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  1. Football Manager 2015 - Editing the League Table The coding for editing the league table has changed in Football Manager 2015, on the plus side it seems we can now actually customize (through the xml files) what items display on what views, however we have lost some control over the width of the columns. The panel is now controlled by two xml files obtained from the panels.fmf file: league stage.xml - now just controls the general settings of the table, mainly what graphics are assigned to the various rows and the height of the rows. (there is also 'league stage auto sized vertical.xml' which is the same but has shorter row heights so this file might be used on certain screens). league stage panel views.xml - this file now controls what appears on the league table and how the items are arranaged, the way it is coded is similar to how the columns on the squad screen are coded, so editing the file is similar to how you used to have to edit the squad screen to get custom views before they were changable in game. So for each view there will be code like this: <!-- Overall stats --> <record id="over"> <translation id="text" translation_id="359652" type="use" value="Overall[COMMENT: league_table; use top 10 matches; category for stats relating to performance at home or away]" /> <record id="view"> <!-- Main league position --> <flags id="Lpos" /> <!-- Cup qualification info --> <flags id="Lqin" /> <!-- Team name --> <flags id="Ttea" /> <!-- Team's nation. Will be hidden if not an international club comp --> <flags id="Dnat" /> <!-- Overall played --> <flags id="LOpl" /> <!-- Overall won --> <flags id="LOwo" /> <!-- Overall drawn --> <flags id="LOdr" /> <!-- Overall lost --> <flags id="LOlo" /> <!-- Overall for --> <flags id="LOfo" /> <!-- Overall against --> <flags id="LOag" /> <!-- Overall goal difference --> <flags id="LOgd" /> <!-- Overall points --> <flags id="LOpo" /> </record> </record> The file is commented so it should be easy to work out what id corresponds to what, each of the flags lines above corresponds to a column on the league table, the above example is for the Overall view and the line <flags id="Ttea" /> is for the team name. If you wish to change the order of the columns you just need to change the order of the lines, the top line is the first item to display on the left in game, so for the Overall view League Position is first, followed by Qualification status and then Team Name. So if you wish for the Qualification place column to appear last you change the above code to read: <!-- Overall stats --> <record id="over"> <translation id="text" translation_id="359652" type="use" value="Overall[COMMENT: league_table; use top 10 matches; category for stats relating to performance at home or away]" /> <record id="view"> <!-- Main league position --> <flags id="Lpos" /> <!-- Team name --> <flags id="Ttea" /> <!-- Team's nation. Will be hidden if not an international club comp --> <flags id="Dnat" /> <!-- Overall played --> <flags id="LOpl" /> <!-- Overall won --> <flags id="LOwo" /> <!-- Overall drawn --> <flags id="LOdr" /> <!-- Overall lost --> <flags id="LOlo" /> <!-- Overall for --> <flags id="LOfo" /> <!-- Overall against --> <flags id="LOag" /> <!-- Overall goal difference --> <flags id="LOgd" /> <!-- Overall points --> <flags id="LOpo" /> <!-- Cup qualification info --> <flags id="Lqin" /> </record> </record> If you wish to hide a column for a view then just delete (or comment out) the flags line for the item you don't want displayed, so if you don't want the goal difference displaying on the Overall Table remove these lines: <!-- Overall goal difference --> <flags id="LOgd" /> You can also add columns from other table views so if you want to display the average points value you just need to locate the code where it is used elsewhere in the file and paste it into the position you want it to appear. For example the below code will display the Average Points last: <!-- Overall stats --> <record id="over"> <translation id="text" translation_id="359652" type="use" value="Overall[COMMENT: league_table; use top 10 matches; category for stats relating to performance at home or away]" /> <record id="view"> <!-- Main league position --> <flags id="Lpos" /> <!-- Cup qualification info --> <flags id="Lqin" /> <!-- Team name --> <flags id="Ttea" /> <!-- Team's nation. Will be hidden if not an international club comp --> <flags id="Dnat" /> <!-- Overall played --> <flags id="LOpl" /> <!-- Overall won --> <flags id="LOwo" /> <!-- Overall drawn --> <flags id="LOdr" /> <!-- Overall lost --> <flags id="LOlo" /> <!-- Overall for --> <flags id="LOfo" /> <!-- Overall against --> <flags id="LOag" /> <!-- Overall goal difference --> <flags id="LOgd" /> <!-- Overall points --> <flags id="LOpo" /> <!-- Away average points --> <flags id="LAap" /> </record> </record> You can also resize the columns to do this you first need to change the line of code from flags to record and then add a width="X" bit where X is the width of the column, so if you wanted to resize the Qualification Status column to take up 200 pixels you'd change this line: <!-- Cup qualification info --> <flags id="Lqin" /> To read: <!-- Cup qualification info --> <record id="Lqin" width="200"/> You can also change the alignment by adding the following alignment="left/centre/right" so if you wanted the Qualification Status content to be right aligned you'd change the code to read: <!-- Cup qualification info --> <record id="Lqin" alignment="right"/> Note again that you need to have changed the flag code to record to get the changes to be read by the game. You can also combine codes, so if you wanted the Qualification column 200 pixels wide and right aligned you'd change the code to read: <!-- Cup qualification info --> <record id="Lqin" width="200" alignment="right"/> There are various other codes you can use as well (it looks like any of the styling codes used elsewhere will work) these are just a couple (replacing X with the value you want): spec="X" - assign content to take on text, title font styling. colour="X" - changes the colour of the content. style="X" - changes font style, bold etc... Also in the width values you can use -1, -2, -3 etc... values to dynamicaly adjust the width of the columns depending on resolution rather than having them at fixed widths (team name column looks like it's still defaulted to -1 which means it used up what space is left after the other columns have been called). Unfortantley at the moment I haven't found the code that will also adjust the headings, so if you change the width or alignment values you might find that the header for the column isn't lined up with the content. Also the file itself doesn't seem to contain any details as to what the default width of the columns are so adjusting the widths is a bit hit and miss.
  2. Football Manager 2015 Skinning Guide Part 3: Changing the Text Colours Welcome to the third part of my updated Skinning Guide for FM2015. Before reading this guide make sure you have read the previous parts of the guide as well as the extracting files guide, as this guide will assume you have followed those guides. The previous parts of the guide talked you through creating a new skin and then changing the fonts and some of the font settings, this part of the guide will explain how to change the colours of most of the text in the game. Before starting I advise you have the following folder locations open: Your 'Working' Folder Location from the previous guide (which is where you extracted the default game files to) The my_first_skin folder within your Saving Location. Some housekeeping Before we start we need to do some housekeeping. First browse to the my_first_skin folder within your Saving Location and open the settings folder then open the 'my_first_skin settings.xml' and delete the contents of the file as the font settings located in that file aren't used with FM2015 and are just leftover from previous versions. Once that is done you want to paste the following code into the file: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <properties version="1.0"> </properties> So the file should look like this: Locating the default colours Before you start changing the colours you first need to locate where the default text colours are stored, these are located in the xml files located within the various settings folders. The first location you need to check are the folders for the parent skin to your skin, if you cannot remember which parent skin you set then open the skin_config.xml file located within the my_first_skin folder and locate the parent line that looks like this: <flags id="parent" value="fm dark-widgets" /> In this case the parent skin we need to look in is 'fm dark-widgets' So in your Working folder now browse to the skins\fm dark-widgets\settings folder. In that folder will be an xml file called 'fm dark-widgets settings' this file contains the colour settings that are unique to this skin. If your skin has a different parent skin the settings file may be blank or not exist, if that is the case you will then have to look in the files for that skins parent skin. However the colour settings are also stored elsewhere, if you go back to your Working Folder you will see a settings folder. This folder contains two more xml files that we are interested in 'colours' and 'fm colours'. So we now have three files that control the skin colours and you will notice that some of the lines located in the 'colours' and 'fm colours' files are also present in the 'fm dark-widgets settings' file but with different values. This is because the game works on a file hierarchy. The game will first look in in the 'fm dark-widgets settings' file for the colour name if it finds the value it will use the value from that file, if it doesn't find the value only then will it look in the 'colours' and 'fm colours' files. So when copying values over to edit always look in the settings file first and only move onto the colour files if you cannot find the colour name you are looking for. If you want a shortcut then you can download one of the base skins and look inside the settings file for the base skin where I have already copied all the default colours for each skin into one file to save you having to locate them yourself. Changing the text colours Now that you have located the default values, to change the colours you just need to locate the relevant colour name and copy it into the settings file for your skin. But before we get to that there is one other thing you need to consider. Football Manager 2015 made changes to how the skin graphics are coloured, instead of taking the colour of the graphic like in the past the skin graphic colours are now also set by these same three files, which means you have to be a bit careful when copying and changing the colours as some of the colour names will apply to skin graphics not the text and unfortunately the coding for both is exactly the same, though I'll cover the full details of how to edit the graphic colours in a later guide for now you just need to be aware that the code in these files doesn't just control the text colours. The settings for the skin graphics are set at the top of the 'fm dark-widget settings' file, whilst the text settings start after this line of code (line #172): <!-- misc "special" colours --> As a simple example I am going to show you how to change the player attribute colours, the player attributes are controlled by these lines from the 'fm dark-widgets settings' file: <!-- profile attribute colours --> <colour name="low attribute" red="250" green="250" blue="250" alpha="140"/> <colour name="normal attribute" red="250" green="250" blue="250" alpha="200"/> <colour name="good attribute" red="159" green="220" blue="122" /> <colour name="excellent attribute" red="122" green="199" blue="75" /> Now locate those lines yourself and paste them into the 'my_first_skin settings' file. Now when pasting the code into the file you need to ensure the code is pasted between the two properties bits of code like below: If you paste the code into the wrong place the game won't read the code and may flash up an error message when you reload the skin, if it does then just click ok on the message, fix the xml file, save the changes and then reload the skin. Now that we have copied the relevant bits of code over we need to recolour the code, this is done in exactly the same way as shown in the previous guide, however instead of each colour getting its own line of code all three colours are on the same line. To adjust the colour you need to change the values for each component. Valid values range from 0 to 255, where 255,255,255 is white, 0,0,0 is black, 255,0,0 is red, 0,255,0 is green etc… The alpha value affects how transparent the colour is, 255 gives you a solid colour, where 0 makes the text completely transparent. To change the text colour you need to know the RGB value of the colour you want, the easiest way to get this is from an image editing program. So load up paint.net, and in the Colors panel at the bottom left click the more button to expand the panel and it will now show the RGB value of the selected colour and as you change the colour on the colour wheel you'll see the RGB values change. Alternatively there is a colour picker included within the game – just go to Preferences -> Interface -> Skin Colours, then click on one of the existing colours and a colour selector pops up where you can select a colour and get its RGB value. As a simple exercise I am going to ask you to change the attribute colours to match the colours used for the player positions, so change the low attribute to match the poor position, the normal attribute to the awkward colour, good to unconvincing and excellent to competent (you should be able to locate the RGB values for the positions from the code located within the 'fm dark-widgets settings' file). If done correctly your player attributes should now look something like this: In the above screenshot you'll see that the text font and colour is still set from the previous guide, don't worry if you have undone those changes as they make no difference here. To change the colour of other bits of text you just do the same, you just need to locate the relevant colour name for the text you want recoloured, copy it over and adjust the values. The hardest thing is finding the correct colour name, whilst most are commented or named in a way that it makes it clear what they affect, some bits can be controlled by obscure values. If you cannot find the relevant colour name then have a look on the forum as someone else may have already asked the same thing, if not then just open a thread and ask and hopefully someone will have the answer. Also note that for some items you have to edit the xml for that panel to change the colour, however this will be covered in a later part of the guide. You can find downloadable versions (pdf and docx versions at the moment) of this guide at the bottom of this page on my website. --- Redistribution Terms You are free to post this content to your website provided: 1. It is not sold or behind a paywall. 2. You don't advertise it as being exclusive to your website. 3. My username and blog address are included: http://michaeltmurrayuk.blogspot.co.uk/
