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  1. https://afmoldtimer.home.blog/2019/12/30/fm20-the-preamble-and-save-reveal/
  2. This originally appeared on Dictatethegame.com https://dictatethegame.com/2019/07/27/fm19-advanced-tactical-primer-boosting-your-4-2-3-1-possession-tactic-via-ppms/ You can still read it there in its original formating and high quality pictures. I'm the original author and an reposting it here to see if I can generate discussion about 4-2-3-1 formation, using One-Twos PPM (or your other favorite PPMs) or possession tactics in general. So let me know what you think and drop your feedback and comments below. I'm planning to make my Roma save into a long series at least until FM20 comes out. Cheers! I have been playing Football Manager since 2013 and year after year I still see the same questions pop up regarding Player Preferred Moves (PPMs or also known as Player Traits). Why do they not work how they should? My player has “Plays with back to the goal” but I never see him receiving passes and holding up the ball? How come my centreback with “Brings Ball out of Defence” does not dribble into the midfield? The game engine must be broken right? Wrong, what you see is the divergence between what his role is instructing him (including any idiosyncratic traits he possess) and the general team and/or individual player instructions. This guide will examine some popular Player Traits and explain how they can work together and be applied to a typical 4-2-3-1 tactic to enhance overall possession and scoring. Likes to Round the Keeper – one of the coolest PPMs to have on your player, given the right tactical set up and the player with the right attributes A few years back Mesut Ozil made it look easy when he decided to round Ludogoret’s keeper in the Champions League. In the game, as well as in reality, there are quiet a few complex factors that combine on the field to make the occurrence of such artistic moves more likely. In on itself, rounding the keeper might not be a game changer or even tactically significant, but it shows that in the sport of football we must take into account that each player is an individual with unique traits and idiosyncratic tendencies that a good manager must carefully pay attention to. Even though the whole match is a team performance, it consists of numerous individual performances that add up minute after minute. Thus, one can never know how one player’s single moment of brilliance could affect the flow of the rest of the game. Foremost, a competent manager must be a good manager of individuals and know each players very well, before they can claim to be a good manager of the whole team. The above statement is one reason why I prefer to work with small squads that I can study and get to know very well during the preseason. Managing large squads with multiple substitutes per position and large reserve and junior teams actually scares me. This is one reason that for the last couple of iterations managing AS Roma has always been a big temptation for me. They have one of the smallest and most focused First Teams in FM 2019. Prelude: Brazil’s 4-2-3-1 – The Magic Formation As promised in my last Shadow Striker article I will be taking a deeper look at the famous 4-2-3-1 formation. In that article I argued that this well-known shape had its origins in Brazilian leagues in the 1950s. Over the years this formation evolved into the more familiar, and very Brazilian, “Magic Box” 4-2-2-2 formation. In the Magic Box the two advanced midfielders play behind the strikers, giving the formation its pronounced narrowness. The only width comes from the two fullbacks, giving one of the reasons why this role has become so important in Brazil with some of the best fullbacks and wingbacks in the world coming from the region. Yet the 4-2-3-1 as played by Brazilian teams between 1950s and 1980s, was essentially the classic Magic Box formation in everything but name. While separate on paper, the two formations became interchangeable in Brazilian football as 4-2-3-1 would transform into 4-2-2-2 in its attacking phase. This is thanks to the two inside forwards tucking in to play through the middle (essentially as central advanced midfielders) and the shadow striker moving up to play beside the deep-lying central forward. 4-2-3-1 – One of the most flexible formations and one of the best to win and maintain possession in the middle, since it can transform into a narrow 4-2-2-2 in transition phase As result of all this movement and rearrangement, you end up with three distinct banks of players playing closely together and sharing tasks. You have the four attackers in the front mostly tasked with attack and having more creative freedom than the rest of the team to craft out moves and exercise their flair. Next there are the two defensive midfielders and center backs focusing on playing the high defensive line and preventing the opponent from advancing into our own half. The defence is definitely more structured and disciplined than the rest of the team. Finally, you have the two fullbacks, acting as the key pivots in the tactic, linking the defence and attack. They