Harper

The 'How Do I Pronounce That?' Thread sponsored by David Pleat

959 posts in this topic

[quote name='noxion']Romanian midfielder Mihai Onicaș?[/QUOTE]

IPA: /mihaj onikaʃ/. Pronounced roughly as mee-hy aw-nee-kah-sh. The accent falls on the 'a' in both words/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i have a difficult one to say ive never even bothered saying it

Danijel Cmeljesevic hes serbian by the way

is it Dan-yell Smell-ja-sev-itch?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Sampa']Balazs Dzsudzsak

I don't actually know but after from hearing it (before they found their pronunciation) I pronounced it as:
Ba-laz Dzud-zshak
I can't explain the latter part of the name with letters but I pronounce it like "shack" but more z like. Kinda like a Spanish J on Jack sound. Lol.

dnt really have 1 for anyone else...[/QUOTE]

my bad, nevermind

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Txurruka, my Spanish regen. How's the 'Tx' pronounced?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Mikal']David Txurruka, my Spanish regen. How's the 'Tx' pronounced?[/QUOTE]

That looks like a Basque surname. No idea how to pronounce Basque, it's a language apart...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Mikal']David Txurruka, my Spanish regen. How's the 'Tx' pronounced?[/QUOTE]

I guess the "x" would be silent?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Mikal']David Txurruka, my Spanish regen. How's the 'Tx' pronounced?[/QUOTE]

Chu-ru-kah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Was thinking of re-making this thread but thought I would just get this one up and running again

So the first name on FM11 I need help with is a Frenchman Benoît Boulanger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boulanger : boo-lan-jay
with "an" like the "an" in dance, by the way boulanger means baker. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, that my name!! thanks mate! just signed him for Worcester in BSN, apparently he can play at a leading League 1 level :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Inoncencio (Brazil)

In-non Sense See Oh

That's what I've been saying. In Brazil they call Mancini. Man-see-knee, right? As opposed to a proper Italian pronounciation of Man-Chi-Knee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Sheva Elite']Inoncencio (Brazil)

In-non Sense See Oh

That's what I've been saying. In Brazil they call Mancini. Man-see-knee, right? As opposed to a proper Italian pronounciation of Man-Chi-Knee.[/QUOTE]

Personally I would say "Inn-onn Thenf-fio" But see what you mean about different dialects

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='DanielZvern']I have this doubts

Cvitanic

[/QUOTE]

Ts - Wee - Tahn - Ich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='MarkTCfc']Personally I would say "Inn-onn Thenf-fio" But see what you mean about different dialects[/QUOTE]
He stands correct about Inoncencio. You should probably ask PMLF for a confirmation though. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
got a Danish bloke called Kenneth Zohore?

is it like Za-whore?
or Zo-horr-ey? (horr like horror)

got an italian called Enrico Sgherri (Enrico i'm fine with) Sgherri however is the problem (Sug-herr-ee?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
S'gerri the gerri part should rhyme with very.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If playing in Brazil you can pronounce english names like this:

[video=youtube;9EgBILVTpPM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EgBILVTpPM[/video]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='VonBlade']Well if my support of Speedway has taught me anything it's how to pronounce the Poles.

Balash ju-jak.[/QUOTE]

Approximately, except he's not a pole, but Hungarian.

Balázs Dzsudzsák does not equal Balazs Dzsudzsak, notice the little commas on the a's, the first a does not have one and it's pronounced more like the o in h[b]ot[/b]. The other a's are clear like in f[b]a[/b]ther.
Also the zs is pronounced like the ge in rou[b]ge[/b]
[ˈbɒlaːʒ ˈd͡ʒud͡ʒaːk]
so the end result is something like
Bolage Jujak

Not important, but also of note, Hungarian names follow the eastern name order, so this guy in Hungary is called Dzsudzsák Balázs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danny Shetela, Shavi Ernandet.

Not sure about the th though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's definitely [I]Dzu-dzak Bolage[/I] (it's not really the english [I]j[/I]).