  3. Football Manager 2015 Skinning Guide Part 5: Editing the xml files Welcome to the fifth part of my updated Skinning Guide for FM2015. Before reading this guide make sure you have read the previous parts of the guide as well as the extracting files guide, as this guide will assume you have followed those guides. The previous parts of the guide talked you through creating a new skin, changing the fonts, changing some of the font settings and colours, with the last part detailing how to change the skin graphics. This part of the guide will talk you through some of the basics of how the xml files work. Due to how Football Manager works it isn't possible to give you a full guide on how to edit the xml files however this guide should give you some basic information to get you started. I also have some more detailed posts on this forum/my website that talk you through modifying certain screens and if you combine those guides with the basics learned here you should get a good understanding of how the xml coding in Football Manager works, after that the best way to learn is just from the experience of looking through and editing the xml files. Editing the xml files is fairly simple once you know where to start and as such it doesn't actually require any coding experience, though some very very basic knowledge of coding or even webpage editing will give you a quicker start (even the simple knowledge of how to manually format your posts when posting on the forum is all you really need to start with). You should also only rarely need to actually write your own xml code, most if not all of your xml editing will involve copying code from one place/file to another to change where it displays or will involve deleting of some code if you want to hide certain things, so you mainly need to know how the code links together and what is part of the same code. The hardest thing you'll probably have to do is to adjust the code you copied so it matches the format of the existing code as the code can change slightly depending on where and how it's displayed. Before starting I advise you have the following folder locations open: - Your 'Working' Folder Location from the previous guide (which is where you extracted the default game files to). - The my_first_skin folder within your Saving Location. You will also need to have your preferred xml file editor open as well as FM2015. The basics of the xml file Before you start editing the xml files you need to understand how the files work on a basic level. If you want some background information on xml coding in generally then check out the XML Tutorial offered by w3schools.com – though for FM purposes you only really need to know the first few chapters anything past the Attributes chapter isn't really needed for FM. The first thing you need to know is there are three kinds of tags you'll come across in the xml files; <record> </record> <record/> The first one <record>is an opening tag this starts off some code which is then closed by the second tag </record>which is a closing tag. For each <record>tag that you have you also need to have a </record>tag in the file as the opening and closing tags must always balance, if you don't balance the tags you'll get an error in game. In addition a closing tag will only close a tag of the same name so a closing tag </string>will not close or balance out a <record> tag to close the <record>tag you need a </record>tag. A </string>tag will only close a <string>tag. The third tag <record/> is a self-contained tag it opens and closes itself and as such doesn't need to be balanced. For a simple example open up the 'skins\my_first_skin\skin_config' xml file. On the second line you'll see a <record>tag this opens up a record element. In the middle of the file you'll notice several lines like these: <string id="name" value="My First Skin (Dark)" /> <string id="skin_name" value="my_first_skin" /> <string id="author" value="michaeltmurrayuk" /> <translation id="description" translation_id="249669" type="use" value="This is my first skin based on the Dark Default Skin" /> <string id="version" value="1.0" /> <flags id="parent" value="fm dark-widgets" /> All of these are self-contained tags, you'll notice that each of these have more than one word/element to them and in case of the translation one it might even be spread over more than one line yet they are all self-contained tags, that is because the tag type is only determined by the first word and by how the tag is opened and closed. In this example we have three different elements; four string elements, a translation element and a flag element, these are determined by being the first word after the < which opens the element, and we know they are self-contained tags because the elements are closed by /> Finally at the bottom of the file we have a </record> tag which closes the record element, and balances out the file as we have one <record> tag and one </record> tag which opens and then closes a record element, with the rest of the tags being self-contained tags that don't need balancing. The other thing you'll notice in this file are lines that contain <!-- and --> these are comment tags and work in the same way as the open and close tags, <!-- will open a comment and-->will close a comment, you'll notice that comments can either be contained to one line or span several lines. Comments aren't read by the game but are notes for the user that will either contain notes about what a bit of code does or will disable some code. You can also add your own comments as you go to remind you what a certain piece of code does or id pertains to once you have worked it out, which can be handy if you come back to the file in the future and forgot what you had done to it. The next thing you need to know about is nesting. With the xml code you can nest elements within other elements of the same or different types. Nesting affects how various bits appear in the game and is used to group items together or to apply properties to a certain item. What you need to know at the moment is that nesting is affected by where you place the close tags within the xml file, so when messing around with the tags you'll need to ensure you place them in the correct place. You can see a quick example of nesting by opening the 'my_first_skin\fonts\text' xml file that you should still have from a previous part of the guide, around the middle of the file you'll notice some code that looks like this: <!-- shadowed style --> <record style="shadowed"> <list id="shadows"> <record> <integer id="x_offset" value="0"/> <integer id="y_offset" value="1"/> <integer id="blur_radius" value="2"/> <integer id="colour_red" value="0"/> <integer id="colour_green" value="0"/> <integer id="colour_blue" value="0"/> <integer id="colour_alpha" value="75"/> </record> </list> </record> The first line is a comment which lets us know the following code affects how the shadow on this text appears, the next line opens up a record element, then we open a list element and then open another record element, we then have seven self-contained integer elements, we then have a tag that closes one of the record elements, with the element it closing being the second one (<record>), we then close the list element before finally closing the remaining record element. To simplify the above code opens up a record1 element, then a list element, then a record2 element (we can ignore the integer elements as they are all self-contained), it then closes the record2 element, then the list element before finally closing the record1 element. You'll also notice that the <record style="shadowed"> element is closed by just a </record> tag this is because closing tags should only ever contain the one first word that determines the element type. Element Types The next thing you need to know are what the most common element types are and what they do. Container The container element as its name suggests acts as a container, these are mainly used to group bits of code, and you can also use blank containers to add some padding between items. Widget The widget element is used to display pretty much any kind of graphic or text in the game. Layout The layout element as its name suggests is used to position your containers and widgets on the screen. You'll quickly come to find this element rather frustrating as there are multiple layout attributes that often have to be used to together but it's not always clear which ones need to be used on certain screens or in certain places. These are the three most common and basic elements used by Football Manager, however as you'll have seen from the previous examples there are also various other elements, however for the most part you won't need to adjust these unless you are doing something in particular (in which case the instructions will be covered in that particular guide) and if you do they act in the same way as these elements so once you have understand the basics of these three common elements you should be able to understand what the other elements do. Element Attributes Next up are the element attributes, if you refer to the following line in the 'my_first_skin\skin_config' xml file: <string id="author" value="michaeltmurrayuk" /> By now you should recognize that this is a self-contained tag because it starts with < and ends with /> and as the first word is 'string' this is a string element. The other items 'id' and 'value' are called attributes whilst the 'author' and 'michaeltmurrayuk' items are referred to as attribute values. Element attributes always have to be formatted in the following format; attribute="attribute_value" The first word sets the attribute, you then follow this with an = and then place the attribute value inside " marks, if you don't do this correctly the game won't read the attribute and it will flag up an error. The = sign is telling the game to assign the following value to this attribute, whilst the "marks are needed to tell the game where the attribute value starts and ends as some attributes can contain more than one attribute value; alignment="top, left" In this example we are setting the alignment of something and we are wanting it to be in the top left position, so when including more than one attribute value for an attribute you separate them by a coma (,). The space after the coma is optional as the game will read both values without the space, the space just makes it easier for you to read. You'll also notice quite often that you will have two related attributes following each other, in the first example the first attribute is telling the game we want to set the author variable and the value we are assigning it is my name (michaeltmurrayuk). In the second example the alignment attribute will normally be followed by an inset code so it looks like this; alignment="top, left" inset="10" In this case we want to place something to the top left corner and want it to appear 10 pixels in from the top and left sides. Attribute Types There are countless attribute types that you can declare in the game, these attributes are used to apply properties to the various elements. The attributes you can use are fixed as they are telling the game you want to set a certain attribute and as such the game needs to understand what attribute you are setting, whilst with attribute values you are generally free to put in what you want, though some attributes will only take certain values, but for the most part you can generally tell what values an attribute wants