probably have the most important roles on the team, both offensively and defensively responsible in running up and down the field for the full 90 minutes. I prefer one to be more defensive than the other (usually on the side of my more attacking winger). Having broken down the team into these three distinct area, one can see how important it is to have players with complementary roles as well as the PPMs to suit them. This is especially true for your four front attackers. Speaking of those attackers, in my last article I gushed all over the Shadow Striker role, specifically when in partnership with a Deeplying Forward. Unfortunately that article turned into a theoretical analysis of these roles as I did not have enough game time to run a proper test save. Presently, after putting the tactic to a test for almost a full season with AS Roma, I can confidently say that a Shadow Striker role works as well as envisioned, if not better. I also discovered that there are some PPMs that make this role more potent when slotted into a short passing high-possession tactic. One, Two …. GOAL! In the following video, can you count the number of passes between the halfway line and the goal? The whole play takes less than fourteen seconds and is a typical example of a play that I see a lot with my latest 4-2-3-1 tactic. While testing tactics, I tend to watch most of my matches in full or at least in comprehensive highlight mode. Trust me, it helps a lot when trying to tweak your roles and instructions. Thus I was able to see the efficiency of my 4-2-3-1 tactic improve drastically from when I first tried it with Fiorentina to my move to Roma. My goals scored have increased (while at same time keeping more clean sheets) and the team has started playing a much more beautiful brand of football, almost like Tiki-Taka in its approach with one key difference. As you can see in an above video, it is a possession-heavy style with plenty of short, quick passes but it is far from being stale passing for the sake of passing and pointless possession that people tend to attribute with Tiki-Taka. Rather I will join the football hipsters in borrowing the term “Vertical Tiki-Taka” to describe how this tactic plays. Vertical Tiki-Taka is a more aggressive style of possession football where the emphasis is as much on keeping the ball as it on moving it up the pitch as quickly as possible. It is brand of “liquid football” that brought celebrated managers like Pep Guardiola and Maurizio Sarri a lot of success in recent years. But how did I achieve this? It is not because Roma’s squad is better than Fiorentina’s. For the most part, it is not. With the exception of its fullbacks, Fiorentina is technically equivalent. While the Giallorossi are predicted to finish in the top 5, they do not possess a world-class squad and have little depth outside of the first team. Also, I barely changed the team instructions and roles between the two saves. So why is Roma playing so good after only half a season? I believe the answer to that lies in the player’s player traits. Maurizio Sarri’s Vertical Tiki-Taka “Sarriball” at its best As you can see, Vertical Tiki-Taka, as played by Sarri’s Napoli is similar to Pep’s vision of the more dynamic Tiki Taka in how it relies in creating overloads on one side of the field in order to unlock a very attacking player on the opposite wing (in this example, Callejon). So how do PPMs fit into it? With Giallorossi, my overall strategy is shaped by the fact that for most domestic matches I am the favoured side, required to play through dense enemy defenses. In order to win against parked buses I have come to rely on tactical overloads (a concept I covered extensively here) and specific Player Trait combinations. I’m not going to go back and explain the three ways in which I create overloads. With Roma I decided to keep a symmetrical 4-2-3-1 formation while using only two overload methods: specific supporting roles and team instructions to overload our left side. While overload itself is easy enough to achieve, switching the ball to the right “unlocked” flank turned out tricky. Initially, I found that managing a top side like Roma can make it difficult to find space behind the opponent’s defensive low block and score goals. To do this more consistently I crafted my tactic to take advantage of the PPM “Likes to play One-Twos”. Luckily the squad already had a few players with this trait and I started promptly to train all my attackers in it. The video below will give you a good idea how one-two passing helps to “play through” defenders. One-Twos work similarly in the game. Like any Player Preferred Move, they increase the likelihood of an action. In this case, the likelihood that the player will pass short to a teammate before making a forward run into space with the intention of quickly receiving the ball back.One-two passing works especially well in a short-passing possession tactic. It can help your team to use short passes and superior off the ball movement to play through stubborn opposition. So where the more direct diagonal passes and crosses are blocked, high-speed running and passing is harder for