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England's World Cup 23

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3 hours ago, ryan045 said:

With Walker at RCB it changes us into a back 4 almost. Trip pier becomes the free man down the right side. I’m not sure how effective that will be though.

His crosses are really decent and while he's not as fast as Walker, he is no slouch (tbf not many are as fast as Walker). I remember there were shouts of experimenting Trippier at right wing & Walker at right back when they were both at Spurs, just so both could get game time. I could see it as being very effective, especially Trippier's crossing. Calling up Trent as his back-up here makes sense, his crossing aint half bad as well.

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https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/sport/world-cup-harry-maguire-and-jesse-lingard-set-to-start-opener-3bbst0g87

 

 

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Gareth Southgate is considering handing nine players their World Cup debuts in England’s opening game with Tunisia, including Harry Maguire, who watched the country’s previous appearance at a major finals as a fan.

The England manager will pick a bold, attacking line-up for the game on Monday evening, with Ashley Young, Jesse Lingard and Kieran Trippier featuring alongside Maguire, who travelled to France to watch Euro 2016 with his friends.

That campaign ended in humiliation with a defeat by Iceland and, given the extent of the overhaul of the national team by Southgate since then, only four survivors from that game are likely to start in Volgograd.

Marcus Rashford sat out training for a second successive day at England’s base in Repino and, in his absence, Southgate, the manager, continued working on the team’s shape before their group G opener by splitting his squad into two teams.

It is understood that Trippier, Kyle Walker, John Stones, Maguire and Young lined up in defence on one side, with Jordan Henderson, Dele Alli and Lingard in midfield. Raheem Sterling was deployed off Kane.

Southgate has three days to fine-tune his plans, and must decide whether to pick Maguire or the more experienced Gary Cahill, and choose between Young and Danny Rose. Jordan Pickford is expected to play in goal.

The formation he used in practice yesterday at the Spartak Zelenogorsk stadium is designed to be brimming with pace, and focuses on players who are comfortable on the ball.

“Southgate has come in with the mentality [that if you] play with freedom, play without fear, you will enjoy your time more,” Lingard said. “So that is what we are going to do — enjoy our football, play with no fear and play exciting football at the same time.”

The only survivors from the Iceland debacle are likely to be the captain, Harry Kane, Sterling, Alli and Walker. Sterling and Henderson, who is set to start as a sole midfield pivot, are the only players to have been to a World Cup.

Rashford’s knee injury is an issue for Southgate, however. The Manchester United striker stayed behind at England’s Forrestmix hotel to work with Steve Kemp, the physiotherapist.

The 20-year-old is expected to train with the main group for the first time in Russia today, and with England’s opening match three days away, the likelihood of Sterling starting instead has increased.

England and Rashford continue to insist that the injury is not serious. Having underlined his claims with a stunning goal and an effervescent all-round display in last week’s final warm-up win over Costa Rica at Elland Road, his supporters will hope that he will have a chance to build on that.

 

 

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Aww, they're so flipping young though! Like teenagers! 

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From the times

 

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The players reported to St George’s Park, first thing on a Friday, and were told to go straight to a dressing room. Through its door stepped a Royal Marine. Leave everything, even phones, he said, don’t tell anyone where you’re going. And so Harry Kane and Raheem Sterling and the others, plus Gareth Southgate and further Football Association staff, boarded a bus and did the long slog from Staffordshire to Lympstone in Devon. They arrived at the Marines’ Commando Training Centre, changed in a gym and went out on Woodbury Common. There was a five-mile yomp, and an assault course so tough that non-athletes were nearly sick.

Then the severest test: being pushed under muddy water and pulled through a tunnel, fully submerged. Arms forward, trust your instructors and let go, players were told. They were warned of the marine who once got it wrong and got stuck, almost dying before the tunnel was drained and he was freed. The group camped in woods. An excited John Stones yakked all night, keeping up those in the neighbouring tents. Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain thrived so much he seemed genuine soldier material. Everyone embraced the trip, and at the end some words from Southgate left a mark.