from its name. What I am going to do now is talk you through some of the common attribute types for the three main elements (container, widget and layout). First I want you to browse to the 'panels' folder inside your 'Working' folder and copy the 'player profile' xml file. We will use this file to get some examples from as it’s a relatively simple file and corresponds to a screen nearly everyone should know. Now open the 'my_first_skin' folder in your Saving Location and if you haven't already create a new folder called panels and paste the 'player profile' xml file into this folder, so the panels folder of your 'my_first_skin' should now look like this: Next load up Football Manager 2015 and set your skin to 'My First Skin (Dark)' and then browse to the Overview -> Attributes panel for any of your players. Now open the copied 'player profile' xml file. I will use this file to run through some of the various attribute types you'll come across. Container Attribute Types If you look on line #23 you should see this code: <container class="bordered_box" id="pdet" file="player profile personal details" /> The first attribute you will normally see is the class one this determines what kind of container we are wanting, and for containers the class determines the appearance of the container and you should remember from the graphics part of the guide that when we changed the attributes box graphic it didn't change the box around the profile, that is because as you can see this container is a bordered box whilst the attributes container was a subsection box. There are several different box types you can set the containers to (you can get a list of names from the subfolders listed in the skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\ folder from your 'Working' folder). To change the type you just change the bordered bit to a different box, so if you want it to look like the attribute container change the above line to the following; <container class="subsection_box" id="pdet" file="player profile personal details" /> Which should then look something like this in-game (if you haven't reverted the changes from the previous guides): The main difference between the default subsection and bordered boxes is the fact that the subsection box has a space for a panel title whilst the bordered box doesn't. If you want you can experiment with the different styles to see what they look like, the two other types you'll normally come across are titled and plain with both of these giving you transparent panels one with space for a title and one without. The next bit is the 'id'attribute which is used by the game to identify certain items, this can be a bit of a tricky one as some containers need a set id to display their contents correctly, others don't need one at all and in some cases the game needs each container to have its own unique id, for the most part you shouldn't need to adjust this, you only need to adjust this if you are using existing code as a template for something you have added. The last attribute on this line is the 'file'attribute, this as the name implies is used to grab data from another file, in this case it Is telling the game to populate the contents of this container with the code found in the 'player profile personal details'xml file. Now if you look on line #16 you will see the following different attributes for a container: <container class="vertical_adaptive_container" id="PLPR" inset="0" offset="0" gap="8"> In this case we are still setting the class of the container but instead of just assigning it to a box we are setting it to something called a 'vertical_adaptive_container'and what this does is tell the game to change how many of the nested containers will appear on screen determined by our screen resolution, in this example we want to change the amount of vertical containers with the height of our screen, so if you are playing at a vertical resolution of 768 pixels you'll notice that we have the three classic rows of containers (Personal Details, Selection Details and Statistics) however if you increase your vertical resolution enough you'll notice that a fourth row (Positions) appears. There is also a 'horizontal_adaptive_container'class that operates in the same way but on the horizontal axis (think the Player Overview -> Profile screen). The next attributes we are interested in on this line are the 'inset'and 'offset'attributes and these determine how close to the edge of the container the content and graphics will appear, in this case the inset value determines how many pixels from the left and right of the screen the nested containers content appears and the offset determines how many pixels from the top and bottom of the screen the content appears. If you play around with these values you'll notice that the position of the Attributes, Positions and Selection Details panels with respect to the edge of the screen changes, however you'll notice that the Statistics panel isn't affected, this is because it turns out the Statistics panel isn't nested within this vertical_adapative_container and as such isn't affected by any changes we make to this line of code. Note that the inset doesn't always just adjust the left/right margins and the offset doesn't always just adjust the vertical margins, how it acts depends on the element and preceding attributes, the quickest way to see what they actually do in other places is to adjust the values then reload your skin and see what direction the item has moved. You can also use negative numbers and these will shift the content the other way, in this case it will cause the content to start closer to the edge or even off the edge of the screen. The final attribute on this line is the 'gap'attribute and this determines the spacing between each container in pixels, the higher the number the greater the gap between the panels and again you can use a negative number to bring them closer. Also note that this only affects the gap between the vertical panels it doesn't affect the gap between the horizontal panels. Another type of container can be found on line #18; <container default_height="384" priority="1"> These containers are used in conjunction with the adaptive containers, you'll notice in this case we haven't assigned the container a class that is because the class attribute isn't always needed for a container. The 'default_height'attribute as the name suggests sets the height of the panel in pixels and the reason why this is needed is because this container is nested within the adaptive container, and for the adaptive container to work it needs to have the height of the various panels set so it knows if it can display them or not. There are two values the height attribute can take either a positive whole number which will set a height of that many pixels or you can also use a negative number, if you use a negative number it will tell the game to stretch this panel to fill up the remaining space, if there is more than one negative panel the number will determine the split as a ratio (more detail on this will be coming later). In addition to the 'default_height'attribute there are also 'minimum_height'and 'maximum_height'attributes as well as 'default_width', 'minimum_width'and 'maximum_width'attributes for horizontal adaptive containers that all act in the same way. You can also combine these values to give your item a dynamic size depending on screen resolution, if you set both a default and maximum value then the game will display your item at the default size, but if it has space left it will expand up to the maximum size. Whilst if you set a minimum value then the game will only display the item if the available room is at least this amount. The other attribute on this line is the 'priority'attribute which is again linked to the adaptive container, this attribute tells the game which containers to prioritize showing when there isn't enough space, and the lower the number the higher the priority, so a priority value of 1 means it will always show, which is why the Position and Form panels disappear at lower resolutions as they have a lower priority and there isn't enough room to show them. Widget Attribute Types To show some examples of the widget attribute types a better example to use is the 'match title bar score' xml file which is the file used to display the team names and scores on the match screen pitch when you have the titlebar hidden. First as an exercise I want you to locate and copy over the default file to the 'my_first_skin/panels' folder. Now I want you to locate this code on line #25; <widget class="text" id="Mclk" size="12" width="80" alignment="centre" style="semi_bold" colour="match text"> Like the container element the widget element starts with a 'class'attribute which determines what kind of widget we are going to be using, in this case we have a text widget which as the name implies is used to display some text on the screen. The next attribute is the 'id'attribute and this tells us what kind of text to display in this case the id tells the game to display the match clock. The next attribute sets the size of the text that displays, the 'width'attribute sets the width of the widget. The 'alignment'attribute determines how the text is positioned in this case it is centred in the widget, you can also have it left or right aligned as well as top or bottom, you can also combine vertical and horizontal alignments to have "top, left"for example. The 'style'attribute determines what style font is used (i.e. bold, italic, shadowed, embossed etc. Lists of styles can be found in the xml files in the fonts folder). The 'colour'attribute sets the colour of the font; though note that this can in some cases be overridden by values set elsewhere or for some annoying items is hardcoded. Another example for the widget can be found on line #38; <widget class="picture" id="T1bp" auto_size="vertical" file="boxes/custom/match/scoreboard/team/paper" cached="true" rthr="68"> This case shows an example of the picture class widget, and again has similar attributes to the other elements, first the class tells us this is a picture, the id tells the game we want to display the home teams background colour. The 'file'attribute tells the game what graphic to display, note that it doesn't need the graphics folder declared but it does need the subfolders inside the graphics folder declared and you also need to point to an actual graphic rather than just the folder. The final attribute on this line we are interested in is the 'rthr'attribute and this is used when the game recolours a graphic from code, in this case the graphic becomes the home team background picture and is recoloured by the game to match the background colour of the home team. There are a load more classes of widgets in the game but they generally work the same as these two, there are also a lot more attributes that can be applied to the widget elements, the easiest way to find these is to look through the xml files and look at the attributes assigned to the various widgets, most of them should have simple names that describe what they do. Layout Attribute Types Finally we are going to look at some of the attribute types for the layout element, now these can be fairly tricky to work out as you sometimes need to use combinations of them and different screens require different layout values, if you get stuck with these when moving items the best thing to do is to see how the elements near where you are placing your code is written and try and copy that, and if you are modifying items rather than moving them then the best method is to adjust the values of one attribute in the element and see what it does before adjusting another. The below layout element is probably the most common one you'll come across; <layout class="stick_to_sides_attachment" alignment="all" inset="2" /> The 'stick_to_sides_attachment'class tells the game to stick the related item (normally a container or widget) to the side of its parent. The 'alignment'then tells the game what side to stick it to, with the 'inset'(or 'offset') attribute telling the game how far from the edge to stick the item. In this example the inset value of two tells us we want the item stuck two pixels away from the side with the all alignment telling the game we want it stuck two pixels away from all the sides. Inset and offset values have to be whole numbers but can be negative or positive. Alignment values can also be top, bottom, left, right, horizontal or vertical; you can also combine them "top, left"or "top, right"etc. Also if you want to have a different inset from different sides you can split the line up to read something like; <layout class="stick_to_sides_attachment" alignment="top" inset="2" /> <layout class="stick_to_sides_attachment" alignment="right" inset="10" /> These set your item to appear two pixels in from the top and 10 pixels in from the right. Another example line is; <layout class="arrange_horizontal_attachment" offset="0" layout="-4, -6" gap="8" /> In this case the 'class'attribute means we have several items we want to display side-by-side; this is normally used when you are displaying multiple containers. As the layout attribute has two values this means we have two items to show side by side, with the negative numbers meaning we want both of these items to scale with resolution rather than be a fixed size. With the actual numbers telling the game what ratio of space each item should take up. To calculate the ratios you add the two numbers together in this case we get 10 (4+6) which then gives you the ratio of each item, in this case the left item will take up 4/10 of the space whilst the right item will take up the remaining 6/10, if you want both items to use up the same space set them to the same value (-1 normally). There is also an 'arrange_vertical_attachment'class that works in the same way but vertically rather than horizontally and will display items on top of each other. The other layout class you will come across is this; <layout class="fit_children_attachment" alignment="horizontal,fill" gap="0" offset="0" /> This class also tells the game you want to display several items one after another and is generally used for displaying multiple widgets. The alignment value this time determines how they appear, with a horizontal value setting them side-by-side and a vertical one putting them on top of each other, the fill value tells them to fill out the space one after another. Summary The container, layout and widget elements combine to form the vast majority of the coding in the xml files. First you will generally call a container to group the content together, next you will use several layout elements to determine how the grouped content is laid out then finally you will use the widget elements to display an item in game before closing the container. A full example of how each of these elements interacts can be found in the 'match title bar score' xml file; <container class="bordered_box" appearance="boxes/custom/match/scoreboard/container/paper">< <layout class="arrange_horizontal_attachment" alignment="horizontal" gap="0" offset="0" /> <layout class="fit_children_attachment" alignment="horizontal,fill" gap="0" offset="0" /> <layout class="stick_to_sides_attachment" alignment="vertical" layout_children="true" inset="0" /> <container width="10" /> <!