defenders to contain. It you have a team full of good passers and attackers with above average (15+) off the ball and decision-making , then one-twos become an essential compliment to playing possessive football. Breaking the Bus with Roma I am going to argue further that when facing a parked bus, possession football is exactly what you need to play, and not a more direct attacking approach. Many FM players also make the mistake of sitting back and hoping that the opponent will come forward more and expose gaps behind their defense. While this might work as a counter-attacking strategy when you are the underdog, when you play as the favoured side it only gives the defensive opponent more time on the ball. In the game this translates to instances of very high possession for the defending side who sit back and the hog the ball while hoping for a draw. Early on in my FM career the amount of boring draws I would get infuriated me. Its one of the reasons I started playing around with overloads and other ways to break the bus. After hours of experimenting with various teams, I found that the best way to break down a low defensive block is to keep possession and dictate how the game should go. When you maintain high possession while overloading one side, it allows your central forwards and/or wingers to get more involved in the play. It keeps your attack tight and spaced close for short passes so even if there is little room behind the opponent’s defensive wall, you can break through it via a series of short passes and runs into space. A video example from my save is probably the best way to show how this works. In the clip above notice how initially we overload the left side before advancing rapidly up the field via short passes and off the ball runs. I can count at least three one-twos in the final third. What you cannot tell from the clip is that Cagliari was a very stubborn side playing exemplary negative football for the whole 90 minutes. So when it finally came, this beautiful goal, by none other than my golden boy Nicolo Zaniolo, arrived in the last minutes of extra time. Better late than neve. Our patience paid off with the goal allowing Roma to advance to the next stage of the Italian Cup. To create more one-two passing between them, I have my two inside forwards play as close to the shadow striker as possible. It helps if they have “Cut inside” trait. By staying close to the center it should allow the inside forwards exchange one two passes more frequently with the shadow striker or even my deeplying forward. Having One Twos trait on the inside forwards is probably even more important than on the central striker pairing because there is inherently more space on the wings to take advantage of this PPM. Also having overlapping fullback and wingback with the same trait provides another passing avenue to our attack. My 4-2-3-1 Tactical Primer – The core selection of PPMs that allow my Roma team to play their own brand of “liquid” attacking short pass football – “Vertical Tiki-Taka”. The image above is my easy-to-use visual guide on how I mold my team into playing an attractive brand of possession football. The 4-2-3-1 is a perfect formation for it, and I had a lot of success with it. That is provided you have capable players with the right PPMs. As you can see in the picture, I’m in the process of defining the core PPM selection for the roles in my tactic. The ones listed above are by no means exhaustive as there are other traits that can work. However I believe these ones are essential to how my 4-2-3-1 functions. They enhance my tactic and help it to work well with fewer instructions. I chose Roma for my test as their team already has at least one player in each position with one or more of the required preferred traits. The rest I can train. Essentially, I ask all my wingers, and shadow striker to play one twos and move into channels while the central striker absolutely needs to have “comes deep to get the ball” in addition to playing one twos. With adequate training most of my team should possess these traits by the end of 1st season. I will be bringing other suitable candidates via transfers. You can see the team instructions I use but keep in mind that the tactic is still a work in progress. Although feel free to try it out for yourself as I include the download link at the end of the article. In future entries, I plan to go in more detail on how I set up 4-2-3-1 formation as well as how we performed in the 1st full season in Serie A (SPOILER – We did quite well!). 