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Your managerial "role model" ?

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A simple question: which real-life manager (if any) is your role model when playing FM? And why? Is it about (his) tactics, or the way of handling players, media... maybe personal charisma?

Mine is not Jurgen Klopp (as many of you would probably assume given my favorite club), but Diego Simeone. Main reason is quite simple - I like his approach to tactics :Bowen:

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For me it’s Thomas Tuchel and what he was able to do with first Mainz and then Dortmund. He has some core beliefs with counter pressing and positional play. His Dortmund side in the first season under his reign was really exciting to watch - especially in the start. A fine hybrid between possession and high intense football. What he managed to do in his second and last season with Dortmund was also quite remarkable. The team lost its spine in the summer transfer window, was hurt deep by injuries throughout the season, yet managed a CL-quarter final, CL-qualification and the DFB-Pokal (beat Bayern at Allianz in the semifinal, I think). 

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Im not based on anyone as i develop my own managerial style depending on the club

 

However, i am a big fan of Max Allegri, Sir Alex Ferguson, Jupp Heynckes, the football played under Claudio Ranieri at Leicester (im a leicester fan), also enjoyed the old Wimbledon alot actually too

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Allegri, probably the best in the world at making adjustments in game.

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7 hours ago, Fosse said:

Allegri, probably the best in the world at making adjustments in game.

Emery has been amazing at this for Arsenal. We've yet to lead a game at halftime in the league yet are doing quite well with with 9/14 wins having played City, Chelsea, Everton, Liverpool and Tottenham. 

He made a double change against Tottenham at halftime which saw us come back from 1-2 down to win 4-2. 

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Arrigo Sacchi. I've not implemented his 442 style yet though. I just don't have the players to pull it off successfully.

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Not sure if "role models" is the correct term, but those I read the most about, and take an interest in their tactics and recreating their philosophy: Rafa Benitez, Carlo Ancelotti, and Jurgen Klopp.

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I take inspiration from many manager like the ones already mentioned above. After watching documentaries of Juventus and Manchester City it's easy to see why Allegri and Guardiola are that good. Just outstanding characters.

I'd like to add Nagelsmann, Quique Setién and most of all Pochettino to the list.

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Sir Alex Ferguson.

No one will have his staying power and capacity to evolve tactically, or to get the best out of what many will perceive to be average players. Despite being one of the best and longest managers out there, I think he is criminally underrated by many when it comes to his tactical exploits, something I think a few people are starting to revise given United's fortunes of late.

 

I always try to last as long as he does by being a one-club man. Unfortunately, I'm not quite so tactically flexible as he was.. :P

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18 minutes ago, isignedupfornorealreason said:

Sir Alex Ferguson.

No one will have his staying power and capacity to evolve tactically, or to get the best out of what many will perceive to be average players. Despite being one of the best and longest managers out there, I think he is criminally underrated by many when it comes to his tactical exploits, something I think a few people are starting to revise given United's fortunes of late.

 

I always try to last as long as he does by being a one-club man. Unfortunately, I'm not quite so tactically flexible as he was.. :P

I respect SAF a lot but he wasn't a tactical manager to have evolved so much. He kept it simple in that department. His strength was in man-management, motivation, judging players ability and potential.

His staying power can also be attributed to the board he had at United and the lack of other good managers (apart from Wenger) compared to now. As soon as an young ambitious manager like Mourinho came in 2004, him and Wenger took a back stage. Imagine now if he had to take on Pep, Klopp, Pochettino and Emery at the same time.

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12 minutes ago, yonko said:

I respect SAF a lot but he wasn't a tactical manager to have evolved so much. He kept it simple in that department. His strength was in man-management, motivation, judging players ability and potential.

His staying power can also be attributed to the board he had at United and the lack of other good managers (apart from Wenger) compared to now. As soon as an young ambitious manager like Mourinho came in 2004, him and Wenger took a back stage. Imagine now if he had to take on Pep, Klopp, Pochettino and Emery at the same time.

Honestly, i think he would have adapted. You must remember that he changed twice when Wenger came to beat Arsenal then when Jose came he changed again, Hell even with Carlo and Manchini he made changed to overcome these sides.

What you can really say about SAF is that he absolutely destroyed teams that he should beat and very rarely dropped points against them something that Conte and Pep excel at doing. And when you talk about not losing to rivals, he always found away to pull out a draw. 

Back on topic tho, Cruyff is my biggest inspiration his methods, playing style, philosophy then Pep, Sachi, Sarri, and Jose. 

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Yeah, SAF adapted all the time, roughly every three or four years - whether in reaction to another manager or whether to freshen up/adapt to a new player (Cantona, Van Nistelrooy, Van Persie).