This was June 2017, before playing Scotland and France. “But don’t think coming here was about the next two games,” Southgate said, “it’s about the next 12 months. The World Cup.” Now England are there and it is time for all that mettle that they have been striving to accrue to be tested. Stubborn Tunisia, in sweltering Volgograd, is the start.

Adversity training has been in the FA’s thinking since England’s collapse of character against Iceland on that grisly day at Euro 2016. Technical director Dan Ashworth has led an enlightened process of reviewing past tournament failures and learning from youth-level successes. There has been a focus on England’s problems in knockout matches, penalty shoot-outs and all that, but there is another point in tournament play where the adversity level always rises and that is opening games — in which England have the most dismal record.

Played 23 and won just five, since 1950, is how it stands. England’s last success in opening matches came five tournaments ago — and even then it was a struggling 1-0 victory over Paraguay in 2006 which sucked the optimism from Sven’s Golden Generation. Even 1966 started with a squib, a stalemate with Uruguay.

Ashworth and Southgate have not developed any specific strategies for opening games but are trusting better preparation and strides made on the psychological side will stand England in good stead in Volgograd. Certainly something has to change, for what versatile exponents of the first game balls-up England have proved down the years. They have failed against a plethora of opponents, in a full monty of locations: by the banks of the Amazon, in the African outback, in an oligarch’s metropolis and in old Marseilles — against Italy, USA, France and Russia — and that’s just since 2010. Stretching further back, they have lost to France, Portugal, Ireland and Hungary; drawn with Belgium, Denmark and Sweden. In 2010, even Jozy Altidore terrorised them.

If there has been a pattern to the debacles it has been England starting brightly and generally taking a lead, before growing cautious, then nervy, then accident-prone. At Euro 2016 they dominated a plodding Russia, scored and then, panicking under some minor and belated pressure, contrived to lose the latest ever goal scored in a group stage European Championship game, to a simple cross and header. At some finals, the problem has been England not discovering their best selection and tactics until later games. At others, they have failed to do their homework. Adapting to new conditions has been a regular issue.

Southgate is clear about his players and system, however, and his 3-5-2 offers England improved control of possession and space, and therefore games. His set-up looks England’s best, tactically, since 1998 when he was a player and part of an opening-game victory — against Tunisia. But preparation and psychology are where England are looking most to change their luck. It was sobering to hear Danny Rose compare the prep for tomorrow’s game to that under Roy Hodgson two years ago. “Some of the preparations at the Euros I would have liked to have done differently,” he said. “Especially for the Iceland game. What we were doing in training was completely different to how Iceland played. I can say, now, that everything we’ve done in training here has been exactly what we’ve seen in the videos of Tunisia, so there can be no excuses, no arguments. The gaffer’s given us all the right tools to be ready.”

Preparation underpinned England’s annus mirabilis at junior level in 2017. When England won the world under-17 title in India the FA brought India’s manager, Stephen Constantine, to St George’s Park to pick his brains on aspects such as local culture and diet. Nine months before winning the world under-20 title in South Korea, England’s team visited the host country to play three friendlies. Before victory at the European under-19 championship in Georgia, where temperatures exceeded 40 degrees, England went to Spain for hot-weather training. England’s opening game results in those tournaments: 4-0 v Chile, 3-0 v Argentina, 2-0 v Bulgaria.

They are not talking up their chances, knowing results could render that silly, but Southgate, Ashworth and the FA staff are quietly optimistic they have got it right with the informal vibe of their base in Repino. “I remember, leading up to the Euros, it wasn’t as relaxed and there was a lot more tension. And we all know what happened,” said Marcus Rashford.

An important figure around the camp is Dr Pippa Grange, appointed in November as the FA’s head of people and team development. Initially it was not envisaged she would come to Russia but she has proved so valuable to Southgate and the squad culture he wants to create that she is in Repino. She is said to play a vital role in players such as Rose opening up with each other, and the wider world, and sharing their stories. A psychologist by training, with a background in Australian sport, she chats to players individually or in groups, leading discussions on difficult issues such as racism.

She writes books on ethical leadership, believes in the “unity of body and mind” athletes must aim for and evangelises “the transformative power of yoga”. England culture has come a long way from the squad gathering in Gazza’s room to watch him chuck hotel soaps at ducks beneath his window during Italia 1990.