--home button--> <widget class="icon_button" id="homb" click_event="home" height="30" width="40" appearance="buttons/custom/match/exit/button" icon="icons/16px/home" icon_alignment="centre"> <layout class="centre_in_parent_attachment" alignment="vertical" offset="0" /> </widget> <!--clock--> <widget class="text" id="Mclk" size="12" width="80" alignment="centre" style="semi_bold" colour="match text"> <layout class="stick_to_sides_attachment" alignment="top" inset="1" /> </widget> <widget class="text" id="Mijt" size="8" width="40" alignment="centre" colour="match scoreboard added time" style="semi_bold"> <layout class="stick_to_sides_attachment" alignment="top" inset="1" /> </widget> ... The first line tells the game we want the following content nested inside a container with the settings of a bordered_box but with a custom appearance. The layout elements then tell the game we want the nested items to display side-by-side with no gap, and we have several widgets to be displayed in a row, then as the other lines have set our horizontal placement we use the another layout element to set our vertical placement. Next we have a blank container element; a width value is set to give us some padding from the left of the screen. We then follow with some widget elements to display some items in game; we first display a home button and nest a layout element inside the widget element to centre it vertically. Next we use some text widget elements to display the time and added time. I haven't pasted in the rest of the code from that file, but if you look at the xml file you'll see the file contains similar code to create a new container nested inside the existing one to display the team name on top of the team background bar rather than alongside it like the rest of the content, this is because these widgets positions within the nested container are determined by the layout code within their container rather than the layout code within the parent container, the parent layout code only applies to the position of the nested container but not the code nested inside the container, thus by nesting the team name code within a new container you are able to display the name on top of the graphic when the previous code had items displaying side-by-side, then when you close the team name container we have another widget this time displaying the scoreboard which appears side-by-side again, we then finish with an away team container and an aggregate score widget before finally closing the initial container. Other bits If you are using Notepad++ to edit your xml files you'll notice that it gives different items different colours; tags and elements have a blue colour, attributes are red, attribute values are purple and comments are green. You can use this to give you a quick visual notification to make sure you haven't mistyped something. (Other programs may also colour the code but might use different colours). Notepad++ can also try to help you by drawing grey vertical lines to try connecting open tags with the corresponding closing tag, though be aware this feature doesn't always link the correct ones. You may also have noted that various lines are indented differently with nested items having a further indent than their parent and linked open and close tags having the same indentation that can help keep track of which tags are linked. You can find downloadable versions (pdf and docx versions at the moment) of this guide at the bottom of this page on my website. --- Redistribution Terms You are free to post this content to your website provided: 1. It is not sold or behind a paywall. 2. You don't advertise it as being exclusive to your website. 3. My username and blog address are included: http://michaeltmurrayuk.blogspot.co.uk/ If linking to the guide please link to this page rather than the direct download links as the links may change with updates.
  4. I have managed to get this to work on FM16 except for one problem, I can't see the very bottom line on the information tab (the yes/no for undersoil heating and stadium condition text. What would I need to change to get this to display? I assume it is to do with the height of something?
  5. I'm using my own custom skin, but these issues are in the default skin too. I think this is only after the latest 15.2.1 update? On the club general page the 'clickable' players are not aligned with the 'non clickable' ones: Also, shouldn't the tactics pitch be generated with the best 11 players rather than be blank? Always has been on previous versions..
  6. Football Manager 2015 Guide - How To Increase the Transparency of Screens NOTE: THIS GUIDE APPLIES TO 2015 FULL MODE SKINS NOT FMC SKINS. This is a simple guide to tell you how to increase the transparency of various screens in Football Manager 2015, to make it easier to see your background images or to see the pitch on the match screens better with various widgets open. Before you start you will need a couple of things; - If you are using the Default skins, then first download the Base Skins as any changes you make will need to be applied to them rather than the default skins, if you are using a downloaded skin then you should be able to edit that skin directly. - You will need an image editing program that can handle transparent png files, a free option is paint.net, which I'll be using in this guide. - You will need to have downloaded the Resource Archiver for Football Manager, this is obtained from the Library -> Tools menu in Steam. You will need to have used this tool to extract the contents of the skins.fmf file located in the data folder of where you installed Football Manager 2015. If you do not know how to extract files then read this: [FM2015 Guide] How to Extract Default Files & Understanding File Structure - Have a copy of the Background image you are using in FM, if you are using changing background images pick an image. 1. First we need to copy various files that you extracted from the skins.fmf file to the graphics folder of the Base Skin (or the skin you are using). Which files you need to copy over depends on what parts of the skin you want more transparent: The General Skin Background Overlay is located in this folder: \skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\custom\background\ The Match Screen Background Overlay is located here: \skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\custom\match\background\ The Match Widgets are Located here: \skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\custom\match\widgets\ The Match Feed Dropdown is located here: \skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\popup\match\ The Match Between Highlights Panel is located here: \skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\custom\match\between highlights\ You now need to copy the files from each (or the files that you want to edit) of those folders to the same location in the Base Skin (If you are using a custom skin that already has these files present you don't need to both copying them over). For example to edit the General Skin Background Overlay you would copy the contents of the \skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\custom\background\ folder into the following location: \skins\base_dark2015\graphics\boxes\custom\background\ You will need to create any folders or sub-folders that don't already exist within the Base Skins folders, when done the graphics folder of your Base Skin should look something like this: 2. Next you need to determine the level of Opacity/Transparency you want the images to have, if you already know you can skip to the next step, if you are not sure the best method is to open a copy of your choosen Background image in Paint.net. Then from the Layer Menu select Add New Layer. With the new layer selected in the layers panel select the fill tool and fill the new layer (you can adjust the RGB of this new layer to match the default in game overlay colour which is red="56" green="62" blue="82"). Now from the Layers -> Layer Properties Option adjust the Opacity of the new layer until it is at a level you are happy with. Make a note of this value. 3. With the level of Opacity now known, you can edit the actual files. If not already open, open the folder that contains the images you have copied over for example open the \skins\base_dark2015\graphics\boxes\custom\background\ folder and inside you should see a couple of files: The file we care about inside here is the paper.png file (if you are planning on releasing the finished files, or use the zoom in modes you'll also want to edit the paper@2x.png file as this is the image used when zoomed in). The red/blue colour of these images doesn't matter as they are now recoloured by the game so you don't need to mess around with the colour of the images. Now open this file in paint.net and from the Layers -> Layer Properties Option adjust the Opacity level to your desired setting, once happy save the file. BUT DO NOT EXIT PAINT.NET OR CLOSE THE IMAGE FILE you need to keep the file open so you can adjust the opacity level further if need be. 4. With the first file saved load up Football Manager 2015, and if the skin cache is on turn it off and reload your skin (if you have been using the Default Skins before this then make sure you have switched to the Base Skin). Now check that the transparency on the screens you have edited is what you want, if it is move onto the next step. If the Opacity level isn't correct go back to paint.net and adjust the opacity again and resave the file (if you closed the file from paint.net you will need to get the orginal file you extracted as the opacity level won't be directly editable if you reopen the edited file). When done, from Football Manager go into the Preferences menu and reload your skin and check the screen again, repeat until you are happy. 5. Now with the Opacity level set up how you want it is just a case of repeating the above steps for the rest of the images you need to adjust, However to save time you can just copy some of the edited images to another folder rather than having to edit all the images, for example you'll not that the background and match background images are just red squares, so for these you just need to edit one image and copy it to the over folder if you want both images to have the same opacity. Once you have edited all the files you want and checked them in game you are done. What I would advise is to have a save game saved just before a match as some of the match screens can only be checked during a live match. You can also apply the guide to various other panels and files in the game if you wish. --- Redistribution Terms You are free to post this content to your website provided: 1. It is not sold or behind a paywall. 2. You don't advertise it as being exclusive to your website. 3. My username and blog address are included: http://michaeltmurrayuk.blogspot.co.uk/
  7. I can't seem to get these working in FM16. Can you please check if the placing location is the same?
  8. I'm sure everyone has noticed that the scroll bar at the scouting section stoped working like it used to since FM15. Now FM16 is out and the problem remains. I have posted this issue in the FM16 Beta bugs section and in the Feedback Thread and had no reply. So, maybe our good old michaeltmurray can help us: is there any way to fix the scroll bar to work like in FM14, we were able to drag the scroll bar and the player list would also move up and down ?