If in doubt guys I highly recommend [URL="http://www.forvo.com/search/Bal%C3%A1zs%20Dzsudzs%C3%A1k/"]Forvo[/URL] as a point of call. If in doubt after that then here is the place to try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='BathPalace'] [URL="http://www.forvo.com/search/Bal%C3%A1zs%20Dzsudzs%C3%A1k/"]Forvo[/URL][/QUOTE]

You just killed the thread. Good job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='samdiatmh']got a Danish bloke called Kenneth Zohore?

is it like Za-whore?
or Zo-horr-ey? (horr like horror)

got an italian called Enrico Sgherri (Enrico i'm fine with) Sgherri however is the problem (Sug-herr-ee?)[/QUOTE]

Although it isn't a Danish surname the way it is pronounced in the Danish press is "Zo-whore" with some emphasis on the "e" almost making it "Zo-whoré"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='paulpaps']My mate calls Shevchenko, "Shevanenko". He's just strange though. He just can't seem to say Shevchenko.[/QUOTE]

I heard David Pleat call him 'Shevalenko' once. Genius.

And although off-topic, this is worth mentioning; I once worked with a guy who managed to pronounce Quentin Tarantino as 'Quarantine Tornado'. He was denser than a neutron star, though, bless him. I laughed so hard I nearly pulled a muscle!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a few I've always wanted to know in my squad:

Carlos Monje (Spanish)
Deniz Kalayci (German)
Alfredo Huarte (Spanish)
Imanol Goikoetxea (Spanish)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='CaptainPlanet']I have a few I've always wanted to know in my squad:

Carlos Monje (Spanish)
Deniz Kalayci (German)
Alfredo Huarte (Spanish)
Imanol Goikoetxea (Spanish)[/QUOTE]

Carlos Mon-yay or maybe Mon-yuh
Den-its Ka-lay-chee or Ka-ly-chee
Alfredo Hw-art-uh Or Hw-art-ay
Imanol Goy-kuh-chay-uh

All just wild stabs in the dark. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='DanielZvern']Hoebke/Höbke[/QUOTE]
With sounds of the English language, I think this is a quite accurate pronounciation: IPA [hɜpkɘ]
ɜ like the i in 'third' but shorter.
ɘ like the e in 'the'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='CaptainPlanet']
Carlos Monje (Spanish)[/quote]

Carlos MON-cheh [like Scottish "ch" in [i]loch[/i], not like standard "ch"]

[quote]Deniz Kalayci (German)[/quote]

In standard German should be Deniz Ka-LIE-tzee... Then again depending on the ethnicity it might change, but Germans do transliterate names and surnames to accomodate the actual pronounciation to German ortography...

[quote]Alfredo Huarte (Spanish)[/quote]

Al-FREH-doh Hwu-AHR-teh ("te" like in [i]tent[/i] but longer

[quote]Imanol Goikoetxea (Spanish)[/QUOTE]

Ee-ma-NOL Goy-koh-eh-CHE-ah ["che" like in [i]chess[/i]]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danny Szetela:

Danny Sche-te-la (pronounce e's as in the word 'error'). It's a Polish last name I think, although not very common.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='OG.L']Manuel Campisi

Ted Bosch

Dauoda coulibaly

Ronald De Leeuw[/QUOTE]

I think Manuel is pronaounced Mánwell with the "w" being more of a slight "oo" sound. Campisi would be something like Come-pee-see, but i'm noit sure about the stresses.

Ted Bosch is pronounced the same as Ted (like in Teddy Roosevelt) Bos (as in Who's The Boss), the "ch" has no sound in this case. Just an old dutch word that meant forest. The word for forest nowadays is just bos, without the ch. Its only used in surnames and some town names, like " 's Herthogenbosch "(nowadays primarily known as Den Bosch, like in FC Den Bosch (say: èf cay (see below for correct sound) Dan ("an" like "then") Boss).

Daouda Coulibaly would be Da-ooh-da Coo-lee-ba-lee I think, probably a Malian name.