Tunisia are energetic, organised and fairly youthful, with several players developed or playing in France’s Ligue 1. They should be like reasonable Europa League opposition, producing a reasonable standard — perhaps similar to the United States in 2010 — that will catch England out if they are off-key.

Ashley Young is set to play ahead of Rose, Harry Maguire instead of Gary Cahill and Southgate’s marginal midfield call — Jordan Henderson or Eric Dier — looks like going Henderson’s way. Forgoing Rose and his ability, as a left-footer, to go on the outside on his flank would be the quibble if the selection goes this way.

Commando training? Southgate is wary of linking sport and the military, but a hero of his was his grandfather, Arthur Toll, a Royal Marine, and “adapt, improvise and overcome” has become a marine slogan thanks to Clint Eastwood’s movie Heartbreak Ridge. Adapt, improvise and overcome: it is what Southgate knows England must do in their opening match, and before the squad departed for Russia, four marines came to speak to them. All had suffered severe combat injuries but were pushing on with life; one, Lee Spencer, despite losing a leg, is preparing to sail the Atlantic. “He’s been through adversity and it’s not going to stop him,” said Rose. Time to conquer those opening-game nerves. It’s only football.

 

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Glenn Hoddle is doing a column in the mail on sundays. As the eurosport article on Englands perfromance in France 1998 showed, Hoddle was tactically superb but had the man management skills of a mouldy tangerine, so whilst I wouldn't want to see him managing my club, I'm always interested in his views on tactics.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-5852223/Stones-Dier-Maguire-better-ball-players-including-Southgate.html

 

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Playing for England is the peak of your career. And playing in the World Cup, as I managed to in 1982 and 1986, was a wonderful experience. 

But I would also have to admit that my overriding memory is being over-run in midfield in variants of a rigid 4-4-2 system. And my frustration as balls were delivered over my head and we conceded possession.

I’m very proud of my England caps and my World Cup appearances. But I feel that we could have done more.

So when I became England manager I vowed that my teams would always have an extra man in midfield. And, for English players, I felt that a back three facilitated that. Which is why I’m hopeful on the eve of England’s World Cup.

How I would have loved to have played in a system like this, with the ball being played into feet and linking with players such as John Stones.

When I was in tournaments, I would be stood in midfield, knowing I was in a good position to open up the game. But I also knew my defenders wouldn’t see me. That’s not being disrespectful, but we had a different kind of defender and system. They were coached to play long balls.

With Stones, Eric Dier or Harry Maguire, you’d be confident they would see you. And make the pass and we could do some damage.

That split-second vision is what turns a slow performance into an incisive, exciting one. And what England have missed for years.

Gareth Southgate played under Terry Venables and for me, and we were the first England managers to use a back three regularly. Bobby Robson switched to a back three in the second game of the 1990 World Cup. With a new freedom, the players went on to record our best ever World Cup overseas.

Terry Venables went into Euro 96 with a back four but the team had practised with a back three and switched to that against Scotland and Germany, who we were unfortunate not to beat in the semi-final. Again, with 1990, that’s our most successful tournament since 1966.

I think Gareth enjoyed using that system and that perhaps it influenced him when he switched the way England play in November. It certainly makes me more hopeful. We have a very young squad and we don’t have the depth of previous generations. But we do have a system which seems to get the best out of our talent. And that’s a major step forward.

Subvert stereotypes

I was blessed with some excellent defenders when I played a back three for England, including Gareth. At the World Cup in 1998, it was Gary Neville on the right, Tony Adams central and Sol Campbell on the left. Gareth could play anywhere in that three and started right side against Tunisia in the opening game.

In the famous game in Rome against Italy in qualifying, where we drew 0-0 and which some people have said was one of England’s best defensive performances, Gareth was on the right, Tony central and Sol on the left. I set up the team that way because I wanted to play out from the back.

But Gareth’s back three are much better on the ball. They’re not better defenders, mind. But these players will see a picture of the game quicker and are very comfortable on the ball. Many foreign opponents won’t be expecting that.