  9. Hello, I can’t remember the file name for the following arrows highlighted in the image below: Does anyone know what the file name is for the two respective arrows so that I can change them? I would like to change the “up” arrow to a custom graphic as well as the “green arrow”. …\Documents\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015\skins\Scorpio\graphics\icons
  10. Hello, I need some help to increase the width of this box. Does anyone know which file to edit ?
  11. Hello, I need to edit the text in the statistics section if at all possible please. As you can see the word Non Competitive is overlapping the numbers. Is it a simple edit?
  12. Could someone help by telling me how I can add a background to this please As you can see the writing overlaps and I need to add a darker background. Also could someone help by telling me which panel controls the inbox font size. Thanks in advance. I have found another problem I could do with some help with please. How do I add dark background and move the writing down a little on this. Thanks
  13. Football Manager 2015 Skinning Guide Part 4: Editing the Skin Graphics Welcome to the fourth part of my updated Skinning Guide for FM2015. Before reading this guide make sure you have read the previous parts of the guide as well as the extracting files guide, as this guide will assume you have followed those guides. The previous parts of the guide talked you through creating a new skin and then changing the fonts and some of the font settings, before telling you how to change most of the text colour. This part of the guide will talk you through how to change the appearance of the actual skin graphics. As it is fairly long I have also included a quick recap at the end. Before starting I advise you have the following folder locations open: - Your 'Working' Folder Location from the previous guide (which is where you extracted the default game files to). - The my_first_skin folder within your Saving Location. You will also need to have your preferred xml file editor and image editing programs open as well as FM2015. Locating the default graphic files Like with the font settings (and everything else) the skin graphics work on a hierarchy system which means you only need to copy over files you are planning on editing into your skin, if you don't copy the files over the game will just use the default files. The first thing you need to do is locate where in the 'Working' Folder the default skin graphics are located, and like with the text settings they are located in various places, however instead of being located inside the settings folder the graphics are aptly located inside the graphics folder. The first location you need to check are the folders for the parent skin to your skin (when skinning this should always be the first place you look for files), if you cannot remember which parent skin you set then open the 'skin_config.xml' file located within the 'my_first_skin' folder and locate the parent line that looks like this: <flags id="parent" value="fm dark-widgets" /> In this case the parent skin we need to look in is 'fm dark-widgets'. So in your Working folder browse to the 'skins\fm dark-widgets'folder, but notice that there is no graphics folder for this skin, that is because this skin has no unique graphics and inherits from its parent skin. Now what you need to do is locate the parent skin for the 'fm dark-widgets' skin and check if the parent skin has a graphics folder. The parent skin to the 'fm dark-widgets' skin is the 'fm' skin and whilst this skin has a graphics folder it is empty apart from a config file, so you now need to look in that skins parent skin. Now you should be in the 'skins\fm-widgets\graphics' folder and notice a load of folders these folders contain the skin graphics for full mode skins. This folder is where you will be taking most of your skin graphics from. Graphics are also located in the 'graphics' folder located in the root of your Working folder; this location contains the general game graphics (logos, kits, pitch graphics etc…) but you shouldn't really need to touch these for basic skins, you might touch the main menu folder if you want to change the title screen but that is about it for a skin. Graphics format Now you have located the default graphics you need to understand how they work. The first thing to understand is that the format of the skin graphics in FM15 has changed from previous versions, and whilst it may look more complicated at first it actually makes things easier long term. The easiest way to explain how the graphics work is to show you in an example, so what I want you to do is to browse to the following location within your 'Working' Folder: \skins\fm-widgets\graphics\boxes\subsection\standard Then if you haven't already load up FM15, make sure the 'My First Skin (Dark)' Skin is loaded (or whatever skin it is you are creating if you gave it a different name) and browse to the Overview -> Attributes screen for one of your players. Inside the standard folder you will notice several png files and an xml file, skin graphics consist of three items, two of which you can see here; Png graphic This controls the basic layout of the graphic, in this folder you can see we have a png file called paper which is a pinkish colour with round edges, it is pink because the file has some transparency but we will explain the reason for the actual colour in bit. This graphic controls among other things the shape of the box that surrounds the player attributes panel on the player profile screen that you should be on in the game – note how the attributes box in game has rounded corners and has some transparency to it. There is also a png file with the @2x bit in it, these files are used when you use one of the zoomed in modes and are to ensure that the skin still looks sharp when zoomed, and in basic terms you just create this with double the dimensions of your normal graphic. Xml file The next file we are interested in is the xml file, the xml file will take the same name as the base graphic (in this case paper) and this controls the settings of the graphic, however for basic skinning you shouldn't really need to edit these files, you'll mainly use them as a reference to see how the colours are controlled, but I'll explain in detail what each of these settings do in the next section of this guide. Colour Settings You'll notice that whilst the actual paper png file is pink, in game the box appears dark grey, this is because as alluded to in the previous guide graphic colours are now controlled by the same code that colours the text rather than by the actual graphics. I'll cover this in more detail later but it basically makes recolouring your skins a whole lot easier than in the past as you no longer need to manually colour and recolour loads of png files (the other advantage is that all the default graphics are now located in one place rather than several like in the past). Changing the appearance of the graphics Now I am going to run you through some basic examples of how to edit the skin graphics, we will again use the subsection box graphics as an example. First you need to copy some of the existing contents of the standard box over to your 'my_first_skin' however when copying files over they need to keep the same file structure so to copy over the contents of the standard folder you will also need to create the same file structure as found in the default files. So browse to your 'my_first_skin' folder and inside it create a new folder called 'graphics', then inside that folder create a new folder called 'boxes', then inside that create a new one called 'subsection' and then inside that create a new folder called 'standard'. Finally from the Working folder copy over the 'paper.xml' file (we don't need the other ones for this example) to your newly created standard subfolder, so inside your 'my_first_skin' folder you should have something that looks like this: Now what I want you to do is to open your preferred image editing program and create a square image, of 400x400 pixels. Now make the right hand side of the image red (RGB: 255, 0, 0), the left had side blue (RGB: 0, 0, 255) now cut a triangle out of the bottom left corner and a curved bit from the top right hand corner leaving the cut areas transparent. Now add a green (RGB: 0, 255, 0) trim around the edges of the coloured bits so you are left with a shape that looks like this (the exact shape doesn't really matter, and you can save and use my example if you want to save some time): Now save the image as a png file (make sure the transparency/opacity option is set if available) call it paper and save it into the above location. Now reload your skin in FM and the attributes part of the player profile screen should now look a bit like this: You'll notice that the in game image doesn't quite look the same as the image you created (colour is different and shape is slightly wrong) this is because the graphic is also controlled by the 'paper.xml' file that is also located in the folder. Now open the 'paper.xml' file and you'll see various bits of code, most of this code is commented to explain what it does but I'll give you a quick explanation and some examples below. Image Borders <record id="image_borders" left="10" right="10" top="35" bottom="5"/> This determines how far inset from the sides the content of the box appears, so for example if you adjust the left value to 50 and then reload the skin you'll see the margin on the left has increased, however note that the title hasn't shifted over as this line doesn't affect the title, which is why you'll notice that the top value is set to 35 and not 5 like the bottom, if you set the top value to 5 and reload your skin you'll see the attribute tables have shifted upwards and now cover the title text. Title Inset <integer id="title_top_inset" value="8"/> <integer id="title_bottom_inset" value="0"/> <integer id="title_left_inset" value="10"/> <integer id="title_right_inset" value="10"/> These bits of code determine the position of the title text for the box, and act in the same way as the image_borders code. The other option is the title properties one but this just controls the font used for the title text, you can change the value to point to a different font if want, for full details on how to change the font settings check the previous parts of the guide. Though for the most part you shouldn't really need to mess around with either of these settings as the default settings will be fine most of the time, the only reason to really adjust them is if you want to free up some extra space or you have a fancy pattern that you need to fit the text around, though bear in mind if you increase these values too much content might start disappearing if it cannot fit in as there is only so much space available (also be aware that the box and panel sizes change depending on your resolution, so if you are making a skin for the community keep in mind that your fancy design might not work well at a smaller resolution – a good thing to do when skinning is to test your skin at both the resolution you play in and shrunk down to the smallest supported resolution of 1024x768 to ensure the greatest user base for your skin.) Image Slices <record id="image_slices" left="8" right="8" top="8" bottom="8"/> The next bit of code is new for FM15 and determines how the graphic is split up so it can be resized to fit in the space assigned, in the past you had to manually slice up your graphic files; however this is now done in code for FM15 which makes things a whole lot easier. Unless you are radically altering the shape of the graphics you shouldn't really need to worry about messing around with these settings. Though in this example I have purposely made a shape that is misaligned in the bottom left corner using the default values. In basic terms what the game does is split each graphic up into pieces (either 3, 6 or 9 pieces depending on how many directions the image needs to stretch) so the game can dynamically size the skin graphics in the game without either the skinner having to create multiple individual graphics of fixed sizes to fit each situation or leave the game with fixed sized content. In this example the image is sliced at 8 pixels in every corner which gives you something like this (with the black dotted line roughly representing where the image is split): Which gives nine pieces for this graphic – the top left and bottom right corners are solid green, whilst the top right and bottom left corners are both transparent, these pieces will be fixed 8x8 images in game. Next we have the top and bottom slices, these will have a height of 8 pixels, but their width will be resized to fit whatever the width of the panel is in game, however it will keep the same dimensions, so the percentage of the width that is