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SA08 Training Schedules - Packed Download Version


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Packed FM2008 training schedules @ filefront

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Notes:

The 75 training schedules have now been packed into 3 categories: full-time, part-time and youth. This means that you can now import a full category in one go, and therefore save plenty of time! The original download was unpacked, which resulted in countless time wasted on importing each training schedule one-by-one after download. Installation instructions and notes included with the download. My thanks to Support Monkey on this one icon14.gif

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seasoned alcoholic- I know this is an age old question but if you have a player who's a mc but you want to play him as an attacking midfielder, do you train him in his natural position or the position that you want him to play. Thanks

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Do you want to retrain him to be an AM C or will this remove his M C position? This happens once you've retrained the second time, as they lose the original position.

It depends tbh. For example, in my Villa game I have Barry who plays centrally as M C (or M LC to be spot on). I rotate his training between CM Skills 2 and AM Skills 2. I could use the DM Skills 2, but I use an exclusive holding DM C, so this is irrelevant. This way, you can combine the best of both training areas with minimal compromise.

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Season Alcoholic, these look like awesome schedules. Quick question though, which schedule should each player be on. For instance there is GK and GK2, is one of these superior than the other or is it simply for each manager to decide what priorities are?

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Originally posted by Tomaldinho:

Season Alcoholic, these look like awesome schedules. Quick question though, which schedule should each player be on. For instance there is GK and GK2, is one of these superior than the other or is it simply for each manager to decide what priorities are?

Cheers icon14.gif

Generally you can say that the numbered schedules (EGs: GK 2, FB Tactics 2, W Skills 2, CF Shooting 3 etc etc) are biased towards more technically gifted players, whereas the non-numbered ones are more physically biased. For example, you may find the more physically biased schedules useful in the lower leagues where generally the quality of play is poorer than that of superior divisions. However, this is not strictly advised - look at what abilities each player has, his potential (from coach reports), his playing positions (natural and non-natural), and then decide a schedule which is the closest fit to that type of player.

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Originally posted by mikmikmik:

i am lookin for the download pack, can anybody send it to me because my connection only allow me to download from filefront.com but that link aint working anymore. any kind souls? icon_biggrin.gif

Check it again - worked fine for me this morning.

I like this icon14.gif

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some of these work a lot better than others

for example i'm using 2 for each position (ie GK 2)

my DMs FBs and GKs have all improved massively but my AMs have had hardly any stats improve throughout the seasons

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i really want to know more about the difference in the training scheme's as i see 2 of each for each postion wich confuses me.
Generally you can say that the numbered schedules (EGs: GK 2, FB Tactics 2, W Skills 2, CF Shooting 3 etc etc) are biased towards more technically gifted players, whereas the non-numbered ones are more physically biased. For example, you may find the more physically biased schedules useful in the lower leagues where generally the quality of play is poorer than that of superior divisions. However, this is not strictly advised - look at what abilities each player has, his potential (from coach reports), his playing positions (natural and non-natural), and then decide a schedule which is the closest fit to that type of player.

..........

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Analysis of position-based training schedules

In order to design and build training schedules based upon playing positions, we must look at the features of each position; basically what key activities are involved. Here are some rough illustrations:-

Goalkeepers

  • Physical: keepers are generally heavier than outfield players, mainly because many goalkeepers are taller than the outfield, but this is not always the case. Smaller goalkeepers may be more agile due to their lighter weight and lower centre of gravity, and may therefore pull-off more acrobatic and reflex saves. A taller keeper may have the natural advantage of defending the goal as he has a greater reach span, but due to weight issues may not be able to get down quickly to make a directional save; it all depends on reflexes and agility rather than pace and stamina in this case (although acceleration is required to enable a keeper to come off his line and win the ball in a one-on-one for example). Also, jumping is an important part of any goalkeeper’s game, as he will need to rise above defenders and collect the ball cleanly, or if under pressure, to parry it away to safety.
  • Mental: this is crucial to the keeper’s place in the side; he needs to be able to concentrate during the match, and then from here decide what action is required dependent upon the circumstance. The decision will ultimately affect the goalkeeper’s positioning – they need to continually know where the goal is in relation to them so they can adjust accordingly. Reading the game is important for a goalkeeper; should he move out and clear the ball in a one-on-one, catch or punch, kick or throw, save using hands or legs?
  • Technical: this needs to be tied-in with the other two areas. For example, a goalkeeper makes a decision to save the ball, and this is influenced by his physical condition and technical abilities. Eccentricity can ultimately affect the scoreline of a match; if a keeper decides to attempt the incredible, but gets it totally wrong, the opposition may take advantage. However, eccentricity can also influence a player’s technical ability in the way he makes a diving save toward the top corner for example – if he didn’t have the eccentricity to attempt the save then it wouldn’t have happened in the first place. So you can see how eccentricity can be positive and negative.