1st Season so far – with handfull of games left, we are first but in a tight race with both Juventus and Napoli. Who will come out on top? Nicolo Zaniolo – Future Imperator of Roma Nicolo is one of several 5 star-rated wonderkids available to Roma. The others include Luca Pellegrini, Alessio Riccardi and Justin Kluivert have the potential to develop into wordbeaters Nicolo Zaniolo has been responding to my training especially well. After six months, as my primary shadow striker he already learned to play one twos and possesses a veritable arsenal of other traits that make him excel in the role. He is currently my top goalscorer (with 14 goals, not bad for a 19 year old rooky in his first competitive season!) and as you can see attribute-wise he is shaping up into one of my most potent offensive weapons. AveNico! Zaniolo is my ideal Shadow Striker – physically and mentally strong with enough tactical intelligence to anticipate, get into position off the ball, and technical enough to finish his chances. Having that Power Shot trait helps too, although he scores most of his goals from within the penatly area (he is especially good with headers). I’m truly excited for what he will bring to my 4-2-3-1 tactic as I chronicle his rise (as well as Rome’s 2nd conquest of Europe) in my future articles. Thanks for reading and hopefully you will continue to follow my new Roma-inspired guide series titled Running with the Wolves! Tactic Download: https://ufile.io/xnwyx9ef Follow us @ Dictate The Game’s Facebook and Dictate The Game’s Twitter
  3. It is said a picture is worth more than 1000 words, so here it goes and see what we can make of it: From the 20 teams found in Seria in the 2018-2019 edition, 18 of them come from the North (west and east) and Center regions. Only 2 of them are coming from the Islands (Cagliari) and South region (Napoli). They are also the only one to ever won any major trophies of the Italian calcio (football). A lot of discussion can be made around what drives this discrepancy between the north and the south, but this is not the purpose here. Furthermore, I am not Italian and therefore not a lot of information for me on the topic. What we aim to do is pick over a club in the south, and climb to Serie A, eventually winning some trophies along the way. It is clear by now that I have decided on going to the region of Calabria. And that Is important because I aim to do all that only using players from Calabria (there are several careers here exploring the concept in other regions of Europe, most of them in Brittany, but also done it myself in the national Romanian forum by only using players born in cross-border region - Banat). It would be a difficult task as I've played around with some filters and there not a great deal of exceptional players from Calabria, but that will only add to the challenge. I have yet to pick a club, but playing on Football Manager Touch I am bound by the clubs playing in the out-of-the-box leagues (although would have made a beautiful story to start from Serie D or even lower, but afraid real-life won't let me do that much time-investment anymore). Therefore I am still to decide between one of the following: Crotone (Serie B) - recently relegated from Serie A, but not doing great irl, good facilities, decent stadium, a bit to many loaned players. Cosenza (Serie B) - promoted to Serie B, large stadium and decent facilities, the color scheme is a bit off-putting. Catanzaro (Serie C) - lingering for years in the lower leagues after Serie A 30 years a go, medium sized in all aspects. Reggina (Serie C) - largest city of the region, a large stadium and good facilities, been to Serie A before. Rende (Serie C) - not sure I wanna go that low as both the club and the city (an annex of Cosenza) are on the smaller size. Vibonese (Serie C) - another smaller club which never been to Serie A. Most of the clubs suffered a process characteristic to Italy (and especially the south) due to financial troubles and irregularities they have been re-founded several times, but that won't be big problem. Chosing one of them will be as searching for the perfect balance between to hard and to easy (although I doubt it will be the case, never had much success in the big leagues in FM with small teams). Might even put in one or two funnier criteria, like for which team I can buy online a game shirt (will help me stick with it), or which will be most suitable as a tourist destination for me and the miss this summer. Any suggestions are welcomed, as for sure gonna take a couple of days to decide (introducing all criteria in a excel database, giving them weights, calculating).
  4. Hi everyone, this is a series from my blog, hope you enjoy it The Fantasista: Intelligence, Creativity, Technique - Part One What is perhaps one of the most fascinating aspects of football culture is the different interpretations of player roles and playing styles that various nations bring on to the wider football scene. The global football discourse often involves specific, almost trademark terms like the 'Volante' in Brasil - a term that has its roots in the name of Argentine player Carlos Volante, who was one of the first to play the position during the 1930s. It literally translates into English as Flywheel – a rotating device used as an energy store – or steering wheel. They are very much the fulcrum of attacks and the engine room of defence, and will use their technical ability to engineer attacks whilst also being able to garner the energy to break up opposition moves. Then you have roles like the 'Raumdeuter' in Germany, based on Thomas Muller's style of play at Bayern Munchen - a term that means 'space investigator' when translated literally and provides a good account of the style of play it often employs. When it comes