transparent compared to the solid colour (outside of the corners) should be the same no matter the width of the box. (You can test this in game by changing your resolution and you'll notice the attribute panel box resizes but the transparent part is kept in proportion with the solid part no matter the size of the panel). A similar thing happens with the left and right side pieces, but these will be a fixed 8 pixels in width whilst stretching vertically to fill the space, again keeping the transparent section in portion no matter the height of the box. Finally you have the middle section that is resized both vertically and horizontally to fill up the rest of the space. In this example due to the way the slices are drawn the border in the bottom left diagonal doesn't line up with the bottom, so we will need to adjust the slicing to get them to fit. If you have to adjust the slicing values to fit a shape in it is best to adjust the slicing so the shape is within a static part (Ideally in a corner). In this example we can either adjust the bottom slicing or the left slicing. In this example the diagonal piece takes up about 120x120 pixels – you can get the value by either trial and error or by creating a copy of your image (so you don't accidentally overwrite your actual image) and then cropping the bit you want to get its size. So to get the corner to line up perfectly and keep the same shape you want to set both the left and bottom slicing to the same values of about 120 pixels, this then changes the left bottom corner piece from a 8x8 pixel transparent square in a 120x120 pixel which includes the diagonal border bit and as this is now a static piece it fits in with both the left and bottom sides: However note that the middle of the panel is no longer split half black half grey, this is because when we changed the left slicing we changed the middle piece from being half black, half grey to more like 2/3 grey and 1/3 black. You can even this back out by just increasing the right slicing to 120 making the middle piece again half black and grey. Another thing to consider is when creating actual graphics for your skin you don't need to make them this big, if you noticed the default graphic is only 32x32 pixels. The less complicated your pattern the smaller you can make your graphic. Changing the Graphic Colours You'll notice despite making our graphic out of red, green and blue colours the game has recoloured our graphic to black and grey, this is because the other new skinning feature for FM15 is that the skin graphic colours are now controlled by code in the xml files rather than by the actual graphics, which again is a bit complicated at first but in the long term will be a great time saver, as it now means recolouring a skin is just a case of changing some values in an xml file instead of you having to manually recolour or even recreate hundreds of png files. The first thing to know is that when creating new graphics (or modifying existing ones) is that you only want to use three colours in the graphic; Red (255, 0, 0), Green (0,255,0) and Blue (0,0,255). The normal convention is to use Red as the main colour of a graphic whilst using Blue and Green for highlights such as a border, pattern or shadow effect. Though the game doesn't care what order you put the colours in or how you use them as they are defined by yourself later anyway, it's just easier to keep to the same system used by default as it means you don't need to keep on looking back at the actual graphics when you are recolouring it later in the code. So still using the same example as before I want you to look in the 'paper.xml' file and near the bottom you will see the following lines of code: <colour id="red_replacement" name="box_background"/> <colour id="green_replacement" name="box_shadow"/> <colour id="blue_replacement" name="box_border"/> These lines tell the game what Colour Name Variable to assign to the Red, Green and Blue bits of your graphic, so in this example the Red colour is assigned to the box_background Colour Variable. However there is nothing in this file to tell us or the game what colour the box_background colour actually this. This is because like with the text settings the actual colour is determined by the settings set by the xml files in the settings file and these values are edited in exactly the same way as the text colours are. If you look in the 'my_first_skin\settings\my_first_skin settings.xml' file you will see we don't have any of the three above Colour Names declared in this file, which means the colours are being set by either the settings for our parent skin or by the default colour settings. As a simple exercise I want you to locate the three above colour names (box_background, box_shadow and box_border). Hopefully you should have found those three variables near the top of the 'fm dark-widgets settings.xml' file which look like this: <!-- Standard Box - titled box, subsection box, bordered box, tabbed box etc--> <colour name="box_background" red="49" green="52" blue="63"/> <!-- Box background colour - red_replacement --> <colour name="box_border" red="30" green="30" blue="30"/> <!-- Box border- blue_replacement --> <colour name="box_shadow" red="0" green="0" blue="0"/> <!-- Box shadow colour - green_replacement --> You'll notice that with these lines are some comments that tell you what colours they replace by default which should help you out at the start, though note in our case the graphic we designed used the green colour as the border not the blue, so adjusting the box_border value wouldn't in this case change the green border of our graphic but the blue half of our graphic – the names of the Colour Variables aren't important, the important bit is what colours they replace. There are several methods to actually change the colours. The simplest method is to just change the RGB values of the Colour Names the replacement colours are set to. To adjust the colour you need to change the values for each component. Valid values range from 0 to 255, where 255,255,255 is white, 0,0,0 is black, 255,0,0 is red, 0,255,0 is green etc… Next you need to know the RGB value of the colour you want, the easiest way to get this is from an image editing program. (Or you can use trial and error to get close to what you want, one thing I would suggest is avoid setting values to 255 as they can be a bit bright, using 248 or 240 tends to give a softer colour that looks better). So load up paint.net, and in the Colors panel at the bottom left click the more button to expand the panel and it will now show the RGB value of the selected colour and as you change the colour on the colour wheel you'll see the RGB values change. Alternatively there is a colour picker included within the game – just go to Preferences -> Interface -> Skin Colours, then click on one of the existing colours and a colour selector pops up where you can select a colour and get its RGB value. So what you now need to do is to copy the box colour codes from the 'fm dark-widgets settings.xml' file into the 'my_first_skin settings.xml' file. Now I want you to adjust the RGB values of each item, the values aren't important but these are the ones I have used as an example: <colour name="box_background" red="50" green="150" blue="150"/> <colour name="box_border" red="150" green="50" blue="50"/> <colour name="box_shadow" red="248" green="200" blue="0"/> Which gives me something that looks like this in game: So with a simple change of the RGB values above I have managed to make the blue part of our actual graphic appear red whilst making the red part appear blue and the green appear yellow, if I am not happy with these colours or the shade changing them is now just a matter of tweaking the RGB values until I am happy, which is a whole lot easier than previous games where you'd have to actually adjust the colour of your graphic until you are happy. However one problem you'll have noticed is that when we recoloured this box it also recoloured the rest of the boxes on this screen even though they actually use a different graphic, this is because as you may have noticed from the comments in the file these three Colour Variables control the colours of most of the boxes in the game. In a normal situation this is exactly what you want to happen, by just changing those three lines of code you have recoloured most of your skins graphics, however you'll notice that the other boxes are a different shade of blue and have no yellow or red in them, this is because they are still using the default graphic file which if you remember was just a slightly transparent red image, as their base image has no blue or green in it there is nothing for the game to recolour, if you wanted these images to change you'd need to actually change the base graphic that makes up these boxes as we did above for the subsection box. As this is a guide what we want to do next is assign the subsection box graphic to its own unique colours. To do this what you need to do is go back to the 'paper.xml' file and locate these three lines again; <colour id="red_replacement" name="box_background"/> <colour id="green_replacement" name="box_shadow"/> <colour id="blue_replacement" name="box_border"/> And what we are going to do is change the name they are assigned to. There are a couple of ways to do this the simplest one is to simply assign them to a different pre-existing Colour Name, and to make matters easier the Colour Name doesn't need to be declared in your skins settings file the game will still read the values from your parent skin or from the default files (if you want to use a colour not from your parent skin you need to ensure the colour isn't declared in the parent skin otherwise you will need to copy the colour over to your skin). As an example I am going to reassign the above values to the below names: <colour id="red_replacement" name="low attribute"/> <colour id="green_replacement" name="yellow card"/> <colour id="blue_replacement" name="colour side bar"/> So the Red parts of the graphic have been assigned to the 'low attribute' Colour Name, which if you followed the last guide should be declared in your 'my_first_skin settings.xml' file. (Which should be a Red colour) The Green parts have been assigned to the 'yellow card' Colour Name which is drawn from the 'fm dark-widgets settings.xml' file. (Bright Yellow) The Blue parts have been assigned to the 'colour side bar' Colour Name which is drawn from the 'fm colours.xml' file. (Dark Grey) When assigning the Colour Names it doesn't matter if you use ones that are normally assigned to text colours, as the game doesn't make any distinction between text and graphic colours, you just need to be careful if you change the RGB values of a variable that is also assigned to a bit of text as it will also change the text colour. After you have carried out the above changes, reload your skin in FM15 and your player profile screen should now look something like this: As you can see the attribute box has been recoloured to red and black with a yellow border, whilst the other boxes have kept the previously set blue colour (if you want you can delete the three box lines we previously added to the settings file to set them back to the default grey colour). Another option if you cannot find existing colours that suit is to just create your own custom Colour Name variables and assign them the RGB values you want, you can call these variables anything you want you just need to make sure you are using unique names that haven't already been used elsewhere by the game otherwise you'll end up recolouring random bits of your skin. To do this you first need to change the names the replacement colours are assigned to in the 'paper.xml' file so for example I am going to change them to the following names: <colour id="red_replacement" name="example_red"/> <colour id="green_replacement" name="example_border"/> <colour id="blue_replacement" name="example2"/> Next you need to add and declare these custom Colour Names in the settings file so in the 'my_first_skin settings.xml' file paste in the following code: <colour name="example_red" red="150" green="175" blue="150"/> <colour name="example_border" red="75" green="75" blue="75"/> <colour name="example2" red="175" green="125" blue="125"/> This gives you this in game (with the old box colours removed so the other boxes reset to default colours): You can add as many custom Colour Names to your skin as you want, you just need to remember to locate the xml file that declares what Colour Names the replacement colours are assigned to, a future guide will give you some hints on how to find these files, though some bits are hardcoded to either a certain colour or a certain Colour Name so your ability to adjust these items are limited. How to only recolour the skin If you only want to change the colour of the skin