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Your managerial "role model" ?

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Guardiola, Sarri, Setién, Paulo Fonseca and Miguel Cardoso in one side of the spectrum (the ones I like the most); Mourinho and Simeone on the other end (the ones whose teams I can't watch for more than 30 mins).

Doesn't mean being better or worse, just a personal preference.

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If I had to choose only one it would be Marcelo Bielsa when he managed Chile during the 2010 World Cup. It was probably some of the most entertaining and interesting football I've ever watched.

A close second would be Diego Simeone and his Athletico Madrid squad. Particually when playing a big side away - the games where they stand REALLY compact and invite pressure. I know most casual football fans don't like his negative and physical style in these games, but I think it's BEAUTIFUL!

 

Edit: Why aren't we able to choose our "idol" when creating our profile on FM? It could make for some good story lines...

 

Edited by KongeMeier

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48 minutes ago, KongeMeier said:

A close second would be Diego Simeone and his Athletico Madrid squad. Particually when playing a big side away - the games where they stand REALLY compact and invite pressure. I know most casual football fans don't like his negative and physical style in these games, but I think it's BEAUTIFUL!

Me too. It's my favorite style of football :thup:

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I have the utmost respect for Guy Roux. He basically played FM in real life.

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My favourite style to watch is definitely the classic English wideplay. I know it's not the most successful approach, but it's just fun to watch. Redknapp's Tottenham with Lennon and Bale wide was just high tempo madness across 90 minutes.

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Zdenek Zeman (I am a Roma fan).

4-3-3, always pressing with a high defensive line and offside trap, and hyper-attacking and more direct no matter what the situation.
Attacking wing-backs, regista, mezzalas, inside forwards, pressing forward. Hard training, using young players.

If I don't score the most goals in the league and concede something near a relegation club then it's a failure.

Usually it has been hard to make a success of this but after using the first season tweaking with Sassuolo, the second season was F: 108, A: 54, P: 3rd, with 22 games of over 4 goals between teams!

 

Just a shame you can't set up the team to kick off like this.

hpHD6.jpg

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Tony Pulis.

Not so much for his direct style but how he manages to mould a team to literally run through brick walls for him.  It is difficult to repeat in FM as his tactics are very simple, or were when he was at Stoke, and a lot of his success is down to the dressing room and the atmosphere it generates.

I also admire how he managed to go in at Palace and manage a lot of attacking players that were naturally at odds with his pragmatic style.

He seems to have that knack of being able to build a solid defence and maximize his efficiency in grinding out 1 nil wins.

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Big Sam for me, responsible for me seeing some of the best times and best players ever to grace a Bolton shirt. Youri Djorkaeff , Jay Jay Okocha, Fernando Hierro ,Ivan Campo, Stelios Giannakopoulos, and Kevin Davies  - 2 jaunts in Europe and brought in the sports science and stats used in American Football. Planned with meticulous detail to get the extra 1% from each player. Used to bloody the noses of the big boys regularly and wind the likes of Wenger up.

The long ball tag came from when Bolton beat Newcastle 2-1 at the Reebok and Souness moaned about it post match and the tag stuck with him, unfairly. Hes seen as a short term option for struggling teams and hes played up to that in last few years but earned a few quid doing it.

Will never be seen as glamorous but i do believe that if you put him in charge of a big club like a Manchester Untied or Real Madrid - he would win them a few trophies 

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I can't ever seem to get the best out of my players and always seem to be falling out with big players leading to them asking for a transfer so I suppose I would say my Role Model on that front would be Mourinho

:rolleyes:

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I love Mou's "us against them" mentality but I don't like parking the bus as it really is boring and I also don't like tiki taka or similar styles as they struck me as boring too.

What I want to achieve is Jose's goal record breaking Real Madrid. No unnecessary passing, no slow buildup just deadly counter attacks...