to Italy, however, someone accustomed to the English football terminology would probably need a dictionary to make sense of pretty much anything they're talking about. Italian football culture is deep-rooted in history and has often been described as the nation that focuses most on the tactical side of the game. The trouble is, there are different words for similar things, however....not quite similar. For example, a 'mezz'ala' would be regarded as the equivalent of the 'box-to-box' midfielder in the UK, however that isn't necessarily true: the mezz'ala role entails more horizontal movement rather than vertical, box-to-box coverage, and its' literal translation actually means 'half-wing', which relates to the player operating in the 'half-spaces' and covering the wings (mostly relevant in 3-man midfield systems, such as the 4-3-3 or 5-3-2). This is of great importance when trying to make sense of specific football terminology. As mentioned above, a lot of these 'trademark' roles entail definitions of specific players and how they interpret the roles, as well as the context of the football culture they are part of. Along with the 'regista', One of the Italian terms that gained a wider recognition in world football as well as in English football culture is... 'the trequartista'. Literally translated as 'three quarters player', the term refers to where the player would likely play on the pitch As Roberto Mancini points out in his Master's Thesis that is based solely on analyzing the trequartista, "The magic of the number 10 comes from the trequartista's feet, the player of inventiveness, the one who is capable of wrong-footing “everyone with a piece of skill perhaps he is not even fully aware of.” He also breaks down his definition of the 'trequartista' into two aspects, which highlight the importance of football culture and the context it creates: From the point of view of “football culture”: The trequartista is a player with great technical skills and specific characteristics: sublime unmarking qualities; great basic technical skills and good applied technique quality; unpredictability; ability to serve the strikers with ease in various ways; predisposition to dribble and individual play; poor attitude to the defensive phase. From the point of view of the “position on the field”: The trequartista is a player who places himself in the central zone between the defensive midfielders and the strikers' lines. His analysis covers a lot of aspects about this role, and I strongly recommend giving it a read here - Roberto Mancini Master Thesis. Perhaps the most relevant part of his research to the objective of this article however, is his observations on how the 'trequartistas' of Serie A (in year 2000) show very different styles of play, and how much of it is down to the player's particular characteristics and how he interprets the role. For example, you'd have a player like Juan Sebastian Veron, who drives forward from the deeper area of the pitch, or someone like Locatelli (Bologna 2000) who mainly drifts laterally behind the strikers. The tactical set-up, the player's personal style of play and his general characteristics can result in a variety of interpretations of what is a 'trequartista'. In fact, so different where the styles of football that different trequartistas employed, that a new term was coined out in order to refer to a particular type of player that derives from the more traditional interpretation of a trequartista: The Fantasista, as the name itself suggests, is a role that implies artistry with and without the ball. Sparks of magic that vow the crowds, an imaginative ability to think about football and the technical ability required to execute it. The fantasista has traditionally been the main star of the show when it comes to exciting, creative pieces of play. Some of the names that made the role famous are undoubtedly - Roberto Baggio(pictured above), Diego Maradona, Francesco Totti, Alessandro Del Piero, amongst many others. Just to illustrate how mind-twisting Italian football terminology can be, I will quote the author of this fantastic piece. "Fantasista is usually or mostly a trequartista, but trequartista is not always a fantasista. Simone Perrotta, Thiago Motta, are one of the players who have been put as a trequartista but not fantasista. They interpret trequartista as hard working attacking midfielder who spread the pass and shoot at the goal when the opportunity knocks out. In Italy, fantasista is being described as the one who wears no 10, in which every little italian kids dream to wear no 10." What differentiates him from the traditional trequartista is a combination of: a) tactical intelligence - the ability to read the game, position himself favourably, make decisions that unlock stale pieces of play, trick the opposition, anticipate the opponent's collective/individual moves b)imagination/creativity - the 'fantasy' brain that comes up with pieces of skill or finds unconventional solutions to complicated situations of the pitch c) technical ability - the ability to execute the combination of the above two points with the feet: ball control, dribbling, technique, first