Fullbacks

  • Physical: having the energy to cover extensive distances of the pitch, such as down the channels, down the wings towards the byline, tracking back, filling in for teammates when attacking from set piece situations, continuous closing down when not in possession. Stamina, acceleration and pace are required in order to deal with or create situations that occur during a match. The ability to move off the mark quickly and close the opposing player down (with the ball) is necessary to reduce the opposition's chances of creating a move. Likewise, having the pace to move away from markers and move into positions off the ball and into space in order to start a possible move is required.
  • Mental: fullbacks need to be able to position themselves where they are required during a match. As they form part of the backline, if they are caught out of position by an opposing winger (or player in a free role) then they are putting more pressure upon the centrehalves to deal with the situation. This will force the centrehalve(s) into making a decision - close the opponent down, or stay with the player they are marking. Marking will be determined by the nature of the tactics; are fullbacks encouraged to get forward and support attacks with greater freedom, or to stay in a solid backline formation with greater emphasis on marking and closing-down?
  • Set pieces: first thing that comes to mind are throw-ins. Also think about corners and whether sufficient cover is available to deal with the opposition striker who has been left up front - possibly set a DM to 'back if needed'? Another one is putting fullbacks on each goalpost when defending against set pieces. Crossing may be required if the fullback gets into a position where he can cross the ball into the area.

Wingbacks

  • Physical: any type of wide player with defensive / offensive responsibilities must have sufficient stamina to cover the likely distances. Depending on tactics, he may be the sole provider of natural width to the team, covering areas slightly higher up the field than a fullback, and getting into positions a winger would frequently move into. Players with poorer stamina are more likely to get caught out of position or make mistakes, and this may prove extremely costly towards the end of a match. Again, acceleration and pace are required to give the speed advantage to the player over his opponents. However, this may be more the case with a wingback, due to the nature of his position; he will be more likely to make attacking runs from all positions out wide than a fullback. Wingbacks are a hybrid of the fullback and winger, and attempt to take the strengths from each – high workrate and teamwork is essential for this role.
  • Technical: greater emphasis on a wingback’s technical ability is required as he will be expected to run for prolonged periods with the ball in order to create or identify an opportunity. For example, dribbling, ball control, first touch, passing, crosses.
  • Mental: a more relaxed mentality should be given to wingbacks in order for them to perform their roles capably. This may include less marking, possibly zonal to allow for greater freedom, individual decision making and anticipation abilities.

Centrehalves

  • Physical: a combination of strength, jumping, stamina, pace and balance. A centrehalf should look to out-muscle an opponent if he lacks pace. Aerial domination is another advantage. Also height can be important regarding aerial ability.
  • Mental: depends on tactics, playing tight marking is ideal if you want to limit creative opposition attacks, and requires good marking, positioning, anticipation, tackling, jumping, heading, pace. However, the most creative players may be able to overcome centrehalves on tight marking. Zonal can be more risky, as it allows the opposition more time and space, with defenders dealing with players that enter their ‘zone’ on the pitch as and when. However, it allows centrehalves to make their own decisions, which they should excel at in order to perform zonal marking.
  • Technical: centrehalves can get away with many technical abilities, although the more they excel in the better. Key ones are tackling, marking, heading. Others can include passing, first touch, technique.
  • Set pieces: centrehalves should always be up to attack corners, as they generally have the best aerial abilities. Same applies for attacking free kicks.

