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Work Permits and the Barclays Premier League


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I have just been promoted to the BPL after several seasons of torture in the Champs. In that time however I was anything but idle in the transfer market and purchased 11 youth players for my future first team. All these guys have been extremely well scouted and are likely to turn into great players. However, all of them require permits. Now I realise the permits business is realistic, but it isn't much fun. I have two feeders at present. One in Belgium and one in Spain. The players from South America are being fed to Spain and everyone else is going to Belgium. But Belgium is now 5 years. This means that my 18 year olds will be at least 22 or so by the time they have a permit. In FM terms that is more or less at the end of their career if they haven't had a lot of first team action. I've also got the issue where a few of them are becoming impatient. One Columbian now wants first team play, even though he hasn't got a permit. So I've had to offer him a rotational contract, or he wouldn't renew.

Is there any preferential feeder club for the speediest resolution? 5 years is insane if you think about it. Spain is great at 2 years for South American's. But I'm really struggling with this. In previous Fm's I've specialised in buying world class youth and developing them. It's the most fun thing you can do. But it's proving quite tedious in the BPL.

Any advice would be appreciated.

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More than likely if they are getting regular football and developing, you will get them a permit way before that by retrying for one... especially if they are a nation where they get a good chance of getting international games..

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Sometimes it can be advisable to not focus on the work-permit-feeder aspect and just get the loaned out to clubs in active leagues where they will play first team football and develop.

If this goes well then they will become better players and have a better chance of passing the work permit tests either through gaining caps or being of special quality. If not then they will still develop, appreciate in value, and can be sold.

The fact there is no longer quick countries really means you need to look at alternatives.

My suggestion above is just my findings and not intended to be a statement of unequivocal fact

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Well this is the thing. They've all had international games now, some have had several. But only one has had a permit granted. He was an Egyptian 18 year old and I got his permit before he was even loaned out to the feeder, which was a bit bizarre. The others are just idling away. I say that, they are playing for their clubs, one has done extremely well in fact, but it's painful to watch them and not be able to use them.

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'Several' doesn't sound like 75% in last two years though.

I agree its painful but it is part of (I think) UK law. The game also interprets e.g. Danish work permits properly, where you have to pay them a sizeable salary to get them in. (or at least this was once the case)

I don't know if this is the case any more, but I think I read somewhere that it's 75% of the matches they are eligible for.

Obviously if you're injured, that shouldn't affect the process.

Pretty sure there's also exceptional talent exceptions.

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He did say the players are meant to be exceptional talents though, so I'm wondering why (if they are) they didn't get approved a WP under those circumstances.

He did yeah, so there could well be something wrong.

Or it could be he has risen with an unfancied team, performing far better than the players on the pitch should actually should be capable of, and therefore players his scouts say are good for his team aren't actually good enough for the applicable threshold. Who knows

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It's weird, I anticipated having work permit issues for very young South American players, but it's been no problems so far. I'm in 3rd year in BPL and have signed I think 4 Brazilians under 17 with not even youth caps and a couple Argentinians under 17 also with no caps of any kind. All 6 players have been granted a work permit after the first appeal. Am I just getting lucky or what?

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Getting work permits for excellent youngsters is still and has been in earlier versions fairly easy. The struggles begin when they hit 22-23 (I can't remember the actual age) and they don't qualify for exceptional talents any more and you have to deal with normal rules.

I always watch the scouting report says about getting a work permit, but in general if I'm playing in the English leagues I try to avoid having to even bother trying to get work permits. There is more then enough talent in the EU that I rarely bother signing anyone outside of EU nationals.

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Well the plot thickens... I bought and Argentinian winger whom has been exceptional for me over the last two seasons. He asks for a new contract which I humbly accept and he is refused a work permit!

I've got a Spanish feeder - all my new South American imports will now go to this club for two years, which is excellent. But I'm totally stuffed with my Belgian feeder. I put 8 of them in this club which is lower tier until their permits were granted, hoping that they would qualify part way through. So far none of them have, and I'm over half way through with all of them. Some of them are now 22 years old :( lol.. You live and learn.

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