touch and so on. Roberto Baggio is truly one of the first players that helped bring even more weight to what a 'fantasista' means: In a nutshell, we are talking about a football player with complete abilities in the attacking/creative department of the game. With less focus on physique and with limited defensive responsibility, the fantasista conserves his energy and focus on creating play in the final third, or more appropriately... in the third quarter. Unlike the trequartista, however, he will look to get involved even more in the box and be there to apply the final finish or curl the ball into the top corner, as a certain man did on numerous occasions only to get that finish trademarked as the shot 'a la Del Piero'. In the next parts of this series I will look at how this role can be translated into Football Manager and how different players or tactical systems can result in interpreting it differently.
  5. First of all hello to you all, been here for a while now but dont think i've given a proper introduction before, although I dont like to write too much so I'll get right into the topic I'm a huge football and Inter Milan fan playing FM/early cm's fan for around 15 years now. Each game I've had some up and downs, but what every version had in common for me was that I had to have a successful Inter. FM18 is no different, however since Inter this season seams like they can finally make an impact and they actually play with some clear ideas in mind I thought I should try to replicate Spalletti's ideas into the game... Before I get into details I'd like to mention that my understanding of the ME and the tactical side of things is still a little unclear for me so If what I say is completely nonsense please don't hesitate to correct me Inter Characteristics Having watched every single Inter's game this season I think I know how they play and I can more or less agree with these screenshots: Pretty much self-explanatory really, Inter uses a high press (low/medium defensive block) 4231 shape most of the games using this lineup: Handanovic - D'Ambrosio Skriniar Miranda Nagatomo - Gagliardini Vecino - Candreva Valero Perisic - Icardi. Inter also plays short passing, possession football stretching the play out wide, on the right D'Ambrosio tends to play high up overlapping Candreva who plays really wide being that typical winger type, crossing a lot, while on the other side Nagatomo/Dalbert/Santon also happen to overlap Perisic but most of the time they are supporting the Croatian who uses his pace and dribbling to get himself into shooting/crossing position. Up front there's the typical number 9, Icardi who already scored 15 goals this season while Perisic only has 4 and Brozovic 3, so it's safe to say Icardi is the main threat As I've mentioned above, Inter mostly uses flanks to create their attacks Most if not all Icardi's goals came from the inside of the penalty box by either a cross or a through ball I have found 2 tactical analysis of Inter this season: http://outsideoftheboot.com/2017/08/30/tactical-analysis-roma-1-3-inter/ http://outsideoftheboot.com/2017/10/23/tactical-analysis-napoli-0-0-inter-milan/ While these 2 articles provide some proof and examples of how Inter played, apart from the pressing analysis, I will not really address it here since the 2 away games were against Roma and Napoli, so an altered gameplan was needed to neutralize the threat, and that was completely different to what I want to achieve here, perhaps I can use them later to create an away tactics for my save The Shape and Player Roles and Player Instructions The Main Idea is to play from the back using short passes to the wide players, then either go for a bit more risky pass to the wingers or safer option to the middle of the pitch and switching the side slowly making the way up the field, then provide either a cross or a through ball to Icardi, or an overlap on one of the sides to shoot or cross I will be using the classic 4231 wide shape since this is the closest to what Inter plays irl as well as it almost has all the required roles for the system. Handanovic - G De - an amazing keeper but lacking the sweeper skills like Neuer so he tends to play 'safe' which is why I went for the default role with Distribute to full backs Distribute Quickly and Fewer Risky Passes D'Ambrosio - WB At - better defensively than offensively,overlapping Candreva and providing crosses, rarely cutting in. Went for the WB as the FB seemed to deep, might even try CWB Stay Wider Skriniar - BPD De - when he was bought in the summer from Sampdoria nobody expected much from him, but he quickly showed how much of a tank he is with some ball skills as well. Spalletti likes to have at least one of his CBs to be skilled with the ball, in Roma he had Rudiger BPD and Manolas CB partnership. None Miranda - CD De - solid player most of the time, though the older he gets the more mistakes he makes, and although he works great with Skriniar, he has been in his shadow since the young Slovakian joined our side None Dalbert/Nagatomo - WB Su - solid supporting defender most of the time staying wide and supporting Perisic, rarely overlapping