playing from the back.

Intensity

Each session has various impacts, as discussed above. Some of these impacts are things like Injury Risk and Condition.
Intensity is Injury Risk + Condition.
Each day in the schedule has an Intensity associated with it, the combination of Injury Risk + Condition for all three sessions that day. 
This is measured against the %age of an average match.
Only match days would be expected to hit 100%. Only the most intense training would exceed this, with most training days falling comfortably below 100%.
Intensity can be measured for each individual unit or the team as a whole.

image.thumb.png.2db62565c9b1597ba965d12640bb55d6.png

Mentoring

Mentoring is how more influential players in the squad pass on their experience to younger players.
Mentoring allows the manager to group players together for the purpose of sharing Player Traits (PPMs) and passing on desirable (or undesirable) personality traits.
Players must be in the same squad to mentor one another and each group must consist of at least 3 players.
A good starting point is one experienced professional that is a social leader grouped with several younger up-and-coming players that play in a similar position.
It is also possible to set up a short period of one-on-one mentoring via the 'Welcome to club' interaction on signing a new player. This will invite a current player to mentor the new signing off the pitch for a short period of time and ease his transition into his new group of teammates. This affects personality and settling at the club only, no Player Traits (PPMs) are passed.

image.thumb.png.9a3c2a2172054a263ec182456ff753ba.png

Individual Training

Individual training has moved in a more realistic direction.
Complimentary attributes are now grouped together, where it would be impossible to train one without influencing the other.
Some attributes are no longer available under individual training. This is because it is not realistic to be able to train these on a one-on-one basis. They are included in the team and unit training sessions however.

For FM20 we have added to Individual Training!
There are now brand new bespoke Goalkeeper focuses alongside reworked outfield focuses, which include the ability to individually train Crossing and Heading.

Best Practice

Pre-Season

It is advisable to run a proper pre-season, whether this be from our list of pre-season templates or your creating your own. If left to the Assistant, he will run pre-season according to his preferences.

During pre-season players will most likely be at their minimum level of fatigue, the exception being those returning from summer international duty. When fatigue is low a player that works hard physically (sessions that increase fatigue) will improve his long term fitness, meaning he can stave off jadedness longer into the season. However, when a player is already becoming fatigued, sessions that are overly physical (increase fatigue) will tire the player further, meaning he will eventually become jaded.
As such, if you run a proper pre-season the players will remain fitter and last longer into the season proper. Under-working the players in pre-season or over-working the players during the season itself will lead to fatigue.
Of course, too much physical work at any time raises the risk of injury, but this can be an acceptable trade-off if you wish to work the players hard.
Pre-season is also a great time to work on those physical attributes that simply cannot be worked on in any great amount during the season itself due to the fixture schedule.

Matches

It is important to have a Match Preview session before each match, this contains the Pre-match Briefing.
It is also important to run a recovery session after a match and/or allow the players some rest. This is important for regaining condition and staving off injury and fatigue, especially during busy periods.

image.thumb.png.1305aa4fdf8c6f2be2ed16434098b16b.png

Sessions

Other than during pre-season or periods of deliberately working the players hard, say a week with no match, it is not advisable to run more than 2 sessions per day, leaving the Extra sessions as Rest.

Fatigue

Employing a Sports Science is essential to both reducing fatigue and improving recovery from jadedness.

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I have a question about youth development training.

 

I am currently playing as Liverpool so all my training facilities are top notch. I have a couple of 16 year olds I want to develop. I believe that until the age of 18, training is more important than match experience. So, is it better to have my 16 year olds train in the U18s squad, OR, should I have them train with my main squad and make them available for the U18s team? Or, does it not really matter?

 

Thank you!

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4 hours ago, joekim87 said:

I have a question about youth development training.

 

I am currently playing as Liverpool so all my training facilities are top notch. I have a couple of 16 year olds I want to develop. I believe that until the age of 18, training is more important than match experience. So, is it better to have my 16 year olds train in the U18s squad, OR, should I have them train with my main squad and make them available for the U18s team? Or, does it not really matter?