A standard feature of any team playing England would be to let a certain defender have the ball, knowing they can’t play, and pick on him. When he gets the ball, that would be the trigger to press. You can’t do that with these players.

They can play and we shouldn’t have a problem with getting the ball to midfield quickly. But I’d prefer Stones on the right. He’s the best at bringing the ball out and playing a pass. If he’s central, he’ll be picking up their one striker and, in a sense, wasted. He won’t have as many chances to bring the ball out as the right-sided defender. And Stones is better at that than Kyle Walker. I’d take Eric Dier in the centre of defence, Stones on the right and Walker at wing-back. Stones hits a wonderful diagonal ball. And it’s a big miss if he can’t deliver it often.

Think on your feet

Encouraging as the first half against Nigeria was, the second half was dispiriting. When they matched our system with a back three, we had no answer. If a team do go with three at the back, it’s essential that the wing back comes off his perch. He has to come inside, like Pep Guardiola’s full-backs do, and overload in midfield. Then the midfielders go outside to create movement and confusion.

Against Nigeria we just played in straight lines, matching their system, and couldn’t get past them one on one. Dan Petrescu was the best at this for me at Chelsea. If he saw them playing the same shape, he’d come inside and get the ball because his opposing wing-back wouldn’t dare follow him.

England’s wing-backs didn’t do that. We just played the same system in straight lines and now had runners following us everywhere and so couldn’t find the space.

Change the record

England’s record in their first game in major tournaments is exceptionally poor. Since we beat Chile in our first ever World Cup game in 1950 we’ve won only four more (Romania, 1970; France. 1982; Tunisia, 1998; Paraguay, 2006) in all tournaments, including Euros!

I’ve experienced losing the first game, in 1986, against Portugal. And it casts a shadow over the whole camp, putting you all under pressure. But I was manager for the 1998 game against Tunisia and Gareth played in it.

4D5030B900000578-0-image-a-38_1529180700

I know there is a mantra: don’t lose your first game. But our view was that we were better than them and could beat them. Paul Scholes was exceptional that day, scoring in perhaps his best performance for England, playing just behind Teddy Sheringham and Alan Shearer.

He was making those runs we’ve talked about needing from Dele Alli and Jesse Lingard, creating havoc in the pockets of space that open up.

I had Paul Ince, with David Batty sitting behind him, but we’d get Paul to make those runs as well, especially if he found himself ahead of Ince. You need to make his marker work as well. If he just sits, then his opponent knows he has an easy day. That’s important for Jordan Henderson to remember. It was so hot and we knew we could not press hard for 90 minutes. We had to do it in phases.

Ignore the noise

There were riots in the streets the night before and the day of that game against Tunisia in Marseille. It was a particularly volatile atmosphere with a large population with family and roots from North Africa living there. England fans and locals fought running battles.

Of course, it saddened me, as my playing career was dogged by England fans behaving badly. Even though this situation was different, with England not always the aggressors, it made you feel like the enemy. Hopefully, there will be no repeat. As a team, you stay steadfast in what you’re planning and put it out of your mind.

Unleash Marcus

Harry Kane getting off the mark and a clean sheet would be the best start possible for England. To get your main striker scoring eases the burden on everyone. If I’m being greedy, I’d love for Raheem Sterling to score. He’s got only two goals in 38 caps. What a time to start scoring for England.

But I’m also hoping to see something of Marcus Rashford after his performance against Costa Rica. It wasn’t just the goal; it was his confidence and skills to beat people in the right areas and first-time lay-offs. Everything he did, he did with confidence and panache — something he doesn’t have at United.

4D502FF000000578-0-image-m-33_1529179806

 

 

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https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-soccer-worldcup-tun-eng-preview/southgate-draws-on-premier-league-for-new-england-approach-idUKKBN1JD09A?utm_campaign=trueAnthem%3A+Trending+Content&utm_content=5b26451104d3013a2534f094&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=facebook

 

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The Premier League has long been a scapegoat for England’s below-par performances at major tournaments but manager Gareth Southgate says he has benefited from close study of the tactics used by its foreign coaches.

