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borboski

Target Man - without jumping or heading

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Right - so in the Skrillz Premier I have a... fairly average side. One good striker, Kaine Shepherd, who has banged in 20+ goals for two seasons in a row. A basic and rigid 4-4-2 hasn't really got me anywhere, and so I've looked what the rest of the league are using and moved to:

FC

AML AMC AMR

MC MC

DL DC DC DR

I think this offers some tactical variation that makes sense. With the 4-4-2 I didn't know what to do to change it up. I could tell them to be "attacking" but it never resulted in making chances, if anything I'd just concede straight away. This one lets me:

- If I want to be very attacking I can show the AMC up to make to strikers, this guy is my jumping and heading monster, so we can go attacking, route one, cross early, etc.

- When I'm away the two MCs and drop back and both play in the DMC slot, the two AMLRs can come back as well to be MLRs, and I have some players who can do a "defensive winger" job.

So, generally I'm keeping it quite simply; both the MCs are "ball winning midfielders" and the back 4 are all "limited". The back 4 get very high average ratings, so I'm happy with that. I don't understand rigid/fluid, so I'm keeping that normal, or more rigid, with the aim that players keep their shape. I'm happy to go direct, the idea is that:

- We have 5 players in and around the midfield, lots of whom can head and tackle.

- We quickly move the ball out to the wide man.

So, ideally my FC would be a big guy who could link the play up, but Kaine Shephard is a nippier finisher. What sort of instructions should I give him? Do you think target man could work, or is there something else? I basically want to encourage players to feed him; I don't want him dropping back, I want him "on the shoulder" of the centre backs ready to make runs.

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A TM wouldn't work in his case if you use direct passes, that would result in high passes. If he has some strength you could use a DLF, you could use a TQ if he has creativity, technique, flair, CF-s if he is decent at a lot. To keep it simple a dlf-s would probably be yourbest bet if he has some strength.

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Thanks.

Which reminds - a simple question - what does the "deep" in DLF mean? Does it mean he's deep towards the opposition's goal, into their territory, or is he deep within my own formation, e.g. operating more like a centre forward? I'm assuming it means he's playing in a more attacking position?

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Deep = towards your goal, High = towards their goal.

So a DLF-s will drop between the regular striker position (in between the DC's) and the AMC position. Still by the way, if you use direct passing, some high balls will be passed to him, but not as frequent as with a TM-s if I am correct.

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... I don't understand rigid/fluid, so I'm keeping that normal, or more rigid, with the aim that players keep their shape...

For a better understanding of Fluitity take a look here:

How-to-Play-FM14-A-Twelve-Step-Guide

"Step" 1 should be very helpfull, at least it helped me alot to get the idea.

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