His core philosophy stayed pretty consistent ("The best way to defend a one-goal lead is to score a second") but team and style changed regularly.

As for influences?

Me, I am the Special One, I have won promotions, won the EPL, won Champions Leagues and when I'm not in the Champs League I win the Europa League - or go and have my dinner depending on the mood my wife is in.

Other than the SAF approach I mentioned above, I don;t really try and emulate a particular manager I don't think. I am one who tries to get the best out of whatever squad I start the game with and build from there. I don;t have a favoured formation or style, although I usually end up with 4-1-4-1DM Wide (4123) as at least one of the tactics.

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21 minutes ago, Robson 07 said:

Oh @yonko :D.  Good one.  I'm going to say he wasn't so bad, you know. :cool:

I didn't say he was bad. Don't twist my words, please.

19 minutes ago, Amarante said:

Honestly, i think he would have adapted. You must remember that he changed twice when Wenger came to beat Arsenal then when Jose came he changed again, Hell even with Carlo and Manchini he made changed to overcome these sides.

What you can really say about SAF is that he absolutely destroyed teams that he should beat and very rarely dropped points against them something that Conte and Pep excel at doing. And when you talk about not losing to rivals, he always found away to pull out a draw. 

Back on topic tho, Cruyff is my biggest inspiration his methods, playing style, philosophy then Pep, Sachi, Sarri, and Jose. 

 

5 minutes ago, Snorks said:

Yeah, SAF adapted all the time, roughly every three or four years - whether in reaction to another manager or whether to freshen up/adapt to a new player (Cantona, Van Nistelrooy, Van Persie).

His core philosophy stayed pretty consistent ("The best way to defend a one-goal lead is to score a second") but team and style changed regularly.

As for influences?

Me, I am the Special One, I have won promotions, won the EPL, won Champions Leagues and when I'm not in the Champs League I win the Europa League - or go and have my dinner depending on the mood my wife is in.

Other than the SAF approach I mentioned above, I don;t really try and emulate a particular manager I don't think. I am one who tries to get the best out of whatever squad I start the game with and build from there. I don;t have a favoured formation or style, although I usually end up with 4-1-4-1DM Wide (4123) as at least one of the tactics.

IMO he had hard time adapting to Mourinho and Pep. Part of the reason why he quit. He saw the younger and hungrier managers coming up, considered his old age and he knew the limit of his United team and where the future of the game was going. He realized one of the best rules - quit while you've won a title.

Sorry, I don't mean to turn this into SAF debate. So that's all I'm going to say.

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I discovered the football with Arrigo Sacchi and became a huge fan of AC Milan when he was the manager. I couldn't play any CM/FM without his philosophy. You know : high pressure and compact team...


That's why I can't manage some teams in the game. I need this sort of players.

 

Grazie mille Arrigo Sacchi.

Edited by sebastiano

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I am a Mourinho man. Pragmatic football built predominantly on defence and being solid. I see nothing wrong with setting up my side - no matter how good - defensively to get a result that could be critical later in the season. Plus, I like to shout at players for no reason!

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21 hours ago, yonko said:

IMO he had hard time adapting to Mourinho and Pep. Part of the reason why he quit.

At the age of 71, I feel that he genuinely retired.  A nicer word than quit.

21 hours ago, yonko said:

Sorry, I don't mean to turn this into SAF debate.

Of course you didn't.

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13 hours ago, sporadicsmiles said:

I am a Mourinho man. Pragmatic football built predominantly on defence and being solid. I see nothing wrong with setting up my side - no matter how good - defensively to get a result that could be critical later in the season. Plus, I like to shout at players for no reason!

You hurled a drink carrier yet?

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Since he came to Napoli, Maurizio Sarri has fascinated me, a former banker who started at the bottom and worked his way up to Serie A.  Now, that he’s at Chelsea everything is complete. 

Mr. Sarri is not big in the transfer market, nor is he one for rotation, not great for FM, but his ideas on improving players via training and his tactics work great for FM.  IRL he’s making football fun again and his fun is infectious!

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In real life: Maurizio Sarri, Andre Villas Boas. 4-3-3 sexy football.

In Football Manager: Özil to the Arsenal. Very Fluid sexy football.

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On 03/12/2018 at 23:40, yonko said:

I respect SAF a lot but he wasn't a tactical manager to have evolved so much. He kept it simple in that department. His strength was in man-management, motivation, judging players ability and potential.

His staying power can also be attributed to the board he had at United and the lack of other good managers (apart from Wenger) compared to now. As soon as an young ambitious manager like Mourinho came in 2004, him and Wenger took a back stage. Imagine now if he had to take on Pep, Klopp, Pochettino and Emery at the same time.

