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I’ve been playing CM/ FM over 20 years. I still haven’t really got closing down and marking 😂

if I’m playing a low press with a view to counter and the opponent is Aston Villa with Grealish at CM. If I opt to press him always does that override the low block press so he’ll be closed down even in his own box for example ? If I tightly mark him does that mean he’s tightly marked wherever he is? 

on marking should I have to always tightly mark or close down opposing CFs? I mean I expect my defence to have enough brains to tightly mark anyone inside our own box! And yes I know one shouldn’t tightly mark a speed demon. But surely stopping strikers from shooting is a given?

so if I tightly mark or press an opposition CF does that mean My team will do that all over the pitch? Which is clearly unnecessary.

I find the whole pressing line versus individual instructions a bit confusing tbh.

 

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1 hour ago, steam just is said:

I’ve been playing CM/ FM over 20 years. I still haven’t really got closing down and marking 😂

if I’m playing a low press with a view to counter and the opponent is Aston Villa with Grealish at CM. If I opt to press him always does that override the low block press so he’ll be closed down even in his own box for example ? If I tightly mark him does that mean he’s tightly marked wherever he is? 

on marking should I have to always tightly mark or close down opposing CFs? I mean I expect my defence to have enough brains to tightly mark anyone inside our own box! And yes I know one shouldn’t tightly mark a speed demon. But surely stopping strikers from shooting is a given?

so if I tightly mark or press an opposition CF does that mean My team will do that all over the pitch? Which is clearly unnecessary.

I find the whole pressing line versus individual instructions a bit confusing tbh.

 

I think youre going a bit extreme with this.

If you "tightly mark" someone, then your players are going to be more likely to engage with him when hes on the ball. Thus could be a good thing, but it might not be.

If you tell a certain player to "man mark" him, in defensive situations he is going to try and follow him. In your example, would a centre midfielder run all the way to the opposition box just to mark an opposition player? probably not. But would Grealish run all the way back towards his own box either? also probably not.

Tightly marking a centre forward could be disastrous....You say you "expect" your defence to do that. You could end up in some weird 2 v 2 situations and be wide open doing that.

You just need to watch the matches and adapt to what you see on the field.

The lines are probably about as simple a way of explaining compactness really. The line of engagement signifies how high up the field you want your players to start winning the ball back. A team like Liverpool, or even a Hassenhuttl style Southampton will try and do this high. If youve watched Everton recently, its much deeper with the aim of staying compact.

The defensive line is how much space the defence are willing to leave behind them. If youve got a higher line of defence youre most likely trying to compress the opposition with a high pressing strategy, probably using an offside trap, and using your defenders in the buildup of your own attacks.

If you set your defensive line lower, you are looking to restrict space behind your defence. To make the opposition "play in front of you" so your defence doesnt get turned.

Edited by FMunderachiever
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1 hour ago, FMunderachiever said:

I think youre going a bit extreme with this.

If you "tightly mark" someone, then your players are going to be more likely to engage with him when hes on the ball. Thus could be a good thing, but it might not be.

If you tell a certain player to "man mark" him, in defensive situations he is going to try and follow him. In your example, would a centre midfielder run all the way to the opposition box just to mark an opposition player? probably not. But would Grealish run all the way back towards his own box either? also probably not.

Tightly marking a centre forward could be disastrous....You say you "expect" your defence to do that. You could end up in some weird 2 v 2 situations and be wide open doing that.

You just need to watch the matches and adapt to what you see on the field.

The lines are probably about as simple a way of explaining compactness really. The line of engagement signifies how high up the field you want your players to start winning the ball back. A team like Liverpool, or even a Hassenhuttl style Southampton will try and do this high. If youve watched Everton recently, its much deeper with the aim of staying compact.

The defensive line is how much space the defence are willing to leave behind them. If youve got a higher line of defence youre most likely trying to compress the opposition with a high pressing strategy, probably using an offside trap, and using your defenders in the buildup of your own attacks.

If you set your defensive line lower, you are looking to restrict space behind your defence. To make the opposition "play in front of you" so your defence doesnt get turned.

Tightly marking a centre forward could be disastrous....You say you "expect" your defence to do that. You could end up in some weird 2 v 2 situations and be wide open doing that.

Appreciate your reply. To the point above. If aguero is in my penalty area I want him tightly marked surely. Otherwise he’s free. Less time on the ball means less time to think and place a shot. However if he is 5 yards in my half I don’t want him tightly marked and drawing people out of position. So the instructions are too rigid no?

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51 minutes ago, steam just is said:

Tightly marking a centre forward could be disastrous....You say you "expect" your defence to do that. You could end up in some weird 2 v 2 situations and be wide open doing that.

Appreciate your reply. To the point above. If aguero is in my penalty area I want him tightly marked surely. Otherwise he’s free. Less time on the ball means less time to think and place a shot. However if he is 5 yards in my half I don’t want him tightly marked and drawing people out of position. So the instructions are too rigid no?

I absolutely appreciate what youre saying.

I think you just need to watch the matches and make decisions based on this, there are no absolutes on the game.

If you put "tight marking" on him, it might sucker defenders onto him and leave gaps elsewhere.

There really isnt a "you should do this" type answer.

If i had Bonucci and Chiellini as my two centrebacks, i might expect to see more marking behaviour from them than say, defenders where i want one to attack the ball and one to mop up on cover.

Maybe id want my defenders to position themselves to block the ball rather than mark him, or maybe they have good positioning sense and can intercept the ball.

Its very hard to answer.

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Adding to discussion if I ever have to man mark someone I'd rather use marking certain position in player instructions rather than marking certain players. It's because AI likes to shuffle around players from time to time. You can often see him changing players within formation, like switching sides for wingers or even shuffle midfielders. If it's in midfield than it's not that bad with marking certain player but you don't want for example your wingback to follow his target to the other side of the pitch leaving his side completely unprotected and that's what can happen if you set him tight marking player of your choice.

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Appreciate the answers and I’m getting what you saying @FMunderachiever. Maybe a development area would be an option on where and when to press specially (for individual players).

I deliberately ticked the never close down box in tactics on a full,back who has 3/20 crossing skills. Within 1 min he’d curled in a peach of a cross and we were 1-0. So I’m never clicking that option again.

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