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It does for the next few years at least.

I doubt reserving one space in the starting 11 for English players would fall foul of any EU employment laws. The homegrown quota rule is probably more restrictive there and there have been no issues raised with that.

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Coaching seems to be a big issue, am I right in thinking that to get your badges in this country is significantly more expensive than the other countries on the continent? Surley this FA, by far the most wealthy, can set aside a pot of money to subsidise costs for people wnating to take their badges. It appears only ex-pros or the wealthy can realistically get to the top of the coaching qualification ladder.

I think overall the FA doesn't really want to change anything, the Premier League certainly doesn't financially it is going from strength to strength so why do anything to change that? The FA will make empty promises and tell us they have an idea or a plan and that it will get better but it won't. It's run by business men only concerend witht eh balance sheet at the end of the year. It seems logical to me that a real change and investment in coaching would yield a more self reliant league system that was able to produce it's own players as well as being able to bring in the best talents from abroad.

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There are 99 criticisms you can levy at this England squad but "didn't get much time at youth level" ain't one. Sterling, Stones, Wilshere and Barkley have all had an abundance of opportunities from a very young age at top clubs; they're just not as good as their predecessors. Alli broke through at a lower level - lower than many top nations play professionally - and is every bit as good as them. In Vardy there's even an example of a player who was miles away from being ready for top division football in his youth who's still been able to make it it to the very top. The only player I can think of in the actual squad who might have been held back by not getting many games as a youngster is Sturridge, and that was the least of his problems in preparing for this tournament.

The current team is short of strength and cohesion rather than depth and youth.

What team-transforming talents do we feel are being held back or were ruined by foreigners in Premiership starting lineups? I don't think the difference between failing or succeeding in beating Slovakia and Iceland is regular club starts for Lewis Baker, Dominic Solanke or Nathaniel Chalobah

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I doubt reserving one space in the starting 11 for English players would fall foul of any EU employment laws. The homegrown quota rule is probably more restrictive there and there have been no issues raised with that.
The home grown rule makes no reference to nationality & due to freedom of movement any EU national or other national who has been given leave to reside in the UK can qualify as home grown, the moment you enter in text that restricts a group to a particular nationality you instantly fall foul of EU & as a consequence UK law.
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The ability of Wilshere, Rooney & Henderson to kill the pace of attacking play was telling throughout the tournament, just before Rooney came on in the Slovakia match England had a massive overload counter that was killed as soon as the ball found its way into central midfield, iirc it was Wilshere who just stood on the ball looking for a pass sideways or backwards when there were at least three players on the move & ready to attack acres of space behind Slovakia's almost non- existent defensive line.

Really the big problem was more that the movement of the other players was excessively static. The creative players need more movement off the ball to offload it in any meaningful manner. The tempo of our game was so slow as a result. The only genuine movement off the ball and from deep came from Rose & Walker.

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Probably a bit from column A & some from Column B.

I imagine that players will stop looking to find space if they get fed up with not receiving the ball when they do find some space & then those in possession stop looking for the pass because they get fed up with not seeing players working to create space, all boils down to tactics & training, not just at the tournament but throughout a player's career.

It's telling that Leicester's title appeared to be primarily down to exacting preparation & each player knowing what their job was & also the job of the other players on the pitch in both attacking & defensive phases, it's the tactical understanding in the defensive phase that I believe is the clear weakness in the training at Premier League clubs & with a 100% home based squad that just gets amplified on the international stage.

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The home grown rule makes no reference to nationality & due to freedom of movement any EU national or other national who has been given leave to reside in the UK can qualify as home grown, the moment you enter in text that restricts a group to a particular nationality you instantly fall foul of EU & as a consequence UK law.

Not the case, as it doesn't actually prevent you from employing anyone. The top level of Ice hockey in the UK for example has a maximum limit of 14 non-British players in the match squad. 3 of which have to be EU passport holders, or you can just go with 11 non-EU passport holders. You can still employ as many/few as you want, the rule only applies to how many can be present in the match day squad. It would be the same principal if football here was to implement such rule. (EU referendum fallout notwithstanding)

I think though the main problem is the lack of need for English players to export themselves elsewhere, you look at all the other "top" leagues and as many go to play abroad as they do domestically. Due to all the money available in the English game (on top of the general culture too) this doesn't happen in England. I doubt any of the current "best" English players could hope to get contracts at even half the wage of what they are on now from the likes of a Bayern Munich, Juventus, Atletico Madrid etc and those are sides regularly at or near the top of their domestic game. (On top of all making Champions League Finals.) Yet I doubt many English players would be interested in going to those clubs without their current wage package, and I doubt those clubs would be interested in acquiring them in any event as they wouldn't be suitable enough for their squads.