A bit harsh that. He took a back seat for 2 seasons when Jose arrived and then won 3 leagues on the bounce and another European cup.

That side also showed real tactical evolution as well. They were very well organized and lethal on the counter in big away games in the league and in Europe compared to his previous sides . He used Park Ji Sung fantastically in a lot of those type of games as well.

When he lost Tevez and Ronaldo and brought in more one dimensional players like Valencia and Owen they became a bit more rigid with less fluid play and interchanging and he made another CL final and won a few more leagues.

He’d struggle to topple this pep side but the rest wouldn’t be a match for him.

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10 minutes ago, VinceLombardi said:

John Madden. 

Don't worry about the horse being blind, just load the wagon.

Great summariser in the commentary box old John, and Pat.

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Just now, Robson 07 said:

Don't worry about the horse being blind, just load the wagon.

This is the pep talk I give my players when I take over a team.

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Sir Alex.

Able to change from a counter attacking 4-4-2 to a fluid and sexy 4-3-3 then mastering the 4-2-3-1/4-5-1. All while giving fair shouts to youth and acadamy players and getting far more out of limited players than anyone could reasonably expect. Also managed under what could be considered Austerity under the Glazers, which I think people often overlook when you think of the money coming in to the players being bought (Ronaldo sold for 80m, Valencia signed for 16m springs to mind). He fought and beat the sugar daddy teams, adapting so many times and in so many ways.

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18 hours ago, TheJanitor said:

I find it odd that Ferguson got this rep for not being tactically astute. While man management and squad building were his absolute strengths, he wouldn't be able to enjoy the success he did without being a brilliant tactician. 

He wasn't tactically incompetent, but I wouldn't call him brilliant tactician either. He was sufficient in that part of the game. His strengths is what kept him successful in the game so long. 

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10 minutes ago, yonko said:

He wasn't tactically incompetent, but I wouldn't call him brilliant tactician either. He was sufficient in that part of the game. His strengths is what kept him successful in the game so long. 

Of course SAF was a brilliant tactician. He might not swing his hands and arms and legs during games like others but his side was brilliant setup. He might not be an innovator like Cruyff but calling SAF "sufficent" tactically is ... well, I dont agree. He might not have had an extreme playing style like Guardiola or Klopp (or at least he used to have), instead he could get his team to master several aspects of football and he formed the tactic to his players - Park being one example.

To me, SAF is the most complete manager in modern times. No question. What he build at Manchester is so impressive, and you can see how much they miss him now - and that's coming from me, a fan of LFC. Ferguson did what most couldnt - he survived time.

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3 hours ago, yonko said:

He wasn't tactically incompetent, but I wouldn't call him brilliant tactician either. He was sufficient in that part of the game. His strengths is what kept him successful in the game so long. 

Absolutely agree with the second part, but to say that he was "sufficient" tactician is a bit selling him short, considering what he accomplished in his career.

Edited by TheJanitor

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4 hours ago, Gegenklaus said:

What he build at Manchester is so impressive, and you can see how much they miss him now - and that's coming from me, a fan of LFC

From me too :thup:

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@yonko I 100% agree that SAF would struggle to take on these tactical minds.

I mean, SAF struggled against Mourinho and even Wenger for many years. The main reason his rivalry with Wenger became one sided in the end was due to external factors such as Arsenal's new stadium and club philosophy at the time. Arsenal weren't necessarily trying to win the title from roughly 2007 onwards. 

The likes of Guardiola, Klopp, Poch, Emery, Mourinho and even Marco Silva would really be a challenge for him. And I don't think he'd fare very well.

Edited by NabsKebabs

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It's been weird but initially I was looking up to Pep Guardiola as a manager but I've shifted in favor of Jose Mourinho. Maybe I've gotten old (lol) or maybe because recently I've been studying about defensive and counter-attacking systems and gained huge respect for the amount of preparation and tactical insight a side needs just to "park the bus".

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16 hours ago, NabsKebabs said:

@yonko I 100% agree that SAF would struggle to take on these tactical minds.

I mean, SAF struggled against Mourinho and even Wenger for many years. The main reason his rivalry with Wenger became one sided in the end was due to external factors such as Arsenal's new stadium and club philosophy at the time. Arsenal weren't necessarily trying to win the title from roughly 2007 onwards. 

The likes of Guardiola, Klopp, Poch, Emery, Mourinho and even Marco Silva would really be a challenge for him. And I don't think he'd fare very well.

He did have problems with Pep in two finals. He chose to not deny space for Messi, Xavi and Iniesta as someone like Mourinho would or did.

Wenger was a little bit more tactically astute but I wouldn't call him tactician either. He never really addressed the loss of key players and try to play without proper holding midfielder for years. Gilberto was the last one probably.

