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doug m.

Play onto foot?

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When I set opp. instructions, one of the things I really don't understand is the 'play to foot' option. I am not sure what it means, so I have always selected 'play to weaker foot'.

It makes sense, regardless doesn't it? Still, I am a bit uneasy selecting this since the option is given.

What is play to foot, and why would I ever want to play to an opponent's strong foot?

Inquiring minds need to know!

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When I set opp. instructions, one of the things I really don't understand is the 'play to foot' option. I am not sure what it means, so I have always selected 'play to weaker foot'.

It makes sense, regardless doesn't it? Still, I am a bit uneasy selecting this since the option is given.

What is play to foot, and why would I ever want to play to an opponent's strong foot?

Inquiring minds need to know!

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its like when you play against someone who you know is left footed so you always try and shut him down on his right side and make him play with his left foot making him less effective or make mistakes. Its up to you to decide what to do with it but yes generally you'd want to show them onto their weaker foot.

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Alternatively you can use it to shepherd the player into a harmless position. If you are up against a winger who is good at dribbling and finishing, but poor at crossing and passing, you can use it to show him down the channel and force him to try and cross the ball (e.g. show a right winger onto his right foot. It might be his stronger foot anyway, but he is less of a threat if he is doing something he is bad at).

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OK, what I've wondered is this:

What's the difference between playing someone onto their right/left foot and playing them onto their weaker foot? It gives you those three options, and I don't understand why.

Does setting it to "weaker foot" rely on the players themselves to work out which one is weaker?

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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> OK, what I've wondered is this:

What's the difference between playing someone onto their right/left foot and playing them onto their weaker foot? It gives you those three options, and I don't understand why.

Does setting it to "weaker foot" rely on the players themselves to work out which one is weaker? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's what I've always assumed. Surely that's the only reasonable explanation. Or unless it's to catch lazy people out who always go for 'weaker foot' without checking if the player is two-footed or not. icon_cool.gif

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Its "Show Onto Foot" this is one of those things that needs expalining in the manual. I always select "Weaker Foot".

Show onto foot could mean forcing the opposition to use the specified foot, i.e. right winger, right only, hugs line, avoids using weaker foot showing onto weaker foot would force him inside. This is useful for Messi and Adriano.

or it could mean that your player marks that foot preventing the player from using it, in the case stated above, it would allow the player to go to the byline and cross.

I think that it varies as some games you completely shut a player down and other games you must resort to Kevin Keegan tactics (scoring more than you let in) lol.

I hope its the first one, but it needs a clear defination

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