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That's a lot of players in a match day roster when there are so few on the ice, tough sport.

You're spot on about that limited overseas experience of British players & that not having players outside of the bigger clubs or those who are not first team regulars at the bigger clubs being willing to move abroad is a massive negative, they miss out on broadening their football knowledge in favour of a bigger wage & maybe even being better equipped to deal with being away from home for 4-6 weeks during an international tournament as I image part of the problem is that some players will miss the comforts of home a little too much.

Also the lack of English players competing in the latter stages of the Champions League & Europa League has been a massive hint that the players are missing out on an important aspect of development, if more were willing to move overseas it could only be a positive but then again how many clubs are going to consider signing an English player? I expect the commonly held opinion is that they'd be more trouble than they are worth & would require far too much attention due to the perception of us Brit's being incapable of adjusting to life outside of an English speaking nation.

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A very interseting article has popped upo on F365: http://www.football365.com/news/are-england-too-thick-to-win-anything

Tl;Dr - English footballers are to thick to win anything, and the lack of basic inelligence hinders English footballers.

The source of the article is anecdotal, maybe some merit in the overall point however and is something that plays a significant factor in the failings of English footballers.

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I doubt reserving one space in the starting 11 for English players would fall foul of any EU employment laws. The homegrown quota rule is probably more restrictive there and there have been no issues raised with that.

I am sure if all clubs agree to it then it won't be an issue either.

I mean, football is buying and selling players, no one is handing in 2 weeks notice either. It's not quite the same

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A very interseting article has popped upo on F365: http://www.football365.com/news/are-england-too-thick-to-win-anything

Tl;Dr - English footballers are to thick to win anything, and the lack of basic inelligence hinders English footballers.

The source of the article is anecdotal, maybe some merit in the overall point however and is something that plays a significant factor in the failings of English footballers.

I have been saying something similar for years

We need to produce more intelligent people to make better players.

Kids getting plucked at 13 or 14 and think they're heading to the big time. You get the feeling you can speak to even the most average of European players about football, they will have opinions, they can articulate what is happening on the pitch but honestly don't think you get much conversation from the English players, just soundbites and no actual thought out opinions.

Even when they get a sit down interview with a paper like the Guardian you come away thinking 'he's ok' but rarely that they're particularly intelligent

Of course, sweeping statement here but heard enough of our players speaking down the years

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Poor grass roots football, poor professional players, all in great part due to a lack of good management since an early age. I have seen several youth training sessions in England (not going to name clubs here) and the difference in quality of training to what I know well (Portugal and Spain) is just huge. This is even more serious because in reality you have everything to be producing great players on a regular basis: great facilities, crazy passion for the game in the country, and a big population.

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I have seen some professional, even premier club, clubs training and it was pretty much the same type of deal as amateur football training we can all play

We definitely need to address the level of coaching in England and how many we have. The money we have in the game ... let's put it to use!

What happened with St George's Park? Wasn't that supposed to do this? It's just a commercial enterprise, is my understanding, not run by the FA, so again, what's the point. FA in the middle again with no influence

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I have seen some professional, even premier club, clubs training and it was pretty much the same type of deal as amateur football training we can all play

We definitely need to address the level of coaching in England and how many we have. The money we have in the game ... let's put it to use!

What happened with St George's Park? Wasn't that supposed to do this? It's just a commercial enterprise, is my understanding, not run by the FA, so again, what's the point. FA in the middle again with no influence

Those facilities are fantastic, even Benfica are going to use them very shortly for their pre-season. So its really the coaching part you are lacking, the way that you play since an early age and also the way you look at players (ie usually the bigger boys get more chances at an early age than the smaller ones)

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This tournament was a massive missed opportunity for England. There were no dominant teams in it, and England had beaten all the semi finalists (in friendlies, yes) in the last 8 months. Hodgson really ****ed it up by not sticking to what he knows best; organisation, two banks of four, simple methodical football. Would've suited the players England have better too. Dier and Drinkwater/Henderson holding, Sterling/Milner/Lallana/Townsend wide, Rooney/Vardy/Alli off Kane. Instead he seemed to be pressurised by the FA and the media into a possession based style he wasn't comfortable coaching.

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I think money is the biggest problem: Too much money given to players who are too young. It leads to a lack of aspiration and a blunting of motivation.

If someone did a salary comparison of every National team in the world, at all levels, I bet England in all guises is by far and away, man for man, the best paid.

You can't restrict a person's ability to earn, therefore we can't fix this issue. And it is an issue, at a very basic humanistic level. Focus needs to be had on areas we can fix: education, training and coaching.

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I think money is the biggest problem: Too much money given to players who are too young. It leads to a lack of aspiration and a blunting of motivation.