 

Thank you!

From another thread:

On 30/10/2019 at 21:26, Rashidi said:

General rules of thumb I follow

1. If a player is 18 years old, he must play regularly, but he shouldn't be overplayed. He still needs time to train.

2. Playing time with first team is valuable but only if he is good enough and its in games we can actually win

3. If a 4-5 star player is 18 years old and he hasn't got the attributes to play in my first team. I have failed at my job. There is absolutely no reason why a high potential youth player can't be good enough to start at least cup games in your first team squad. This usually points to a problem with the youth team. Check youth team for excessive injuries/ poor training schedules

I usually only keep 1-2 players of 4-5 star potential in my club. Nearly every other player is loaned out, and only to clubs who are playing competitively and where my player gets game time. 

The reason why i don't like leaving them in the U23s. There are some leagues where the U23 is actually a death sentence for development. They hardly have competitions worth playing in, so you need to continually check their schedule or loan them out as well, or go create competitions for them. Even in my saves, the worst players in the club, the ones i want to sell or haven't got time for are in the U23s. My vault, my future, my prized assets are my youth team. And from these prized assets ONLY the very best stay at the age of 18 walk into my first team. The ones who have the potential or are nearly there are loaned out, these are usually my 3-4 stars. The ones who have low potential are there to make up the numbers. I do track how each and every player is doing. 

If you manage the youth teams well, you can get some explosive development. And these players out on loan - if they go to good clubs with good facilities they can sometimes surprise you. One of my best experiences was seeing a 4 star player who had some potential spend around 3 seasons back in Portugal playing for Sporting Lisbon on loan. I was disappointed he didn't walk into my first team. He spent 3 years there on loan as i considered his future. With his contract running out in a year I brought him back. His loan reports were crazy good, when he came back he walked into my first team at the age of 21 and became one of the greatest players i ever had. 

This approach works, very very well. Actually too well, but seeing the new interactive trailer by SI I guess thats the best approach to take. If you can't play him at the age of 18 in your club, you have to play him somewhere where he has the chance to prove himself. Take your team and find the right team for him.

 

On 18/11/2019 at 18:17, Seb Wassell said:

Broadly the best advice is this:

<18 training and mentoring are paramount, with match time important but secondary

18< match time is paramount, with training and mentoring important but secondary

Match time must be at an appropriate level for the player's ability

So if they are a STUD <18, get them on the First Team, to get full benefits of mentoring, make available for the U18's, else let them train/develop on the U18 with the best facilities (not youth facilities) and U18 coaches you can afford/get. (Liverpool shouldn't have much of a problem in either of those departments)

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18 hours ago, Pedroig said:

From another thread:

 

So if they are a STUD <18, get them on the First Team, to get full benefits of mentoring, make available for the U18's, else let them train/develop on the U18 with the best facilities (not youth facilities) and U18 coaches you can afford/get. (Liverpool shouldn't have much of a problem in either of those departments)

Thank you so much! Cleared up everything I wanted to know/

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On 29/10/2019 at 14:20, herne79 said:

Kindly updated for FM20 by @Seb Wassell

Training

Foreword

For FM19 we completely overhauled training!

It is possible to take as big or as small a role in training as you wish. The Assistant Manager is fully qualified to run training in your absence, he will base his decisions on your tactics, the time of season and his own attributes and preferences.

Taking control yourself allows you to set training from our extensive list of templates on the Training > Calendar page or delve into each and switch one session for another, creating bespoke schedules for the situation at hand. The Assistant always sets training up ahead of time for you, so if you wish to have him mostly run it but dip in and tweak here and there you absolutely can. The easiest way of doing this is directly from the weekly training preview news item that you will receive each Sunday evening. You can even create your own schedules from scratch on the Training > Schedules page and apply them to the Calendar months in advance.
The more specific you wish to be with training the more specialised of a squad you can craft. Training has both short term - the upcoming match - and longer term - player development and attribute growth - influences.