and not the shape or pattern of the graphics that make up the skin, then you can skip a few steps. In this case the only file you need to really edit is the 'my_first_skin settings.xml' file and is done in pretty much the same way as you editing the text colours. What you need to do is copy over the colour code from the default settings and colours xml files that corresponds to the part of the skin you want to recolour. Now most of this code is commented so it should be relatively easy to work out what it controls, if you aren't sure you can copy the code over and then adjust the RGB value to a distinct colour and have a look at what has change in game. I'll give some hints on how to found out what does what in a later guide, however for the moment some trial and error should get you most of the way and if you still cannot find out what controls something just have a look in the forum to see if it has already been asked and if not just open up your own thread and hopefully someone will have found the answer. What I would advise when doing this is to copy over the code for one item, recolour and check it, then paste the code for the next item and repeat until everything is recoloured, as if you copy over all the colour settings at the start you might get a bit lost regarding what you have changed. What you can also do is add your own comments to the xml files, so you can note that you have changed something, or if you have just found what something controls you can make a comment telling you what it controls. Recap As this has been a fairly long guide I'll do a quick recap. The first thing you need to do is locate where the default graphic files are, which for dark full-mode skins should be contained within the 'skins\fm-widgets\graphics' folder. The exact location can be a bit tricky to work out, but I'll give you some tips in a later guide. Next if you want to edit the actual graphic or change the settings within its xml file you need to copy the png or xml file you want to edit into the same location for your skin, which involves creating the same folder path if not already present within your skin. (Though instead of copying the png graphic over you can create a new png file in the same location for your skin, you can also create a new xml file if you wish and manually type the code but it's easier to just copy the xml files and then edit). If you are editing the shape or pattern of the graphic the only three colours you can use are Red (RGB: 255,0,0) Green (RGB: 0,255,0) and Blue (RGB: 0,0,255) as the game now recolours the graphics. (If you use other colours the game will still recolour them but it might not recolour them correctly). If you have given your new graphic a non-uniform shape or pattern the next thing you need to do is make sure everything lines up correctly in game. If it doesn't then you may need to adjust the image slicing, the image borders or the title inset values in the xml file until everything fits. When recolouring the skin graphics there are a couple of methods depending on what you want. The first thing you need to do is to work out what Colour Names each base colour is replaced by, to do this you need to check in the xml file which has the same name as the graphic and is located in the same folder. If you are wanting to recolour the skin in general, then once you have located the correct Colour Names it is just a case of copying these into the xml file inside the settings folder for your skin (if not already present) and then adjusting the RGB values to suit. However if you are only wanting to adjust the colours of this particular item, then you can change the Replacement Colour Names in the graphics xml file and either assign them to an existing variable that has the correct colour or create a custom Colour Name and then declare its RGB values in the settings xml file. Once that is done check how it looks in game and if you are happy then move onto the next item. And in no time at all you should have a nicely recoloured skin. You can find downloadable versions (pdf and docx versions at the moment) of this guide at the bottom of this page on my website. --- Redistribution Terms You are free to post this content to your website provided: 1. It is not sold or behind a paywall. 2. You don't advertise it as being exclusive to your website. 3. My username and blog address are included: http://michaeltmurrayuk.blogspot.co.uk/
  14. Removing that code from 'pie condition label.xml' does not do anything. Well, actually putting that file into skins/panels disables Con and Mft columns. Both those 'pies' and number ratings. EDIT: I did it.
  15. How to change display attributes after changing them on the graphic, so that the size rectangles for all values ​​were the same? Attribute 20 and 1 will have a rectangle of the same size, it will only be distinguished color.
  16. Football Manager 2015 Base Skins As with most recent Football Managers for you to make certain changes in Football Manager 2015 you need to create a new skin. So to make things easier for people I've put up some base skins that are identical to the default skins that come with the game, so you can add new files/graphics to these without messing up the original skins, and anything that isn't located in these new skin folders will be taken from the default locations within the game. UPDATE: 13th December 2014 - Base Skins for the Alternative skins added in patch 15.2 are now up. For Football Manager 2015 you have four skins to choose from with both Light and Dark skins for both the Full Mode and FMC Mode: Dark Base Skin 2015 - This is the Default Base Skin and is identical in appearance to the Default FM2015 Dark Skin. *NEW* Base Skin 2015 - This is the Light Alternative Full Mode Skin and is based on the Default FM2015 Light Skin. Classic Base Skin - This is the Base Skin for the FMC (Classic) Mode of FM2015 and is identical in appearance to the Default FMC Skin. *NEW* Classic Dark Base Skin - This is the Dark Base Skin for the FMC (Classic) Mode of FM2015 and is identical in appearance to the Alternative Dark FMC Skin. NOTE: For the Base Skin 2015 the font settings of the Default Alternative Skin seem to be slightly different to the Default Dark Skin, as I find the font settings of the Dark Skin easier to read I have altered the font settings for the Base Skin 2015, however if you want the orignal font settings back delete the fonts folder from the Base Skin. Also the Light Base Skin has fairly solid panels compared to the Dark Skin, if you want the panels to be more transparent like the Dark Skin then delete the contents of the graphics folder. Below are a couple of screenshots, first one shows the Light Base Skin with the font settings I've included, second screenshot shows font settings from the Official Alternative Skin (what you will get if you delete the fonts folder) and the third screenshot shows what the skin will look like if you delete the graphics folder: Also as there are still some issues with the Steam Workshop I have included all the files from the Alternative skins so you do not need to have them installed before using the Alternative Base Skins this year. Change Log: v15.2 (Uploaded 10th December 2014 22:17 UK Time) - Applies to both the Dark and Classic Base Skin. - Updated to work with patch 15.2 - Updated files to patch version 15.2 - Only additions are some extra colour settings located at the bottom of the settings file. v1.1.3.1 (Uploaded 27th November 2014 13:13 UK Time) - FM DARK: Fixed colour of sidebar should be black not blue. v1.1.3 (13th November 2014) - Checked files with Retail 15.1.3 Patch. - Added a couple of missing font files to both Base Skins. This year I have also included to make things easier for people: - All the files included with the default Skins. - The Default Fonts for the FM2015 skins. - Extra entries in the settings.xml file to include all settings used by the skin into one file for ease of editing. Instructions: When you extract the file you have have downloaded you should have one folder called base_dark2015 (or base15_fmc for the FMC Skin) and a readme.txt file. Now copy the folder into your skins folder within your Saving Location, by default this is: For the Demo: \My Documents\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015 Demo\skins\ For the full game: \My Documents\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015\skins\ If you cannot find your Saving Location, load up the game and go into the preferences -> Overiew Screen, on the right of the screen should be a section headed Saving, there should be a folder location listed in the box, this is the location of your Saving folder, if you browse to that location on your computer (not through FM) there should be a skins folder located within that folder, this is where you put your downloaded skins. For example my Saving location is: S:\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015\ as shown by the below screenshot: You can also change the location of your Saving Location if you wish or reset its location to default. (you’ll need to reload the game for it to take affect) If done right your skins folder should look something like this: And inside the base_dark2015 folder you should have the following folders: When you load the game up if the skin cache is off any skins in the above folder should appear in the skins menu like the below image: NOTE That FMC skins will only appear when you are playing the FMC mode and normal skins will only appear when playing the normal mode. If the skin cache is on you'll need to turn it off, exit the Preferences menu and re-enter it and any new skins should appear, if not tick 'Always Reload Skin on Confirm' and change skins, click confirm and go back in and your skin should appear. To Replace Graphics To replace the following graphics you need to copy the graphics you have made or downloaded into the correct folders within the folder for the skin you are using: Gold Stars: My Documents\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015\skins\<SKIN_NAME>\graphics\icons\custom\star rating\senior Silver Stars: My Documents\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2011\skins\<SKIN_NAME>\graphics\icons\custom\star rating\youth To get the 2D pitch icons (balls, nets, players) into the game they no longer need to go into the skins folder and can instead now be installed directly into the graphics folder. To Edit the Fonts The font settings for each skin are now controlled by a couple of locations. Overall settings are controlled by the <SKIN_NAME> settings.xml file located inside the settings folder. For the Dark Base Skin this is the ‘\dark_base2015\settings\dark_base2015 settings.xml’ file. For the FMC Base Skin this is the ‘\base15_fmc\settings\base15_fmc settings.xml’ file. Whilst more detailed instructions for various screen and items are controlled by the various xml files located inside the fonts folder for the skin. For the base skins I have copied in the relevant coding for you to change the various text settings – style, size etc, you just need to open the <SKIN_NAME> settings.xml file scroll down to the bottom of the file until you see the TEXT SETTINGS text and edit the relevant code below that line. I've also included the various font files in the fonts folder for you to edit. To change the actual font used by the game, you will first need to copy the relevant font file into the fonts folder for your skin and then change the font name in the settings file and the fonts file. To Edit the Font Colours The colour settings for each skin are controlled by the <SKIN_NAME> settings.xml file located inside the settings folder. For the Dark Base Skin this is the ‘\dark_base2015\settings\dark_base2015 settings.xml’ file. For the FMC Base Skin this is the ‘\base15_fmc\settings\base15_fmc settings.xml’ file. For the base skins I have copied in the relevant coding for you to change the various colours used by the skin – you just need to open the <SKIN_NAME> settings.xml file and locate the relevant line for the colour setting you wish to change – the colour names and comments should explain what the majority of the colours control. The colours are declared in RGB values, that range from 0-255 where Red=255 Green=255 Blue=255 is white and Red=0 Green=0 Blue=0 is black. To locate the RGB value of a colour you want to use you can either use a image editing program to obtain the RGB Value of the colour or type rgb values into google and it will bring up several websites that list the RGB Values for various colours. NEW FOR FM2015 - How to Recolour the Game Colours A new feature for Football Manager 2015 is that the colours of the various graphics that make up the skin are now controlled by settings in the <SKIN NAME> settings.xml file located inside the settings folder. For the Dark Base Skin this is the ‘\dark_base2015\settings\dark_base2015 settings.xml’ file. For the FMC Base Skin this is the ‘\base15_fmc\settings\base15_fmc settings.xml’ file. For the base skins I have copied in the relevant coding for you to change the various colours used by the skin – you just need to open the <SKIN_NAME> settings.xml file and locate the relevant line for the colour setting you wish to change – the colour names and comments should explain what the majority of the colours control. This coding is the last section of coding in the xml file and is edited in the same way as you would change the text colours in previous versions, most of these options are also commented so it shouldn't take much time to work out what each option recolours. To Edit the Attribute Threshold This is now done in game via the Preferences -> Interface -> Skin Colours screen. For your changes to take affect If you have made any changes to the base skins (colours, fonts, graphics) to get your changes to show you’ll need to go into the Preferences -> Interface Menu and untick ‘Use caching to decrease page loading times’ if it is ticked and then tick ‘Reload skin when confirming changes in Preferences’ then click confirm and your changes should be applied, if you have previousily ticked and unticked the required boxes a 'Reload Skin' button should appear in the bottom left corner, if this button appears you can click that if the Confirm Button is grayed out. DOWNLOAD PAGE FOR FM2015 BASE SKINS (Link contains links to all downloads) --- You are free to do what you want (apart from upload to Steam Workshop as I'll upload them) with these Base Skins provided: 1. They or any skins based on them are not to be sold. 2. You don't advertise them as being exclusive to your website. 