If someone did a salary comparison of every National team in the world, at all levels, I bet England in all guises is by far and away, man for man, the best paid.

You can't restrict a person's ability to earn, therefore we can't fix this issue. And it is an issue, at a very basic humanistic level. Focus needs to be had on areas we can fix: education, training and coaching.

I wonder what the average wage a 21 year old English player earns is compared to their German, Spanish and Italian counterparts.

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The lack of proper, qualified coaches is very disappointing. We a tiny amount of UEFA licenced coaches in England compared to Spain and Germany. It's basic grassroots problems with mentality and tactical awareness.

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I wonder what the average wage a 21 year old English player earns is compared to their German, Spanish and Italian counterparts.

There's youngsters in the Chelsea ranks that have already earned millions of pounds in their careers without hardly kicking a ball for them. Where's the incentive to push themselves to regular starting spots when they're earning that sort of money? Players like Chaloboah and Baker might look good in youth tournaments but I feel they'll ultimately waste their careers and therefore deprive the England manager or more talent to pick from.

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I think money is the biggest problem: Too much money given to players who are too young. It leads to a lack of aspiration and a blunting of motivation.

If someone did a salary comparison of every National team in the world, at all levels, I bet England in all guises is by far and away, man for man, the best paid.

You can't restrict a person's ability to earn, therefore we can't fix this issue. And it is an issue, at a very basic humanistic level. Focus needs to be had on areas we can fix: education, training and coaching.

Too much money going to players, not enough going to coaches and too expensive to take the badges.

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There are clear problems with the English game.

1- Lack of player creativity and team play. Physically phenomenal. Technically phenomenal. Individually great. Then always do one of the same 2 or 3 predictable actions.

2- Managerial ineptitude. Teams play without a plan, both attacking and defending. Can't press properly. Rely on (or try to) individual duels throughout the game to win the upper hand. Basically play like an amateur side, just much faster and accurately.

3- For some reason this happens over and over again and I don't see it changing. This is not only about the NT, same applies to clubs (especially to the lower half of the EPL and down). There seems to be a resistance to change. You bring in successful foreign managers and they find themselves having to adapt and embrace the problems, or getting fired, or the players rebelling (see AVB), or fans rebelling (see LVG). Everyone seems to enjoy playing without tactics and plans, from fans to players. I can imagine a manager thinking to himself: "I'll put the formation on the drawboard, choose the best players, let them run up and down the pitch and see who wins."

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2- Managerial ineptitude. Teams play without a plan, both attacking and defending. Can't press properly. Rely on (or try to) individual duels throughout the game to win the upper hand. Basically play like an amateur side, just much faster and accurately.

For me this is the key issue with English/British football, it was clear that Leicester started each match with a clear tactical plan & worked hard on it in training with the end result being that they made much more talented squads look ordinary, it's the same story in European cup matches.

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I doubt reserving one space in the starting 11 for English players would fall foul of any EU employment laws. The homegrown quota rule is probably more restrictive there and there have been no issues raised with that.

Under EU laws it's a big no-no to differentiate based on nationality (for EU citizens that is, you can block non-EU citizens). That's actually the reason that the "home-grown" regulations came into place to begin with as that was a way to get some of the desired effects but still be legal. It's also why, when limits where in place, Spain, Sweden, Denmark and a few others had regulations limiting the numbers of non-EU players but non for EU players.

Not the case, as it doesn't actually prevent you from employing anyone. The top level of Ice hockey in the UK for example has a maximum limit of 14 non-British players in the match squad. 3 of which have to be EU passport holders, or you can just go with 11 non-EU passport holders. You can still employ as many/few as you want, the rule only applies to how many can be present in the match day squad. It would be the same principal if football here was to implement such rule. (EU referendum fallout notwithstanding)

That's a difference in name only though and the EU court decided, way back in the Bosman trial, that a limit on matchday or on-pitch squad players were a de-facto restraint on employment and thus they weren't legal. Icehockey might get away with it because no one has tested/complained about it but for football it has been clear for years that it isn't allowed.

I am sure if all clubs agree to it then it won't be an issue either.

I mean, football is buying and selling players, no one is handing in 2 weeks notice either. It's not quite the same

It would be a major issue as any player that feels he got pushed out/overlooked because of such a rule could take the club to court and sue for compensation. There is no way that any club would open itself up to that by agreeing to such a rule.

And no you can't just hand in your notice because the courts do recognize that football (sports in general) is a bit of a special case but even so they don't allow everything. The Bosman case was a start and football has then changed a more of the regulations so the courts wouldn't need to do it for them. The "buy out your own contract" thingy is one such change that was done in concert with the EU, even though it's still a bit iffy and unclear and rarely used.

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