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HAMMER AND ANVIL -GUARDIOLA MASTERCLASS – GUIDE TO CREATING OVERLOADS IN FM19

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I also liked the idea you focus play down the opposite side of the overload. Thats how i understand exploiting too... I made a 4 33 0 on last years with Ajax with two Raumdueters, and focused play down one side and my LW one banged in a lot of goals. 

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56 minutes ago, craigd84 said:

I also liked the idea you focus play down the opposite side of the overload. Thats how i understand exploiting too... I made a 4 33 0 on last years with Ajax with two Raumdueters, and focused play down one side and my LW one banged in a lot of goals. 

I tried focusing on the side of the overload at first and it didn't work as well. So settled on focusing on opposite side.

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yeah because not only do they look to keep ball they also look to attack through it totally negating the right side if my memory serves me correctly.

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On 15/06/2019 at 00:29, crusadertsar said:

Hammer and Anvil – The concept of Tactical Envelopment

envelop.gif?w=620

This reminds me of my current total war campaign (and every total war campaign actually). Since I am fond of using The Art of War to generate ideas for how to manage, I approve of using battle tactics in football!

I think your first and third points are key. I usually avoid using asymmetry in tactics, as it will affect my defensive shape as much as my attacking, and this can cause issues all on its own.

Looking at the figure I quoted, I think you have highlighted an absolutely key point that a lot of people may miss when they are learning the game. Football is a team sport. They attack as a unit, and so you need to consider the entire formation. Players are your units. What is each player doing, and how does it help you win? How is the opposition going to respond to what you are doing and how can you exploit that. Creating overloads to drag a defense out of position and create space on a different area of the pitch is absolutely critical for creating successful tactics. Especially for managing top sides, when you have to create your own space.

To give a specific example of one of the common ways I do this. I pair an IF(A), FB(A) on the same flank, and on the same side of the midfield I have a playmaker. Attacking down that flank will concentrate 3 players (4 if you have a support role for your striker and he moves into the half space). This will draw defenders to one side, which automatically creates space in the center and the opposite side of the pitch. You then have roles such as CM(A), BBM(S), W(S), IF(S) on the opposite flank to exploit this. A DM who sits and holds to act as a pivot helps. This would be something similar to the top right example in the quoted picture. Fix the force on one side, attack it on the other.

I would love to see other people share how they create overloads too, I think it would be very beneficial to anyone who is learning how to think globally with player positions, roles and duties.

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15 hours ago, ivanbox said:

Good work!

What about City current tactic? Any advices?

 

 

Thanks! If you are trying to recreate Man City, I would use either Sane or Sterling as the attacking flanking force to unlock the opponent defence. While at same time concentrate your playmakers on the opposite side. So use Silva in deeper position as Mezzala and Debruyne (subbed by Foden) on the wing. De Brunei even comes with handy "likes to switch ball to the other side" trait.

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@sporadicsmiles Thank you for the thoughtful reply. Couldn't agree more with you on the army analogy and the importance of thinking of the whole team as a group of unit. I'm thinking of doing more military crossover tactics maybe :)

And also thanks for giving example of how you create overloads. I like your method. Would love to see how others create overloads as well.

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Hi and thanks for your article!

I don't understand very well the defense part.

If opposition attacks on the right (so your left side or hammer side), who defend? The wing back? Because I suppose the Raumdeuter doesn't participate a lot to defensive work.

If opposite team plays with a winger on the right, it could be difficult for your team in transition phases, right?

 

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3 hours ago, crusadertsar said:

Thanks! If you are trying to recreate Man City, I would use either Sane or Sterling as the attacking flanking force to unlock the opponent defence. While at same time concentrate your playmakers on the opposite side. So use Silva in deeper position as Mezzala and Debruyne (subbed by Foden) on the wing. De Brunei even comes with handy "likes to switch ball to the other side" trait.

Thanks! I will try!

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4 hours ago, rouflaquettes31 said:

Hi and thanks for your article!

I don't understand very well the defense part.

If opposition attacks on the right (so your left side or hammer side), who defend? The wing back? Because I suppose the Raumdeuter doesn't participate a lot to defensive work.

If opposite team plays with a winger on the right, it could be difficult for your team in transition phases, right?

