Jump to content

Round of 16: Uruguay vs Portugal


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 341
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

1 minute ago, craigcwwe said:

He's basically Portugal's version of Eric Dier. Both are pretty slow and cumbersome, quite slow with the ball too.

Nah way better on the ball than Dier.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Baptista_8 said:

I really like him on the ball, but not seen much of him outside Euro 2016 and this WC. Definitely improved Portugal's midfield since the days of Miguel Veloso.

Idk what are his instructions, but he's just passing it to the next guy and always has an extra touch. They need to speed things up if they want to do anything in this game.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Baptista_8 said:

@PMLF will correct you ;)

 

3 minutes ago, Heartwork said:

I just think it's funny how he's referred to only by his first and middle names. It's not even like a nickname e.g. with Nani or Ronaldinho.

Yes, if he was referred to the same way as English players, he would be known as Cristiano Aveiro.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Baptista_8 said:

Nah way better on the ball than Dier.

Always seems to play it safe whenever I watch him, Dier at least tries a forward pass. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, PMLF said:

 

Yes, if he was referred to the same way as English players, he would be known as Cristiano Aveiro.

Or Cristiano dos Santos? Don't Portuguese and Spanish people generally choose which of their surnames (one from their mother, one from their father) to go for?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Heartwork said:

Or Cristiano dos Santos? Don't Portuguese and Spanish people generally choose which of their surnames (one from their mother, one from their father) to go for?

In Portuguese it's mother's surname first followed by the father's surname. In Spanish it's the other way around.

Choosing can happen sometimes but it's not the usual or traditional way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, PMLF said:

 

Yes, if he was referred to the same way as English players, he would be known as Cristiano Aveiro.

TIL I have a similar surname to Cristiano. :cool:

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, PMLF said:

 

Yes, if he was referred to the same way as English players, he would be known as Cristiano Aveiro.

 

That doesn't sound bad actually :thup: 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, PMLF said:

In Portuguese it's mother's surname first followed by the father's surname. In Spanish it's the other way around.

Choosing can happen sometimes but it's not the usual or traditional way.

OK cos I sometimes get confused when I see one Spanish player using their first surname and another using their second surname and wasn't sure if that applied in Portuguese surnames too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Heartwork said:

OK cos I sometimes get confused when I see one Spanish player using their first surname and another using their second surname and wasn't sure if that applied in Portuguese surnames too. 

In Portugal you can choose whatever combination you want, first name, last name, middle name, nickname, whatever. No one cares.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Heartwork said:

I just think it's funny how he's referred to only by his first and middle names. It's not even like a nickname e.g. with Nani or Ronaldinho.

Roberto Carlos also used his first two names, amongst many others.

I'd genuinely be interested to know why - when the original Ronaldo was at or near his peak - CR used both his names instead of picking a surname or even just calling himself Cristiano. Was there another top-level Brazilian or Portuguese player just named Cristiano in the early 2000s?

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Heartwork said:

OK cos I sometimes get confused when I see one Spanish player using their first surname and another using their second surname and wasn't sure if that applied in Portuguese surnames too.

When it comes to football they may do it due to a name sounding better, etc, or because they were raised only by their mother, etc

But for example if Luis Suárez was born in Brazil, his full name would normally be Luis Alberto Díaz Suárez instead of Luis Alberto Suárez Díaz like it is in Spanish.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, The Rebel MC said:

Whilst I can't stand Ronaldo I do very much respect and appreciate him...however when he pulls his shorts up on a free kick he does remind me of what a full grown man would look like in a baby grow...and that just diminishes any style the guy thinks he might have :D

pOtYKV4.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, FaceCrusher said:

In Portugal you can choose whatever combination you want, first name, last name, middle name, nickname, whatever. No one cares.

I suppose unusual or non traditional combinations are rare in practice though. I mean regarding official names, not artistic/footballing names.

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, PMLF said:

 

Yes, if he was referred to the same way as English players, he would be known as Cristiano Aveiro.

Why is he referred to as Cristiano Ronaldo (even in Portugal) then...just the way he's known?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, FaceCrusher said:

In Portugal you can choose whatever combination you want, first name, last name, middle name, nickname, whatever. No one cares.

Ahhh. This explains it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, PMLF said:

I suppose unusual or non traditional combinations are rare in practice though. I mean regarding official names, not artistic/footballing names. 

It's not rare at all. Even guys like famous politicians use different combinations. Some go first name + last name, other only by the two surnames, etc etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Baptista_8 said:

Why is he referred to as Cristiano Ronaldo (even in Portugal) then...just the way he's known?

It's just sort like an artistic name, but I have no idea why chose it, maybe he wanted to include Ronaldo due to other great players having that name.

1 minute ago, FaceCrusher said:

It's not rare at all. Even guys like famous politicians use different combinations. Some go first name + last name, other only by the two surnames, etc etc.

In Brazil this is still relatively rare, although people of recent immigrant origin, or more isolated populations, or members of certain minorities (like Jews for instance) have sometimes just one surname.

I for instance have two personal names and two surnames.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice useless 'omens' fact from the ITV commentator there.

"The last time Uruguay won their first 4 games, they won the whole thing. That was in 1930."

Guess how many games Uruguay played in the 1930 World Cup...

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, PMLF said:

It's just sort like an artistic name, but I have no idea why chose it, maybe he wanted to include Ronaldo due to other great players having that name.

 

I thought that was his genuinely his second personal name, after Ronald Reagan.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a friend who was Brazilian-British, he used the surname da Silva which was his mother's surname. Don't remember what his father's surname was but it was Scottish sounding. But that brings me to another question: Considering Portuguese people have two surnames, which ones to they pass down to their kids? Would Cristiano's kid take the dos Santos or the Aveiro?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Heartwork said:

I had a friend who was Brazilian-British, he used the surname da Silva which was his mother's surname. Don't remember what his father's surname was but it was Scottish sounding. But that brings me to another question: Considering Portuguese people have two surnames, which ones to they pass down to their kids? Would Cristiano's kid take the dos Santos or the Aveiro?

In Brazil it would normally be the father's surname, but of course in theory he can pass whatever he wants, but the normal way is passing the father's surname.

1-1, Pepe.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, PMLF said:

In Brazil it would normally be the father's surname, but of course in theory he can pass whatever he wants, but the normal way is passing the father's surname.

1-1, Pepe.

So it'd be dos Santos?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...