3. At least one of the download links is free to access and download. 4. If hosting the Base Skins, leave my username on them as the creator and a link to my site http://michaeltmurrayuk.blogspot.co.uk/
  17. Football Manager 2015 - List of Available Skins and Mods Welcome back to the comprehensive list of all the skins available which returns afer a break for Football Manager 2015 after people promised they'd make and submit content for it this time . If you want your skin or mod adding please scroll down to the end of this post for details. For people still using older versions please see these threads: List of Available Skins for FM2013 List of Available Skins for FM2012 List of Available Skins for FM2011 List of Available Skins for FM2010 List of Available Skins for FM2009 As always Skins will only work with the verison of FM they were made for so no using FM2012 skins with FM2015 otherwise the game may crash on you. And as a new feature for this year I have opened up the list for mods aswell as skins. When submitting mods please ensure they are mods that can just be dropped into place by endusers and don't require the editing of xml files to use with the default skins (you can for example include several options in the download where endusers pick which versions/files they copy over). Also when submitting mods please indicate whether they need to be installed within a skin or are skin independent, basically if the original files you edited came from one of the folders located within the skins.fmf file then the mod will need to be placed within a skin by the enduser. I have also included an option for you to set what permissions you grant for people to include the mod with skins they are going to release; Free To Use - Skinner doesn't have to ask your permission to include your mod with their skin. Free To Use with Credit - Skinner doesn't have to ask your permission to include your mod with their skin, but you ask for them to include a credit to you with their skin. Contact For Permission - Skinner needs to ask your permission before including your mod in their skin. See Thread/Readme - If you have your own custom permissions you want to use that aren't listed here. No Re-use - You don't grant permisson for skinners to include your mod with their skin under any circumstances, I really hope nobody selects this option. The following generic conditions will also apply to all mods: - Don't take credit for other peoples work, if they don't want credit that's fine but don't just re-release someones mod without making any changes and claim it's your work. - Under no circumstances are you to charge people to download the content. NOTE: These terms are only for including someones mod within a skin you are planning on releasing, they are not permissions for you to upload the mod to another site, also if you are just using the mods for your own use you don't need to worry about this. List of FM15 Skins: (Ordered by date of approval) Match in-Between Highlight Skins Aurum AndromedaV3 List of FMC15 Skins: (Ordered by date of approval) Match in-Between Highlight Skins List of FM15 Mods: (Ordered by date of approval) FM2015 Scoreboard Logos Mod FMC2015 Scoreboard Logos Mod Match Titlebar Team Names Mod Match Screen Kits Mod Skin Installation Instructions When you have downloaded one of the above skins you need to follow the below steps to get it into your game (plus any other steps specific to that skin from its post): First if the skin is a zip/rar file you will need to extract the file (instructions on how to unzip a file can be found here) If its an fmf file you do not need to extract it. Next you need to copy the folder you extracted or the fmf file into your skins folder this is by default (you may need to create the skins folder if it doesn’t already exist): Win Vista/7/8: C:\Users\<username>\Documents\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015\skins Win XP: C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\My Documents\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015\skins Mac OS X: /Users/<username>/Documents/Sports Interactive/Football Manager 2015/skins If you cannot find your Saving Location, load up the game and go into the Preferences and at the top right of the screen should be a section headed 'Saving', there should be a folder location listed in the box, this is the location of your Saving Location, if you browse to that location on your computer (not through FM) there should be a skins folder located within that folder, this is where you put your downloaded skins. (If a skins folder doesn't exist create one) For example my Saving Location is: S:\Sports Interactive\Football Manager 2015\ as shown by the below screenshot: If the skin came as an fmf file you just need to put the fmf file into the skins folder, if you extracted the skin from a zip/rar file you need to ensure you didn’t add an extra folder to the layout, when you copy the folder for your skin into the skins folder and go into the folder for your skin it should look something like this: In the above example you will note that within the skins folder is a folder called base_dark2015, and when you open the base_dark2015 folder you see two more folders and a xml file called skin_config – if your skins folder looks like this (with the skin_config.xml file inside one skin_name folder) then you have installed the skin correctly. To select the skin in game you will need to load the game, and go into the Preferences -> Interface menu and untick 'Use Caching to decrease page loading times' and tick 'Reload Skin when confirming changes in Preferences' then select confirm and select the skin from the drop down menu, select confirm again and your new skin should now display. (Once the skin is loaded you can turn the skin cache back on and untick the Always Reload button.) Mod Installation Instructions Installation Instructions for mods will vary depending on what they do, each individual post for a mod will include install instructions please follow those instructions to the letter, if the mod still doesn't work then make a post in the linked thread for that mod with the problem you are having. Generally to install mods you will need to copy the extracted folders/files into the folder for the skin you are using, if you are using the default skins then you will need to either download the Base Skin for the skin you are using add the mod to the Base Skin and switch to the Base Skin in game, or if the mod isn't skin dependent you can copy the mod files directly into your Saving Location, again please ensure you read the install instructions in the post for the mod as they will explain where the files need to go. Please note the above skins and mods are provided as is, and links to third party sites are out of our control, whilst we will do our best to check the links, you are advised as always to run a virus scan on any file downloaded from the internet. They are nothing to do with Sports Interactive or SEGA and won't be supported by them. --------------------------------------------- To get your skin to appear on this list you need to PM me michaeltmurrayuk some details. The information that I require is: Skins Skin Name – name of your skin Screenshots – a max. of 4 thumbnail images can be embedded into the post, you can also include text links to other images aswell. (pleae include thumbnail links not direct fullsize images) Author – If you want to be credited for your work (user name or real name, whatever you want to be known by) Game Mode - Full, FMC or Both - only set both if there are versions for both mods included at the same download page. Description – Something to describe your skin, any special features extras etc (no essays a paragraph or two is enough) Install Info – anything extra that needs to be done, apart from unzipping into the skins folder (i.e. does the right side need the left folders?) Link to thread for discussion – post a link to the thread in the skinning forum where the skin is/can be discussed. Download Link + mirrors – please ensure you post either a direct link to the file or a link to the download page. (you must provide a link to a free download that does not require registration) Mods Mod Name - Name of your Mod. Screenshots - a max. of 4 thumbnail images can be embedded into the post, you can also include text links to other images aswell. (pleae include thumbnail links not direct fullsize images) Author – If you want to be credited for your work (user name or real name, whatever you want to be known by) Game Mode - Full, FMC or Both. Description – Something to describe your skin, any special features extras etc (no essays a paragraph or two is enough). Install Info – Detailed instructions on how to install the mod i.e. unzip file and place the xml files into the panels folder of your skin. Skin Mod - Yes or No (Do the files need to be put inside the folder for the users skin or not). Permissions - Permissions for users to include your mod with their skins - Free to Use, Free to Use with credit, Contact for Permission, See thread/readme (if you have already set custom permissons) or no re-use. Link to thread for discussion – post a link to the thread in the skinning forum where the mod is/can be discussed. Download Link + mirrors – please ensure you post either a direct link to the file or a link to the download page. (you must provide a link to a free download that does not require registration) Once your request has been approved I will send you a PM and update the thread, if there is a problem I will PM you. Please ensure you have permission from the relevant people before submitting your skin/mod if you have used ANY part of another skin/mod (barring the default skins that come with the game). PM Template: Though to make things a little easier and quicker for me can you copy the formatting and layout of my posts below, thanks.
  18. Hello, i'd like to make some changes to match overview panel. How can i insert kits just above (or near) team names in the summary box (top left box as in the picture)? And how can i change the default stats (bottom left) with the coloured bars stats? Merci beaucoup for the help
  19. Hi fellow FMers. I would like to add a players media description into my skin, i know which file i have to put it into, but know know the code. This is where i would like to have it:
  20. Hi, I am currently modifying Wannachupbrew's 'Default skin with Instant Result' and have made a few minor changes. (I copied 'client object browser.xml' from the 'helveticalite Rebooted Mini' skin too make a few minor changes). But I would like to add the choice off PPM on the panels on the player overview screen. Here is what I mean. I hope that makes sense, Thanks!
  21. Hi guys. Does anybody know if it's possible and how to edit the width of the left side panel showing all messages when on the inbox screen? I would like to have more space for news items in the inbox (more width), and in order to get than, i need to shrink the width of the inbox left hand panel showing the news items. Thanks.
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