 

I understand your concern but that is why I had a holding midfield to compensate for wingback and raumdeuter being more offensive. I actually switched from bbm to dlp on that side. And it helps switching the tactic depending on the opposition.  I will use my raumdeuter and wingback always on the side where opponent has weaker, aka slower winger or wingback. Also the whole point of overloads is to expose the ai so if they actually use enough players to threaten me on my raumdeuter flank, then chances are that they will be destroyed on the side that I'm overloading.  It's a sort of catch 22 for ai. On that side I have 5 or at times 6 players. I never see AI ignore such threat. So in other words, I wouldn't worry too much about their counterattacks

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Ok! It's often the same question : put a 'defensive' winger to defend against dangerous wing back,

or put a dangerous winger to prevent opposite wing back to attack. You choose the second one ;-)

Anyway, your article gives me some ideas to improve my tactic. Thank you!

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On 18/06/2019 at 08:03, sporadicsmiles said:

I would love to see other people share how they create overloads too, I think it would be very beneficial to anyone who is learning how to think globally with player positions, roles and duties

Okay, let's assume I want to build attacks on the left before switching play to the right for my players attacking the space(s) there. One possible way can be:

4-4-2

DLFsu    PO

 

WMsu    DLPsu    CMde     Wat

 

FBsu       CD      C  D      WBde

4141DM Wide

DLFsu

APsu                                    Wat

CAR     CMat

HB

FBat       CD      CD       IWBde

4231 (the most risky and hence tricky one)

PFsu

IFsu             TQ              RMD

DLPsu     CMde

 

FBat       CD      CD       IWBsu

I think the idea is clear. Of course, besides roles and duties, team and player instructions will also play an important part. When I look to base a tactic on overloads, the Play out of defence TI is a must. Other instructions can vary. I also tend to use the overlap on the more attacking side in order to reduce the mentality gap between the fullback and his more advanced attack-duty partner, but that's just my personal preference and is clearly not necessary (especially not necessary in the last 4231 example, since the IWB is on support rather than defend duty, meaning he'll be exactly where I want him without a need for the overlap TI).

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@Experienced Defender Thanks for sharing! Those are great setups. Good call on Overlap instruction. Also was wondering what your reason is for making "Play out of defense" essential? I figure it's good building up possession slowly. But I figured that to keep possession on the overloaded side Control mentality and support duties would be sufficient. But maybe I'll need to add it to my tactic

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13 hours ago, rouflaquettes31 said:

Ok! It's often the same question : put a 'defensive' winger to defend against dangerous wing back,

or put a dangerous winger to prevent opposite wing back to attack. You choose the second one ;-)

Anyway, your article gives me some ideas to improve my tactic. Thank you!

Glad it helped with your tactic :) And yes I'm a believer that good offense is the best defense 

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1 hour ago, crusadertsar said:

Also was wondering what your reason is for making "Play out of defense" essential? I figure it's good building up possession slowly. But I figured that to keep possession on the overloaded side Control mentality and support duties would be sufficient. But maybe I'll need to add it to my tactic

Your assumption is basically spot on - it does have to do with possession-based styles. Because when I use overloads as a tactical weapon, I do it only in situations when I look to control the match and dominate. And when I say "possession" football, I do not refer only to patient possession styles like tiki-taka, but to all that imply controlling the game. In fact, I never play slow and patient possession styles - I am a fan of hardcore English/British football :D

On the other hand, I don't see much point in using overloads when I (want to) play rather defensive and counter-attacking football, simply because I don't want to keep possession in any area of the pitch for too long. Instead, I want to have as fast transitions as possible.

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14 hours ago, Experienced Defender said:

Okay, let's assume I want to build attacks on the left before switching play to the right for my players attacking the space(s) there. One possible way can be:

4-4-2

DLFsu    PO

 

WMsu    DLPsu    CMde     Wat

 

FBsu       CD      C  D      WBde

I find this setup quite interesting. Now I actually just watched BTN video on Overloads.
 

Spoiler

 

So the theory here, is that the overloading side is on attack in order to draw defenders and midfielders out of position in order to make room for the right side attacking the empty space. Now this is done with midfielders on attack duty. So im curious to see how well supporting roles can/will do the same thing. Are defenders really going to be threatened and leave their position against a DLP and WM on support?