The best piece of advice is to take your time, learn the system and try to get inside the head of a real manager.

Basics

Training is run weekly via Schedules.
Each schedule is made up of Sessions.
There are 3 sessions per day, Session 1, Session 2 and Extra. 
Each session is available for training in a wide variety of exercises, from general team Outfield work to specific Chance Conversion work and even Team Bonding.

image.thumb.png.1c2dd0482e0aca29576fae8305025e08.png

Units

The team is split up into training Units.
These are Goalkeeping, Defensive and Attacking.
By default players are placed into the most suitable unit for them; strikers into Attacking, centre backs into Defensive, etc.
It is possible to move a player from one unit to another. It is also possible to promote a youngster from the youth or reserve team into a senior unit, where he will train on the senior schedule.
The unit a player is in defines what part he takes in each training session.

Sessions

Sessions are training exercises run on general or specific ares of the game.
Sessions are either performed as a whole team or in units.
Each session has Impacts. These are how the sessions will affect the players.

image.thumb.png.8686bdd8b36f9e21c6889949dc8e36f3.png

Impacts

Each session has various impacts, including the attributes it influences, any tactical familiarity gained, the risk of injury during said session and so on.
Each session can have up to three focuses, Primary, Secondary and Tertiary.
Each focus will receive a different amount of attention, and as such the impacts will both differ in type and weighting.
When training in units, each unit receives a different focus. As such, some units may receive 60% of the coaches' attention whilst another may only receive 20%.
Whilst team sessions are performed as a whole group, there can still be different focuses.

  • For example, 'General > Attacking' sees all Outfield players (that is the Attacking and Defensive units) train together, switching places during the session to allow both attack and defence. As such, all players receive 60% focus on attacking attributes, such as Crossing, Dribbling, etc., and 20% focus on defensive attributes, such as Marking, Tackling, etc. The Goalkeeping unit receives 20% of the focus on their specific GK impacts.

image.thumb.png.9605078def595f8c3e258e7f6ecf7ffb.png

Training that is split into positional units has one unit work against the other to complete the exercise, with a certain unit being the main focus of the session.

  • For example, 'Attacking > Attacking Wings' sees the Attacking unit as the main focus of the session, receiving 60% of the attention, meaning a 60% focus on the attributes and impacts listed, such as Anticipation, Finishing, etc. and the associated impacts, such as a slightly increased injury risk. The Defensive and Goalkeeping units work to defend against the Attacking unit and whilst they are not the main focus of the session, they still receive 20% of the attention each, meaning a 20% focus on their relative attributes and other impacts.

image.thumb.png.e5d045dc707293068c98409123b6e128.png

For FM20 we have added three new training sessions!
Attacking overlap, defending from the front and playing from the back.

Intensity

Each session has various impacts, as discussed above. Some of these impacts are things like Injury Risk and Condition.
Intensity is Injury Risk + Condition.
Each day in the schedule has an Intensity associated with it, the combination of Injury Risk + Condition for all three sessions that day. 
This is measured against the %age of an average match.
Only match days would be expected to hit 100%. Only the most intense training would exceed this, with most training days falling comfortably below 100%.
Intensity can be measured for each individual unit or the team as a whole.

image.thumb.png.2db62565c9b1597ba965d12640bb55d6.png

Mentoring

Mentoring is how more influential players in the squad pass on their experience to younger players.
Mentoring allows the manager to group players together for the purpose of sharing Player Traits (PPMs) and passing on desirable (or undesirable) personality traits.
Players must be in the same squad to mentor one another and each group must consist of at least 3 players.
A good starting point is one experienced professional that is a social leader grouped with several younger up-and-coming players that play in a similar position.
It is also possible to set up a short period of one-on-one mentoring via the 'Welcome to club' interaction on signing a new player. This will invite a current player to mentor the new signing off the pitch for a short period of time and ease his transition into his new group of teammates. This affects personality and settling at the club only, no Player Traits (PPMs) are passed.

image.thumb.png.9a3c2a2172054a263ec182456ff753ba.png

Individual Training

Individual training has moved in a more realistic direction.
Complimentary attributes are now grouped together, where it would be impossible to train one without influencing the other.
Some attributes are no longer available under individual training. This is because it is not realistic to be able to train these on a one-on-one basis. They are included in the team and unit training sessions however.