Ronald de Leeuw is Ronald, like in english, but with an "a" as in "are" and an "o" as in "boat". So Roanàld, and not the english Ronneld. De with the "e" like in "the" and Leeuw is something like Lay, but without the j-sound and finished like a cat's meaow, so Layw. Hard to explain. We dutch would write the english word Lay phonetically as Leej, so loose the j-sound and you have it, just add the ow part of "meaow". Means Ronald the Lion in dutch. The "d" is not a capital by the way, thats a silly rule: only when teh first name is in front of it it is a small d, without the first name, it's a capital D. So "Ronald de Leeuw scores!", and "And De Leeuw scores".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deniz Kalaycı (not "i", "ı" for it is Turkish) is obviously of Turkish origin and is pronounced as:

Dah-neez Kuh-lie-jı ("ı" as you would pronounce the "a" while you *quickly* would say "I was")

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Makollig Jezvahted']So Kuijte is pronounced as Dirk [B]Kuyt[/B] and adding an "uh"[/QUOTE]

True, but the "uy" (or "ui" in normal dutch words) is very hard to phonetically explain in english. English tend to make Cruijff sound like Croyf and Dirk Kuyt like Durk Koyt. But the ui (or uij/uy)-sound is a sound not known to the english language. I've tried to find an english word that resembles it, but I havent been able to find one. The same goes for the "ij" or "ei" sound, very common in dutch, but almost unpronouncable for foreigners. Try to explain to an englishman how to pronounce the city where football club Telstar resides, which is IJmuiden. And yes, with two capitals, IJ is seen as one letter and as such in names and at the start of a sentence are capital I and capital J, something that is often wrong in FM. So it's Jan IJzerman, and not Jan Ijzerman (that looks rediculous to a dutchman).

The i in Dirk is like the i in "it" by the way. And the r is a bit harder, more from the back of the throat.
And it's not Burgkamp, but Bergkamp (e like in "bear" and a as in "arm", g very raw, like a rasp in your throat).

Other typical dutch lettercombi's are "ou" or "au" (which are pronounced as in "now"), "oe" (pronounced as in "you) and "eu" (like "her"). So Jeroen Bouma is Ye (like the) roun (like you) Bow (like now) mah (like obama).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='chelsea_____Rules']Matej Delac?

Is it Matej Delac?
Or Matej Deyak?[/QUOTE]

Matej Delač

Math - eigh (as number 8 without the t)
Del - ach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
so i've got these French regens:
Amestoy, Raynaud

Portuguese:
Figueiredo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='kpain16']Matej Delač

Math - eigh (as number 8 without the t)
Del - ach[/QUOTE]
kpain, don't you mean Del - atch? That's what I always thought the č sound was supposed to be like. It's not a soft ch as in 'loch', is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ilian Micanski/Mitsanski - 1.FC Kaiserslautern
Ciprian Deac - FC Schalke
Klaas-Jan Huntelaar (is it Hüntelaar or Huntelaar?) - FC Schalke
Grafite - VfL Wolfsburg (The German reporters use all varieties... Grafité, Grafitch, Grafit, Grafitɘ...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='Koki']Klaas-Jan Huntelaar (is it Hüntelaar or Huntelaar?) - FC Schalke[/QUOTE]
It's Huntelaar, no umlaut.

Klaas - long a, sounding like 'aah'
Jan - j sounding like the y in 'young'; short a sounding the the a in 'are'
Huntelaar - Hunt the same as in English, e sounding like 'eh', double a the same as in Klaas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='robbert_o154']It's Huntelaar, no umlaut.

Klaas - long a, sounding like 'aah'
Jan - j sounding like the y in 'young'; short a sounding the the a in 'are'
Huntelaar - Hunt the same as in English, e sounding like 'eh', double a the same as in Klaas[/QUOTE]
Thanks for the explanation of a native speaker. Wonder where the German reporters got the Hüntelaar from.
So IPA would be: [hʌntəla:r]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It amazes me that Dutch is such a hard language for non-Dutch to work out the pronunciation of stuff. I always presumed it was similar in terms of word sounds to German, but being an ignorant Englishman I guess I was pretty wrong :p

Anyways, I've got one that's confusing me:

Luis Solignac

Looking at his name I'd have thought it would have a similar pronunciation to cognac (the drink), but he's Argentine with no second nationality and no history at all in France as far as I can tell, so that doesn't make sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[quote name='robbert_o154']kpain, don't you mean Del - atch? That's what I always thought the č sound was supposed to be like. It's not a soft ch as in 'loch', is it?[/QUOTE]

Yeah you're right, it's "atch". Sorry :S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.