Have you actually tried this, or is it just theory crafting? If you haven't I might do the experiment when i get home. 

BONUS INFO: I am currently managing FC Nordsjælland (as they are pretty much a danish discount version of Ajax) trying out almost the exact 4-4-1-1 shown in the video with great success as they really have great players for this.

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@Purplejesus Great video! Rashidi is a tactical genius and always thinks up great tactics. I actually tested it out for half a season with Fiorentina. Sitting in 5th so far so doing much better than my media prediction. Managed to beat Juventus. But more testing is probably required.

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Posted (edited)
On 18/06/2019 at 02:03, sporadicsmiles said:

To give a specific example of one of the common ways I do this. I pair an IF(A), FB(A) on the same flank, and on the same side of the midfield I have a playmaker. Attacking down that flank will concentrate 3 players (4 if you have a support role for your striker and he moves into the half space). This will draw defenders to one side, which automatically creates space in the center and the opposite side of the pitch. You then have roles such as CM(A), BBM(S), W(S), IF(S) on the opposite flank to exploit this. A DM who sits and holds to act as a pivot helps. This would be something similar to the top right example in the quoted picture. Fix the force on one side, attack it on the other.

This is very similar to the overload I created by accident. My setup is loosely based on van Gaal's 1998/99 Barcelona team with Rivaldo, Figo, Guardiola, Kluivert, Luis Enrique, Cocu, etc. I set this up thinking the IF(A) and CM(A) would be goal scorers but they have turned into the creators. I score a lot of goals because the IF, MEZ and WB overload the left side so when they pass back to the right the CM(A), W(S) and PF(S) are usually in a 3v2 situation. My CM(A) leads the team in assists and the PF(S) and W(S) lead the team in goals. 

PF(S)

IF(A)                                   W(S)

MEZ(S)     CM(A)

DLP(D)

WB(S)       CD      CD       FB(S)

Edited by andrewsgn

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5 hours ago, Purplejesus said:

So the theory here, is that the overloading side is on attack in order to draw defenders and midfielders out of position in order to make room for the right side attacking the empty space. Now this is done with midfielders on attack duty. So im curious to see how well supporting roles can/will do the same thing. Are defenders really going to be threatened and leave their position against a DLP and WM on support?

In this video, Rashidi offered 3 different examples of an overload. The one you are referring to is the only one where attack duties were used to create an overload. In the other two, the overloads were created by support duties (coupled with appropriate roles, such as PM, MEZ, DLF). So there are different types of overload, depending on where and how you want to create it.

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5 hours ago, Purplejesus said:

Have you actually tried this, or is it just theory crafting? If you haven't I might do the experiment when i get home

I've tried this particular type of overload (the 442 one) with Brighton on several occasions. It has not worked equally successfully every single time, but can always be improved with a couple of tweaks.

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Here's an example of the overload I mentioned a few posts above. By overloading the left we are able to create a goal with a few simple passes back to the right.

Hourihane (DLP-D) plays a ball out to my left back, Taylor (WB-S). Norwich is playing a 4-2-3-1 and are narrow and compact with all but their striker behind the ball.

20190620104047_1.thumb.jpg.afc9cd9387a2328bab04862ba99fd0fc.jpg

 

Taylor cuts the ball back to Lansbury (MEZ-S). El Ghazi (IF-A) is just inside of Lansbury. Both of Norwich's DM's have shifted over.

 20190620104204_1.thumb.jpg.9c84567a3dca49ae350f088e016b98bb.jpg

 

El Ghazi stops his run and Lansbury plays a simple ball to him. Because the DM's have shifted we have a 3v2 with Grealish (CM-A) unmarked right at the edge of the box.

20190620104224_1.thumb.jpg.b2b35390835dcb93ea4490b25ce7c63c.jpg

 

El Ghazi plays the ball to Grealish who taps it over to Bolasie (W-S) who has a clear shot and scores the goal. 