England start their World Cup campaign against Tunisia on Monday with a formation Southgate believes will play to their strengths of pace and attacking flair.

“We’ve got some of the best coaches in the world working in our league so there are some fascinating ideas,” Southgate told the FA’s website.

“The more you watch a team, the more you start to see familiar patterns of play and how they build up. The season has been a great contrast of styles and philosophies,” he added.

Much has been made of the impact of Manchester City’s Spanish coach Pep Guardiola on players like Kyle Walker, John Stones and Raheem Sterling but Southgate’s system owes more to the approach of Italian Antonio Conte at Chelsea.

The London club won the Premier League in 2017 playing with three central defenders and two advanced wing-backs – a central striker and a floating winger/support forward in Eden Hazard.

That is essentially the formula Southgate is expected to use in the World Cup with Kieran Trippier and Ashley Young likely to occupy the wing-back positions which Conte used to such good effect with Victor Moses and Marcos Alonso.

While Guardiola and Liverpool’s Juergen Klopp also make use of attacking full backs, they do so as part of more traditional back fours whereas Southgate is adopting Conte’s preference for three central defenders.

That requires a different kind of centre-half, capable of covering the wider areas when a counter-attack – hence the use of Walker on the right and probably Harry Maguire on the left.

It is no carbon copy of Conte’s approach though – whereas the Italian often used two holding midfielders in N’Golo Kante and Nemanja Matic, Southgate is expected to go with one in the form of Jordan Henderson.

Sterling is likely to be given the “Hazard role” in support of striker Harry Kane with Jesse Lingard and Dele Alli providing attacking support from midfield.

Southgate, who coached England’s Under-21 team, has tried different systems but says the common factor is a desire to get the most quality on the pitch.

“Predominantly, when I started with the U21s, it was 4-2-3-1 for a spell. Then in order to get our best players on the pitch, we played with a diamond for an 18-month period when we won the Toulon tournament. Now we’ve moved to three at the back with the seniors.

“Essentially, you’re trying to get your best players on the field in a formation that allows them to play at their very best and allows you to win matches – because sooner or later you have to win games,” he said.

It is a system that makes England well suited to counter-attacking and playing in high-tempo matches. But perhaps it makes Southgate’s side better suited to facing stronger sides than less ambitious opponents who will look to defend in numbers and slow games down.

Southgate has a young and dynamic group of players but English footballers have rarely looked comfortable in slow, possession based games. The first two opponents in Group G, Tunisia and Panama, will likely try to limit the opportunities for breaks, reduce space and slow the tempo.

The first major test for Southgate’s philosophy will be whether his team can impose their desire for an open, attacking contest on their opponents.

 

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Too many England threads..

This is never going to make it into the HOF like the Greece one from 2004 if we don't keep up the giddyness! 

 

Getting ahead of ourselves, well why not - Is anyone keeping an eye the potential next round game?

 

Just reading up about and we'll end up playing someone from Group H.  Whoever we play in that group I think we'd be favourites to progress.  Poland put in one of the worst performances in the cup so far, so if that's all they have I'd be happy to play them.  Colombia looked pretty pedestrian too, but think they have more to come and will probably win their next 2 games providing they keep everyone on the pitch!  We should beat Japan without much bother, but I'd be worried if we drew Senegal - they looked a decent unit and are pretty fearless. 

Group H looks like this currently

Team Played Won Drawn Lost GD Points
Senegal 1 1 0 0 2 3
Japan 1 1 0 0 1 3
Poland 1 0 0 1 -1 0
Colombia 1 0 0 1 -1 0

  

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Oh, and if England win the group and go through the last 16, the q/f is on a Friday night.  Finishing second means it'll be on a Saturday :thdn:

 

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Is there supposed to be some connection between that picture and the line up that has been posted?

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5 minutes ago, Razzler said:

Is there supposed to be some connection between that picture and the line up that has been posted?

The names :brock:

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We'll definitely win if we play Kane, Rashford, Vardy and Welbeck at the same time

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Names at top is starting XI, the names under would be the replacement option.... 