EDIT: But I give him credit for turning Henry from winger into a goalscoring striker everyone feared.

Edited by yonko

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On ‎04‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 00:20, yonko said:

Sorry, I don't mean to turn this into SAF debate. So that's all I'm going to say.

How's that going mate? :D:D:D

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4 hours ago, yonko said:

He did have problems with Pep in two finals. He chose to not deny space for Messi, Xavi and Iniesta as someone like Mourinho would or did.

Wenger was a little bit more tactically astute but I wouldn't call him tactician either. He never really addressed the loss of key players and try to play without proper holding midfielder for years. Gilberto was the last one probably.

EDIT: But I give him credit for turning Henry from winger into a goalscoring striker everyone feared.

Agree, Wenger was not a tactician. This was proven in his last few years at Arsenal when the club had a strong squad and resources. Wenger was more of a football philosopher, not a tactician. Unfortunately, the tactician wins, as the tactician ensures the players know exactly what to do, while the philosopher assumes the players know what to do within the framework of a philosophy. 

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Sir Alex Ferguson’s is the greatest of all time for me at the moment. What he achieved in Scotland with Aberdeen I don’t think will ever be replicated by anyone outside the old firm and what he done at man united was special (even though am a Newcastle fan) he got the best out of players tactically adapt threw 2 decades  which I think is now José problem he can’t adapt to what’s changed in the game recently.I may be bias being scottish myself .

I really admire Klopp and his style and passion as sheer enthusiasm and energy and is the style am trying to implicate now long term.

But I think Pep will eventually surpass everyone his attention to detail is surreal. He is addicted to football some people even say he has ocd with it. And he plays it in the purest form. 

Think ranieri deserves mention because what he done with Leicester was nothing short of a miracle  

 

 

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Bobby Robson.

Not a great cold tactician, but i like when, like in Barca, he left freedom creativity.

And then he was good to developped players.

 

 

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Maurizio Sarri. He left his well paid job in the bank and followed passion to be a coach in low level teams and look where he is right now. 

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On 02/12/2018 at 18:33, Experienced Defender said:

A simple question: which real-life manager (if any) is your role model when playing FM? And why? Is it about (his) tactics, or the way of handling players, media... maybe personal charisma?

Mine is not Jurgen Klopp (as many of you would probably assume given my favorite club), but Diego Simeone. Main reason is quite simple - I like his approach to tactics :Bowen:

In both FM and Real life, Marcelo Bielsa. I love his dedication to tactics as well and uncompromising nature on those tactics, while being flexible. I also love his style of play. Sarri, Michaels and Cruyff are close seconds

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I like Lucien Favre a lot.I think he is very underrated as a head coach.Just look at his history :

Zurich - won them two titles in a row after 25 years of break

Hertha BSC - bring them to top4 in Bundesliga

Gladbach - in the first season he saved them from relegatior playoff and then in the second season he got top 4

Nice - Almost winning the title against PSG . 3rd place but fighting for title till the end of the season

Dortmund - he's going to win the title.

His vision for football is amazing imo.One of the bestattacking minded coach in history.

 

 

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In terms of active managers, Pochettino for me. I enjoy his high energy style combined with an insistence on playing the ball out of defense. I don't take the ideas to extremes however as someone like Bielsa would, I feel that after a certain point it's ineffective to blindly believe in one particular style and situationally I adjust tactics.

In terms of past managers, I also admire Cruyff's totaalvoetbal after reading his autobiography. I'm torn over whether I enjoy his preferred 1-2 midfield triangle setup to Poch's mainstay of 2-1.

Unfortunately I find that the current match engine doesn't allow the ideas of either of these managers to be effectively implemented, so I'm on hiatus until 19.2 comes out. Hopefully we will see player movement and decision-making conducive to passing football, as well as more intelligent pressing behavior.

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11 hours ago, BoGdy said:

I like Lucien Favre a lot.I think he is very underrated as a head coach.Just look at his history :

Zurich - won them two titles in a row after 25 years of break

Hertha BSC - bring them to top4 in Bundesliga

Gladbach - in the first season he saved them from relegatior playoff and then in the second season he got top 4

Nice - Almost winning the title against PSG . 3rd place but fighting for title till the end of the season

Dortmund - he's going to win the title.

His vision for football is amazing imo.One of the bestattacking minded coach in history.

 

 

What is his football vision? Some Barca fans want him to replace Valverde.

9 hours ago, Cupjake said:

In terms of past managers, I also admire Cruyff's totaalvoetbal after reading his autobiography. I'm torn over whether I enjoy his preferred 1-2 midfield triangle setup to Poch's mainstay of 2-1.

Which midfield set up do you think is more attacking - 1-2 or 2-1?

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