Sweepers

  • Physical: similar to centrehalves / central defenders. Stamina is likely to be a key attribute for this role because of the amount of running a sweeper may have to undertake during a match. Acceleration and pace can be beneficial in order for a sweper to close down opposing attacks.
  • Mental: this is crucial for a sweeping role; not only should a sweper be able to read the game accurately, they should also be sufficiently technical to deal with opposition attacks successfully. Sweepers should also be given a free role in order for them to literally sweep the corridor behind the defence and in front of the goalkeeper of any attacking threat. Although it can place more strain on a backline due to the freedom of the sweeper, as well as having a man playing out of standard position, it can be a highly effective method of breaking opposition attacks down. The sweeper can deal with potential attacking threats that may have been missed / impossible to deal with by teammates, and can be called upon to make accurate defensive decisions. Zonal marking is a must for sweepers due to their required freedom of movement and also the amount of opposition players they may have to deal with in a match.
  • Technical: sweepers can get away with many technical abilities, although the more they excel in the better. Key ones are tackling, marking, heading. Others can include passing, first touch, technique. Passing is more important if a short passing style is utilised; on many occasions the ball needs to be moved around and out of defence in order the play to be transferred to midfield. Losing possession in defence can be costly.
  • Set pieces: sweepers should always be up to attack corners, as they generally have the best aerial abilities. Same applies for attacking free kicks.

Defensive Midfielders

  • Physical: perhaps the most important attribute for a holding player. He will be expected to work hard in the engine room of midfield, protecting the backline and linking up the play at the same time. DM's need to make themselves available in order move the ball forward from defence into midfield, assuming a short / mixed passing style is adopted. Also, if an attack cannot break through the opposition defence, having a holding player behind the players that are in attack (central midfielders, attacking midfielders, wingers, forwards, strikers) will allow them to move the ball back in order for the play to be redirected. Defensive midfield playmakers do exist, as they can look to create moves from deep where there may be more freedom and time on the ball than there is much higher up the pitch.
  • Technical: similar in nature to a centrehalf, such as tackling, marking, positioning, anticipation. However, passing is also important as he will need to retain possession for the team. Holding up the play is another feature that may allow a DM to assist in an attack because it allows other players to get themselves into offensive positions off the ball.
  • Mental: another key area of a DM’s game. They need to be sharp and read the game well in order to make the correct decisions. Man marking may be preferred over zonal marking in order to restrict opposition movement.

Central Midfielders

  • Technical: from this area of the pitch and forwards, the flair and talent should begin. Therefore, ball control, passing, first touch, dribbling, shooting, tackling amongst others should be considered. Midfielders don't just get forward and support the attack, they should also be expected to assist the defence when required, and so therefore it is important that appropriate attributes for tackling, positioning, marking exist.
  • Mental: midfielders may not require as much tactical awareness as defensive or offensive players, but they still require at least some in order to build moves further up the pitch. Off the ball, flair, creativity, decision making, awareness are some that need to be considered. Through balls can carve opposition defences apart if timed to perfection.
  • Physical: lots of running in midfield, so pace and stamina are useful. Agility is also important as players frequently make fluid movements when in control of the ball. Aerial ability is a bonus, but midfielders can get by on superior technical ability. Strength in midfield can be the difference between a midfielder retaining posession for the team and building moves, or losing out to the opposition.

Attacking Midfielders

  • Physical: similar to central midfielders, with the exception that defensive responsibilities are sacrificed.
  • Technical: players in this position tend to be the most technically gifted, and the best can influence games almost single-handedly. All technical attributes should be considered, even set pieces, and ones similar to central midfielders will be useful, although tackling, heading and marking are not essential due to the nature of the position.
  • Mental: as offensive players, attacking midfielders need to be creative and intelligent. The greater the player’s technical ability, the greater amount of creative freedom should be provided in order for these players to influence a game. Flair, creativity, decisions, off the ball, anticipation, concentration, determination. As mentioned, marking and positioning is somewhat irrelevant to attacking midfielders due to the nature of their positions and what is required in the role. Zonal marking may be preferred over man marking in order to allow greater freedom of movement.
  • Physical: acceleration, pace, stamina, agility are beneficial to a technical player, especially if they excel at dribbling.