 

I really like the name Ruben

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7 minutes ago, Mark H said:

I really like the name Ruben

I really like the sandwich of the same name

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1 hour ago, m_fenton said:

The names :brock:

Ah, I see, top/bottom thing

I thought the circling of Vardy/Rashford meant something

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1 hour ago, Razzler said:

 

I thought the circling of Vardy/Rashford meant something

:ackter:

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Interesting stuff on the BBC right now. Southgate feeling a little let down by the media. 

I love Southgate. I want him to be England manager forever! 

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Who are people thinking we should field on Thursday? I think we should field just a few 'regulars' mostly being the core spin so it remains consistent. I'd personally like to see:

Pickford: Jones, Stones, Cahill: TAA, Dier, Henderson, Rose: Sterling: Rashford, Kane (3-4-1-2)

Then injury permiting Kane/Sterling/Hendo to all come off around the hour mark, if not earlier when we're 3-0 up.

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Just now, pearcey_90 said:

Who are people thinking we should field on Thursday? I think we should field just a few 'regulars' mostly being the core spin so it remains consistent. I'd personally like to see:

Pickford: Jones, Stones, Cahill: TAA, Dier, Henderson, Rose: Sterling: Rashford, Kane (3-4-1-2)

Then injury permiting Kane/Sterling/Hendo to all come off around the hour mark, if not earlier when we're 3-0 up.

I know it's rare but I almost agree with you. I just wouldn't play Jones...keep Walker in. Delph on, Welbz on.

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Pickford

Trent

Cahill

Stones

McGuire

Rose

Dier

Ruben

Delph

Rashford

Welbeck

 

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I'd go with this. Keep the spine similar

Pickford

Trent

Cahill

Stones

Jones

Rose

Dier

Henderson

Lingard

Rashford

Kane

 

Then Welbeck, Vardy and Delph of the bench.

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24 minutes ago, pearcey_90 said:

Who are people thinking we should field on Thursday? I think we should field just a few 'regulars' mostly being the core spin so it remains consistent. I'd personally like to see:

Pickford: Jones, Stones, Cahill: TAA, Dier, Henderson, Rose: Sterling: Rashford, Kane (3-4-1-2)

Then injury permiting Kane/Sterling/Hendo to all come off around the hour mark, if not earlier when we're 3-0 up.

------------------- Pickford ----------------
------ Cahill --- Stones --- Maguire ---
Alex.-Arn. ------ Dier -------------- Rose
----------------------------- Delph -----------
---- Sterling ----------------------------------
-------------------- Vardy --- Rashford ---

Keep 3 of the back 4 the same since they're not experienced together, but Cahill in to see how he does and organises the defence if Walker were ever to need to go back on the right.

No need to play Henderson, time for Dier's go.

Straight swaps at wing-back just for game time/rest/experience/match fitness.

Delph probably to start and then swap him or Rose for Loftus-Cheek if we wanna be more attacking.

Sterling will be playing to keep his place in the team, but in his more favoured position. If he flops again against an outside favourite in his preferred position, he has no chance.

Vardy is a flithy chav but I can't help feeling bad for him. Euro 2016 and now 2018, managers refuse to use him for some reason... Unless that's his own fault... Rashford also needs game time, Welbeck doesn't.

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Worth noting that we may well want a cheeky draw with a couple more bookings than Belgium so we can finish second and get a better run in the knockout stages. Still I would rest the wing backs as they do a lot of work and probably bring in dier for Henderson and Cahill for walker to get them some minutes just in case and then Rashford for Sterling. Sorted

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1 hour ago, Baptista_8 said:

I know it's rare but I almost agree with you. I just wouldn't play Jones...keep Walker in. Delph on, Welbz on.

Was thinking about keeping Walker, but rather he not play just incase he gets booked and misses L16 (obviously will still face same scenario for L16 to QF) but want everyone available for L16.

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Walker's on a yellow, no way is he going to be risked in a game that we don't need to win. 