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I can't say he's my model or all-time favorite, but Didier Deschamps and the way he managed the French team at the WC is definitely a huge inspiration for me. I love his pragmatism, how he blended players with very different tactical backgrounds and made it work perfectly. He didn't pull any genius tactical trick, nor seemed to have a strong charisma. He simply built the most flexible team of the competition and allowed the best players to shine.

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4 horas atrás, Ultrajet disse:

I can't say he's my model or all-time favorite, but Didier Deschamps and the way he managed the French team at the WC is definitely a huge inspiration for me. I love his pragmatism, how he blended players with very different tactical backgrounds and made it work perfectly. He didn't pull any genius tactical trick, nor seemed to have a strong charisma. He simply built the most flexible team of the competition and allowed the best players to shine.

Deschamps made Pogba seem a normal player, where he absolutely shines, and that's something I really admire.

I don't know why Man Utd / Mourinho felt the need to make Pogba the star, the main playmaker, to transform a 6/8 into a 10 by brute force. Pirlo was amazing as a 6. Xavi was amazing as a 6. Essien (in his best, tho short moment) was amazing as a 6. So why force Pogba to be what he's not?

Deschamps made that simple and easy again, and he should be congratulated for it.

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Pep says that Bielsa is the best coach in the world.

Bielsa has gone on record to say that Chris Wilder has successfully implemented a style of play that he has tried and failed with numerous times.

This leads me to conclude that Chris Wilder is currently the best manager in the world.

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When I manage (no tactic issues) club and can't take decision, I think 'What would Sir Alex Ferguson do in this situation?'

He is a reference how to take a discipline and a reference how to impove club.

Pep Guardiola looks like him, but Pep didnt work a lot of times in one club yet. Legacy of SAF is wonderful, its not only club, its Empire.

I read his biography twice :)

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Those interested in SAF and tactics should read Michael Cox's (the guy behind Zonal Marking) The Mixer, as he goes into that quite a bit.

As for role models, I appreciate what Guardiola, Pochettino, and Klopp have all done in terms of creating successful and exciting modern systems of play, and it's no coincidence that you can trace back to Bielsa from all three of them. El Loco has been an absolute gift to football fans in so many ways.

Rinus Michels is a great shout as well. Teambuilding is an excellent book (if a little stilted in translation) and I've used it in my regular professional career quite a bit as well as applying it to FM as best I can -- and probably that can be said to be a philosophy of mine, that I tend not to be results-oriented and instead more process-oriented -- if I'm successful in creating a structure and flow of proper processes that people can follow, then results will necessarily come as part of that.

Edited by scratchmonkey

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Trapattoni, but also often taking some inspiration from Marcello Lippi and Fabio Capello. What I admire in Trapattoni is his ruthless defensive organization, I enjoy Lippi's chameleontic pragmatism and ability to strike a balance between attack and defence, and I am very much a Capello-like disciplinarian who tends to favor the 4-4-2 system. Among present day managers I find Gian Piero Gasperini at Atalanta very interesting. He has brought back old-fashioned man-marking, always adapting his formation to outnumber attackers, with a very dynamic offensive game. Atalanta is one of the few teams in Italy that regularly manages to beat Juventus.

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I think the most underated of managers and a guy whose ideas have shaped my understanding of football just as much as Cruyff and Michels is Valery Lobanovsky. He took both the individual and collective training sessions to new levels and his 442 was refined into a perfect machine of quick vertical passes, relentless pressing and varied defensive approaches the likes of which we have never seen again.

Without him there would have been no Bielsa, no Sachi, no Simeone and no Klopp and the ways of training would be stuck 20 years in the past. 

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Em 08/12/2018 em 05:36, NabsKebabs disse:

@yonko I 100% agree that SAF would struggle to take on these tactical minds.

I mean, SAF struggled against Mourinho and even Wenger for many years. The main reason his rivalry with Wenger became one sided in the end was due to external factors such as Arsenal's new stadium and club philosophy at the time. Arsenal weren't necessarily trying to win the title from roughly 2007 onwards. 

The likes of Guardiola, Klopp, Poch, Emery, Mourinho and even Marco Silva would really be a challenge for him. And I don't think he'd fare very well.