or cutting in Stay wider, run wide with the ball Gagliardini - DLP De - Had the biggest problem finding the right role for the 2 CMs, because it seems like most of the time they both act like BBMs, however when I tried it I was too vulnerable for counters, which is why i changed Roberto to be a DLP D as that role has what I think the most similar movement to the real life, though will be testing this more. Just realized that in many recent Real life matches he tends to be decent at getting the ball back but also his passing is lacking accuracy which is why I am considering a BWM De/Su role for him will try in the next game Dribble less Vecino - BBM Su - Spalletti uses his CMs as very mobile all around midfielders who are runners, are comfortable with the ball, can pass the ball and shoot, Vecino is the perfect example of this More risky passing, Dribble less Candreva - W Su - Him and Perisic provide the most assists and although they sometimes switch sides they both act differently, Candreva's main task is to hug the sideline and cross, although he is very irritating at times spamming crosses at every opportunity, it would be unfair to say he hasnt had an impact, the assists prove the fact that he is vital to Spalletti's side. Has a great shot, can dribble, use both feet, and is a workhorse in defence. I've picked Supportive Winger as he already likes to cut in on his own and shoot with power. Close down more, Get Further Forward, Roam from position, More direct passes, More risky passes, Mark specific position D (L) Valero/J.Mario - AM Su- the brain of the team although lacks shooting and tires out by the 70th minute, untill then he presses a lot and is always available for a pass, although he has only 1 goal and 0 assists this season he has many key passes and is always available for a pass as he likes to drop deeper. He already has Moves into channels, plays 1-2s, dictates temto and tries killer balls. Close down more, Get Further Forward, Roam from position, More direct passes, More risky passes Perisic - IF At - seems to be struggling recently to get to his best form he showed us last season, but still shows us glimpses of his magic, he's really fast, dribbles well, crosses as well is a defensive workhorse and a scoring threat netted 4 goals this season and providing 6 assists. Close down more, Get further forward, Roam from position, More direct passes, More risky passes, Mark specific position D (R) Icardi - AF At - this role seems to suit him perfectly as he isnt the type of player like lewandowski or suarez, a typical number 9, main man to score goals, I've noticed that Spalletti sometimes requires him to drop deeper and play more like a DLF or a CF, I will try the AF first. Already has Moves into channels, Places shots and Tries to beat offside trap and I've added Close down more Team instructions I've picked Very fluid because before Spalletti Inter lacked team spirit and unity, now the italian coach made it a priority to gel the team to play as a unit and have all players contributing to all phases. I went for Standard mentality and Normal Tempo due to the fact that I think Control would be a bit too much of a safe approach, Inter doesnt play tiki taka, they do play slowly from the back, but when they get to the final 3rd they try to play quicker and more direct towards Icardi, hence more risky direct passing for the front Cam and the wings Wide width I've already explained before Decided to go for the middle ground regarding the Defensive Line as they sometimes play deeper and sometimes higher, so Normal will be my starting point with Offside trap to compress the space given to the opposition team I've chosen Closing Down Sometimes and Prevent Short GK distribution because most of the time they press opposition backline and the keeper using the front 4, I have also added Opposition instructions to the back 4 + GK Press Always Tackle Harder Force weaker foot Exploit flanks Play out Of defence and shorter passing I've covered earlier I've added Be More Expressive in hopes that the creative CAM and wingers will get some more freedom Pass into the box Guess its an obvious choice when having Icardi up top Dribble less most of the players are OK with the dribble though I dont really want them to risk loosing the ball on our own half which is why I've added Dribble less TI but added Dribble more to Cam and the wings Ideally I'd like to use the 4231 at all times but I guess its hardly possible (OR ISN'T IT?) in this game by simply micromanaging to counter everything the opposition is throwing at us. I also converted this to a 41221DM version that uses safer approach to control the game against lesser team who park the bus One of the recent games in the season against Genoa key passes CURRENT ISSUES: My main current issue is that I keep having many shots e.g. 18 but only 5 on target despite the fact that most my players have shoot less PI.. do you guys have any ideas how could I counter this? I think this is pretty much it, I will post some updates half way through the season and at the end Thanks! Please let me know your opinion!
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