Wingers

  • Physical: wingers need to excel in stamina, pace, acceleration and agility in order to create chances for the side. The ability to lose a marker, riding tackles, and attempting mazy runs with the ball to the byline before pulling back a cross is what wing play is all about.
  • Technical: as with attacking midfielders, wingers need to have technical ability in order to succeed. Dribbling, technique, first touch, passing, crossing are some of the most important factors.
  • Set pieces: wingers need to be able to cross a ball; otherwise their ability may be wasted if the end product is unsatisfactory. Unless of course they can dribble into the box from out wide, and then either attempt a shot or pick at a teammate with a well-timed pass. Throw-ins, free-kicks, corners are also relevant.
  • Mental: similar to attacking midfielders. Free roles should be considered for wingers and attacking midfielders if they excel in terms of technical capabilities; again their abilities may be wasted if creative players are not directly involved with the game. Running with the ball and attacking runs are something to also consider.

Strikers

  • Physical: dependent upon tactics. For example, a tall, powerful target man; a fast, agile striker; a skilful (dribbling, technique, first touch) centreforward. Generally all physical attributes, but as mentioned, these are usually reflected by the type of striker, although you may have a strong target man, but also a more technical target man; each will have a particular preference as how they like to receive the ball, IE to head, to chest, to feet.
  • Mental: must be able to read the game and time runs onto through balls to perfection. Off the ball, anticipation and composure are important – without these a striker may struggle to make a sustained impact on a game. Bravery and determination are also important, as well as concentration. A striker who is willing to put his head or foot where others may not could well be the difference between scoring or not.
  • Technical: shooting, long shots, heading, first touch and technique should be the focus here. Aerial ability will give a distinct advantage against opposition centrehalves and cause problems from set pieces. A striker who can dribble can cause havoc for opposing defences, so this can be a useful technique to utilise.

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Do you have more 'general' training, as i am just too 'bored' to assign each and every little muppet to a training schedule.

Much happier to assign say...GK, attacking players, defensive players, youth, Youth GK.

Am I the only one? :(

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Hey SA, thanks for the schedule, have implemented it for my current season. I had the team start on it once they got back from holidays. I really think the Pre Season 2 was excellent, kept the team on that up until about a week/10 days before first League fixture. From there just put everyone else into their respective schedules. I dare say though that I am not following it necessarily how you intended people to. Eg I put my AM, into AM skills and then next month put them into AM Skills 2 and then back and forth etc.

I appreciate the efforts you have put in

cheers tel

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Generally you can say that the numbered schedules (EGs: GK 2, FB Tactics 2, W Skills 2, CF Shooting 3 etc etc) are biased towards more technically gifted players, whereas the non-numbered ones are more physically biased. For example, you may find the more physically biased schedules useful in the lower leagues where generally the quality of play is poorer than that of superior divisions. However, this is not strictly advised - look at what abilities each player has, his potential (from coach reports), his playing positions (natural and non-natural), and then decide a schedule which is the closest fit to that type of player.

1st class work regards Training Schedules, SA. Many thanks indeed. Just thought I’d add some comments to above post regarding lower leagues.

Having built up a squad of good players – but by no means exceptional (average CA 4.5*/PA 6*) – I have been using your FT & Yth schedules latest season in BSP (now in December) and found stats increases even for my older players (28-32 years), who are now getting increased CA and PA assessments from coaches & scouts.

I tend to swap schedules for individual players, e.g. FB Tactics/FB Tactics 2, with reference to Training Levels graphs, i.e. more or less of an aspect as required, but without fundamentally changing the schedules, and it works well. The only adjustments I did make were to reduce the physical training aspects so that the Workload slider now sits a notch below Medium on all schedules, which seems to keep the players happy with their schedules overall, although some would undoubtedly still be happy with the slider at Medium.

Also found it very useful with multi-position players to vary schedules to their different positions from time to time, e.g. FB Tactics/DM Skills/CH Tactics, etc.

Once again, great work.

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Do you have more 'general' training, as i am just too 'bored' to assign each and every little muppet to a training schedule.

Much happier to assign say...GK, attacking players, defensive players, youth, Youth GK.

Am I the only one?

A few years ago I was of exactly the same opinion: basically used area rather than position-specific schedules, EG: GK, defence, midfield, attack etc. Schedules are not difficult to build, once you've built a few from scratch you can usually see areas you can improve in the existing schedules, and then either modify the existing ones or create a new set to target specific playing categories.

Thats quite some effort you've put in there SA.

Perhaps add the above text into the readme file as well, but thats your call.