I only saw this now, but to say even Marco Silva would really be a challenge... Marco Silva is the most press likeable coach in the world today, only reason he make such poor works on the field and still gets credit for it. The dude came out of Estoril to Sporting because he put Estoril in the 4th place, then he was absolut **** at Sporting. That team was cross show every second of the 90 minutes. At Hull City he was fighting hard to not be depromoted, but at Watford he showed again how overrated he was. Now at Everton he shows it again. He has a great side, you can't deny it and you still see the Marco Silva "Cross show" every day all day.

The other day he beat a horrific United with 2 long shots and a long throw. His side was way better, but any decent team could have beaten them. United gave them all the space they could wish for at the middle, and they still only played by the flanks for the cross. They were inexistent at the middle. Thats why they didn't create much danger as they should against a team that had 90m between lines and was very slow on and off the ball. 

If you think SAF would have a hard time against someone as Marco Silva, sorry but I must laugh.

7149f4b584491922b647dc609063201d.png

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This team couldn't exploit a space in a game thats all about space and movement even if they life depended on it. That's why they have as many defeats as victorys, even if they are in 7th place.

Edited by Razor940

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My manager is mainly a motivator and builds up a team from young (team-)players what saves money and gives combined with the motivation a bunch of players with the "never know when you have lost"- mentality."

And it is also good not to concede a goal.

And it is also good to be fitter than the opponent

 

 

So the idol would be a hybrid of Heynckes, Simeone and Herrera

:D

 

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19 hours ago, Razor940 said:

I only saw this now, but to say even Marco Silva would really be a challenge... Marco Silva is the most press likeable coach in the world today, only reason he make such poor works on the field and still gets credit for it. The dude came out of Estoril to Sporting because he put Estoril in the 4th place, then he was absolut **** at Sporting. That team was cross show every second of the 90 minutes. At Hull City he was fighting hard to not be depromoted, but at Watford he showed again how overrated he was. Now at Everton he shows it again. He has a great side, you can't deny it and you still see the Marco Silva "Cross show" every day all day.

The other day he beat a horrific United with 2 long shots and a long throw. His side was way better, but any decent team could have beaten them. United gave them all the space they could wish for at the middle, and they still only played by the flanks for the cross. They were inexistent at the middle. Thats why they didn't create much danger as they should against a team that had 90m between lines and was very slow on and off the ball. 

If you think SAF would have a hard time against someone as Marco Silva, sorry but I must laugh.

7149f4b584491922b647dc609063201d.png

fc6921a4379a1e37583895208db2eedc.png

This team couldn't exploit a space in a game thats all about space and movement even if they life depended on it. That's why they have as many defeats as victorys, even if they are in 7th place.

What a load of kak. Everton were absolutely brilliant in that match and deserved the 4-0 win. It was no fluke, like you made it out to be because not only did I watch that game but I also watched Everton completely out play the team I support, Arsenal - just 2 weeks earlier.  Arsenal deserved to lose 3-0 or 4-0 but Leno saved our asses. The pressing of Everton was absolutely incredible in both games, I was amazed. Neither Arsenal or United could get out of their own half because the structure and aggression of the midfield press was simply too good and too solid to play through. Everton also recently beat Chelsea 2-0 and held Liverpool to a 0-0 not long before that. You must be watching a different team, because you are talking absolute rubbish. 

Edited by NabsKebabs

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On 24/04/2019 at 03:25, Gianni Brera said:

Trapattoni, but also often taking some inspiration from Marcello Lippi and Fabio Capello. What I admire in Trapattoni is his ruthless defensive organization, I enjoy Lippi's chameleontic pragmatism and ability to strike a balance between attack and defence, and I am very much a Capello-like disciplinarian who tends to favor the 4-4-2 system. Among present day managers I find Gian Piero Gasperini at Atalanta very interesting. He has brought back old-fashioned man-marking, always adapting his formation to outnumber attackers, with a very dynamic offensive game. Atalanta is one of the few teams in Italy that regularly manages to beat Juventus.