20190620104351_1.thumb.jpg.46388b2bc7915aee0a72fec8e0c845b3.jpg

 

As I mentioned I kind of stumbled into this but it's proving very effective. Granted, Aston Villa are one of the stronger Championship teams, but we've scored 38 goals so far in 15 matches. My AMR's (Bolasie and Adomah as W-S) have combined for 11 goals. My striker, Abraham, has 11 goals and 5 assists. Grealish leads the team with 7 assists as CM(A).  

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52 minutes ago, andrewsgn said:

Here's an example of the overload I mentioned a few posts above. By overloading the left we are able to create a goal with a few simple passes back to the right.

Hourihane (DLP-D) plays a ball out to my left back, Taylor (WB-S). Norwich is playing a 4-2-3-1 and are narrow and compact with all but their striker behind the ball.

20190620104047_1.thumb.jpg.afc9cd9387a2328bab04862ba99fd0fc.jpg

 

Taylor cuts the ball back to Lansbury (MEZ-S). El Ghazi (IF-A) is just inside of Lansbury. Both of Norwich's DM's have shifted over.

 20190620104204_1.thumb.jpg.9c84567a3dca49ae350f088e016b98bb.jpg

 

El Ghazi stops his run and Lansbury plays a simple ball to him. Because the DM's have shifted we have a 3v2 with Grealish (CM-A) unmarked right at the edge of the box.

20190620104224_1.thumb.jpg.b2b35390835dcb93ea4490b25ce7c63c.jpg

 

El Ghazi plays the ball to Grealish who taps it over to Bolasie (W-S) who has a clear shot and scores the goal. 

20190620104351_1.thumb.jpg.46388b2bc7915aee0a72fec8e0c845b3.jpg

 

As I mentioned I kind of stumbled into this but it's proving very effective. Granted, Aston Villa are one of the stronger Championship teams, but we've scored 38 goals so far in 15 matches. My AMR's (Bolasie and Adomah as W-S) have combined for 11 goals. My striker, Abraham, has 11 goals and 5 assists. Grealish leads the team with 7 assists as CM(A).  

What Mentality/TI/PI do you use? Is it possible that it affected on CM(A)/IF(A) to create chances and W(S)/PF(S) to score goals?

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24 minutes ago, dokera said:

What Mentality/TI/PI do you use? Is it possible that it affected on CM(A)/IF(A) to create chances and W(S)/PF(S) to score goals?

This is my current setup:

Capture.thumb.PNG.9e020e6e22d0c36f0b3b3fcbcd69ccf8.PNG

I drop Overlap Left when I use a WB(S) as DL. The WB(D) is something I'm experimenting with as I find WB(S) crosses too much and Taylor is not a good crosser or dribbler. I was also a little vulnerable on this flank with an IF(A) and MEZ(S).

For PI's:

IF(A) - Sit Narrower, Roam From Position, Close Down More

W(S) - Close Down More

MEZ(S) - Close Down More

CM(A) - Roam From Position, Close Down More

DLP(D) - Take More Risks, Close Down Less

FB(S) - Sit Narrower, Take Fewer Risks

 

 

 

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16 hours ago, andrewsgn said:

This is my current setup:

Capture.thumb.PNG.9e020e6e22d0c36f0b3b3fcbcd69ccf8.PNG

I drop Overlap Left when I use a WB(S) as DL. The WB(D) is something I'm experimenting with as I find WB(S) crosses too much and Taylor is not a good crosser or dribbler. I was also a little vulnerable on this flank with an IF(A) and MEZ(S).

For PI's:

IF(A) - Sit Narrower, Roam From Position, Close Down More

W(S) - Close Down More

MEZ(S) - Close Down More

CM(A) - Roam From Position, Close Down More

DLP(D) - Take More Risks, Close Down Less

FB(S) - Sit Narrower, Take Fewer Risks

 

 

 

Sometimes simplicity is most effective. Great set up

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I don't think I properly understood the concept of overloading until I read this. I've tried implementing a few of these player role suggestions into my gameplan and I've definitely noticed more space opening up on the opposite flank. Really good post, cheers!

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9 hours ago, Ugeine said:

I don't think I properly understood the concept of overloading until I read this. I've tried implementing a few of these player role suggestions into my gameplan and I've definitely noticed more space opening up on the opposite flank. Really good post, cheers!

Thats awesome mate! Makes me happy that I was able to help you

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