For FM20 we have added to Individual Training!
There are now brand new bespoke Goalkeeper focuses alongside reworked outfield focuses, which include the ability to individually train Crossing and Heading.

Best Practice

Pre-Season

It is advisable to run a proper pre-season, whether this be from our list of pre-season templates or your creating your own. If left to the Assistant, he will run pre-season according to his preferences.

During pre-season players will most likely be at their minimum level of fatigue, the exception being those returning from summer international duty. When fatigue is low a player that works hard physically (sessions that increase fatigue) will improve his long term fitness, meaning he can stave off jadedness longer into the season. However, when a player is already becoming fatigued, sessions that are overly physical (increase fatigue) will tire the player further, meaning he will eventually become jaded.
As such, if you run a proper pre-season the players will remain fitter and last longer into the season proper. Under-working the players in pre-season or over-working the players during the season itself will lead to fatigue.
Of course, too much physical work at any time raises the risk of injury, but this can be an acceptable trade-off if you wish to work the players hard.
Pre-season is also a great time to work on those physical attributes that simply cannot be worked on in any great amount during the season itself due to the fixture schedule.

Matches

It is important to have a Match Preview session before each match, this contains the Pre-match Briefing.
It is also important to run a recovery session after a match and/or allow the players some rest. This is important for regaining condition and staving off injury and fatigue, especially during busy periods.

image.thumb.png.1305aa4fdf8c6f2be2ed16434098b16b.png

Sessions

Other than during pre-season or periods of deliberately working the players hard, say a week with no match, it is not advisable to run more than 2 sessions per day, leaving the Extra sessions as Rest.

Fatigue

Employing a Sports Science is essential to both reducing fatigue and improving recovery from jadedness.

I am really interested to know how I should approach training with my Arsenal side. I am looking to play a 4-2-3-1 with counter pressing and a high tempo. Am I meant to approach training with that in mind or are you trying to work every single element or picking and choosing thsoe suitable to your style of play?

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On 27/11/2019 at 17:55, The Solman said:

I am really interested to know how I should approach training with my Arsenal side. I am looking to play a 4-2-3-1 with counter pressing and a high tempo. Am I meant to approach training with that in mind or are you trying to work every single element or picking and choosing thsoe suitable to your style of play?

In a very broad sense, I would say you want train for your tactic. Which means a good balance between preparing the team for the next match and crafting their attributes towards those that are most useful for your playing style.

For something that involves high tempo, counter pressing I would suggest looking at the 'Gegenpress' default schedule. It is specifically designed for that style of play. You can then tweak from there as you see fit.

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Are youth coaches coaching youth players already visible or junior players that are not yet visible and are coming through youth ranks in few years? 

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Youth coaches are the ones that will be assigned to your youth team (typically U18 or U19 team), but not the junior pre-intake players.

You can see this a bit more clearly when you look at the coaching assignments for the youth team (as it'll have primarily your youth coaches! You'll also see which coaches are able to work double duty between youth team and junior team)

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A question about mentoring. I know we can create groups in our first team and youth team(s) :

I think it is better to promote the good U18's to the first team and put them in a mentoring group from the first team ? Is it also a good idea to promote the best U18's to the first team 'units' ?

What about the mentoring group in youth teams, are they useful ? Or just promote all the hot prospects to the first team and mentor them their ? 

Players +18 get first team apps or are loaned out to teams where they should get games with if possible good training facilities . I think that is the right approach ?

Edited by OlivierL

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