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5 hours ago, Wiggins' Young Boys said:

Still I would rest the wing backs as they do a lot of work and probably bring in dier for Henderson and Cahill for walker to get them some minutes just in case and then Rashford for Sterling. Sorted

couldnt agree more with those changes

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        Pickford

Jones Stones Cahill

TTA                  Rose

          Dier

Delph/Hendo   RLC/Alli (if fit) 

  Kane       Rashford 

 

Keep the goalie, give Jones and Cahill a game to build some match sharpness.

Stones, I feel he doesn't look as sharp as Mguire and could probably do with the minutes. 

TTA - rest our best player and wrap him up in cotton wool (Trippier). Besides, he had his right thigh wrapped up against Panama so might need the recovery time. 

Rose 

Dier - as good as Henderson as been, Dier needs a run out to a) build sharpness if we do decide to play 2 holding midfields against better teams, and b) Hendo's been a machine in the first few games, he probably needs a rest. 

Delph/Hendo - there's the argument that if a player is in form than keep playing them. Having seen him be very average before, compared to what he's done in the first 2 games, it might be beneficial to keep Henderson on. For at least 60 mins or so

RlC/Alli - expect Alli to get some game time. RLC is on a yellow, so might not be risked.

Rashford 

Kane - keep him on. The man doesn't get tired, he'd have to move first. He's got his lucky boots and ****ing magic chin.

 

 

 

Edited by Bliss Seeker

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I'd definitely keep the same keeper, TAA and Rose as wing backs, probably Cahill and Jones and one of the current centre backs (not Walker, probably Stones).

Rashford start, Vardy too, Dier most likely, I'd start RLC again as well, maybe Delph in the middle.

It's a wacky feeling going into the last group game and not really being stressed, isn't it :D

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2 minutes ago, Razzler said:

Good. He's plays practically every minute of every game for spurs, so he's obviously not one to wear out, and besides, he doesn't play in August so has another month's rest on others. 

We need to keep this magic chin peppered with stardust as long as we can.

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Don't mess about with the team and only replace those who are on yellows. Keep everyone else including Kane. I'd rather keep momentum and play the big teams than lose tomorrow and hope for a supposed easier route.

Losing momentum would be the worst thing at this stage, like Russia showed and as pretty much everyone has shown so far the Mexico's and Switzerland's are hardly push overs.

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2 minutes ago, Haguey said:

Keep everyone else including Kane.

Vardy would be a better choice for the Belgium game, tactically speaking (with support from Raheem and Rashford), drop Lingard too and go with Delph/RLC in the middle.

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For definate I'd pick Rose and TAA and also RLC and Rashford, those are my main picks along with someone coming in for Walker at centre back

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15 hours ago, Bliss Seeker said:

Walker's on a yellow, no way is he going to be risked in a game that we don't need to win. 

Loftus-Cheek too. 

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5 minutes ago, Crispypaul said:

Loftus-Cheek too. 

LC to get an hour and Alli half an hour :brock:

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15 hours ago, Bliss Seeker said:

        Pickford

Jones Stones Cahill

TTA                  Rose

          Dier

Delph/Hendo   RLC/Alli (if fit) 

  Kane       Rashford 

 

Keep the goalie, give Jones and Cahill a game to build some match sharpness.

Stones, I feel he doesn't look as sharp as Mguire and could probably do with the minutes. 

TTA - rest our best player and wrap him up in cotton wool (Trippier). Besides, he had his right thigh wrapped up against Panama so might need the recovery time. 

Rose 

Dier - as good as Henderson as been, Dier needs a run out to a) build sharpness if we do decide to play 2 holding midfields against better teams, and b) Hendo's been a machine in the first few games, he probably needs a rest. 

Delph/Hendo - there's the argument that if a player is in form than keep playing them. Having seen him be very average before, compared to what he's done in the first 2 games, it might be beneficial to keep Henderson on. For at least 60 mins or so

RlC/Alli - expect Alli to get some game time. RLC is on a yellow, so might not be risked.

Rashford 

Kane - keep him on. The man doesn't get tired, he'd have to move first. He's got his lucky boots and ****ing magic chin.

 

 

 

This looks pretty spot on to me, except I'd keep Maguire in there because I feel he hasn't been tested against good opposition yet and I want to see how he copes. Probably leave out Jones.

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