That's a darn good shout!

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17 horas atrás, NabsKebabs disse:

What a load of kak. Everton were absolutely brilliant in that match and deserved the 4-0 win. It was no fluke, like you made it out to be because not only did I watch that game but I also watched Everton completely out play the team I support, Arsenal - just 2 weeks earlier.  Arsenal deserved to lose 3-0 or 4-0 but Leno saved our asses. The pressing of Everton was absolutely incredible in both games, I was amazed. Neither Arsenal or United could get out of their own half because the structure and aggression of the midfield press was simply too good and too solid to play through. Everton also recently beat Chelsea 2-0 and held Liverpool to a 0-0 not long before that. You must be watching a different team, because you are talking absolute rubbish. 

I'm not saying their press isn't good, it is very good

 

IszWFlK.png

 

but on the offensive end there are a lot things to say about. It's not rubbish.

Edited by Razor940

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Ole Gunnar Solskjær.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No, just kidding ;P, My manager idols are Klopp and SAF. 

Edited by smeagol

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Interesting topic and one that has me stumped. Having grown up through so many managerial masterclasses I can find admiration through most ranging from Mourinho to Keegan tbh. If I had to pick a few it'd be a quad-brid (ah new word) between Mourinho, Benitez, Klopp and Guardiola. I think they've had the most influence on myself tactically. No matter what club I am at I can draw inspiration from those managers.

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Oh, I forgot, I also have a real admiration for early Arsenal era Wenger, before he got obsessed with tiki taka and possession football. Arsenal played some really beautiful counter-attacking football. 

Edited by smeagol

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Mourinho (his first stint at Chelsea, and Inter Milan) and Simeone. I like a team with a really strong defence, that can counter-attack fast and eficiently. Too bad that on FM, I just get good results when I play a possession based, short-pass football. Maybe it's just me, but I feel like the game is unbalaced.

 

For man-management and personality, Klopp.

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On 05/12/2018 at 14:52, iMan said:

A bit harsh that. He took a back seat for 2 seasons when Jose arrived and then won 3 leagues on the bounce and another European cup.

That side also showed real tactical evolution as well. They were very well organized and lethal on the counter in big away games in the league and in Europe compared to his previous sides . He used Park Ji Sung fantastically in a lot of those type of games as well.

When he lost Tevez and Ronaldo and brought in more one dimensional players like Valencia and Owen they became a bit more rigid with less fluid play and interchanging and he made another CL final and won a few more leagues.

He’d struggle to topple this pep side but the rest wouldn’t be a match for him.

Corrrr that cuts me deep as an Arsenal fan. Done us time and time again with these tactics towards the latter end of his career. Park always picked us off on the counter 

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Claudiogel Pearnieri

 

It's really difficult to pin down who, really, was responsible. Leicester 15/16 was a perfect storm, it had taken years to come together. Ranieri would never have won the league without Pearson's groundwork but then Pearson would never have won the league himself without Ranieri's adjustments to our style.

Still, what we witnessed that year wasn't a "fairy tale" or a "miracle", all of that talk was nonsense and quite frankly offensive. It made it sound like a fluke, like the Gods' had predestined it. That grossly underplays what was quite possibly the best execution of the modern pressing, counter-attacking philosophy seen in European football to date. Jurgen Klopp might have popularised heavy metal football but Vardy, Kante, Huth and co' perfected it if only for a year.

I've been adhering to it's tenets in FM ever since as best as I can.

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I would absolutely love to set up a system similar to that of Chris Wilder @ Sheffield United, the overlapping centre backs is truely a unique style, but correct me if I am wrong this would be difficult/impossible to do with the current match engine.

I have attempted to create something relatively similar with the other aspects of the style Wilder uses on a throwaway save and it seemed to work not too bad considering I am pretty poor playing this game.

His man management style is something I like to try and model all my teams on too.

Basically I love this man haha.

Edited by Reedy_1988

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