Thanks

Thanks, yeah that was from a post I made a while back, fortunately I'd saved the majority of it to my desktop. Since the post that contained the original article was lost when the forums switched over to vBulletin (what we're using now), just decided to tweak it a bit and repost. I'd happily add it to the readme, but I'd half to spend about half an hour removing all the vBulletin code from it! :D

Hey SA, thanks for the schedule, have implemented it for my current season. I had the team start on it once they got back from holidays. I really think the Pre Season 2 was excellent, kept the team on that up until about a week/10 days before first League fixture. From there just put everyone else into their respective schedules. I dare say though that I am not following it necessarily how you intended people to. Eg I put my AM, into AM skills and then next month put them into AM Skills 2 and then back and forth etc.

I appreciate the efforts you have put in

cheers tel

Have a look at the players current and potential playing positions under his profile. If they can play as say, a winger, then introduce a month's winger training into his schedule, IE rotating between AM and W Skills for example. Its entirely upto you how far you want to take the training.

1st class work regards Training Schedules, SA. Many thanks indeed. Just thought I’d add some comments to above post regarding lower leagues.

Having built up a squad of good players – but by no means exceptional (average CA 4.5*/PA 6*) – I have been using your FT & Yth schedules latest season in BSP (now in December) and found stats increases even for my older players (28-32 years), who are now getting increased CA and PA assessments from coaches & scouts.

I tend to swap schedules for individual players, e.g. FB Tactics/FB Tactics 2, with reference to Training Levels graphs, i.e. more or less of an aspect as required, but without fundamentally changing the schedules, and it works well. The only adjustments I did make were to reduce the physical training aspects so that the Workload slider now sits a notch below Medium on all schedules, which seems to keep the players happy with their schedules overall, although some would undoubtedly still be happy with the slider at Medium.

Also found it very useful with multi-position players to vary schedules to their different positions from time to time, e.g. FB Tactics/DM Skills/CH Tactics, etc.

Once again, great work.

Cheers :thup:

That's interesting because when I worked on a couple of lower league games a while back, the training was very difficult to influence at that level of football, probably becuase of the lack of quality in the training facilities, the fact that many players were on part-time contracts (and wouldn't change over to full-time contracts that were offered :mad:), the poorer quality of coaching staff, and so on. Although this was probably under 8.0.1 so that may explain a few things :D

The only times I see players that are unhappy with training schedules now is when youth players tend to be put onto the full time schedules when they've recently signed professional deals. First team players are more likely to complain if they're unhappy with learning a new position than the overall intensity of the training schedule they're currently assigned to.

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Hey SA, as you have done some fairly extensive research regarding training, I hope you won't mind answering these questions.

Through reading your analysis of position based training schedules, then looking and using your schedules and then assessing my players, I have begun dabbling in my own training schedules.

So my question is, when in the training screen players that have a just a dash in areas, say aerobic and strength, do you assume that to mean that there is no improvement?

I would assume yes and as such it would then pose other questions, as to whether a dash, is

a. just maintaining current level, which then leads to

b. that the player is just cruising along and as such the training needs to be amped up to allow further increases in attributes or

b. the players has peaked and as such no amount of training will see improvement.

My reason for enquiring is I have a player/striker. . whose form so far this season is consistently 7's, 8's, and as such I am thinking of increasing his training to keep match with his form. I think he has the ability ( I don't use have any 3rd party software Genie etc.) and think that if his training stays the same then the chances are his form will drop away

Does my idea have any merit?

cheers, tel

PS: I would also welcome thoughts from others

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Ok i thought i'd give these schedules a try, i'm managing Oldham currently in the championship i've improved my training facilities, so there pretty decent and i have high stars for all aspects of training, when i saw how in depth these training schedules were i was impressed and thought jeez these must be good. Thanks to genie scout i have alot of young raw talent, at the moment there no where near there potential.

So i'd been usiing these schedules for approximatly 3 seasons, but i was getting alarmed at how my young talent doesn't seem to be improving much even though there getting games regularly, so i decided to take an in depth look at how they are doing in training, and i've noticed only one or two players have improved stats slightly but some have just stayed the same, the worst is most have actually decreased stats in the areas vital for there position.

I dont mean to flame, as obviously quite alot of work has gone into it, i've made schedules in the past but mainly blindly trying to give as much training in the attributes the player i feel needs for his position, but because of my raw talent i really wanted to download a schedule from someone who obviously knows what they are doing to improve my players as quick as possible.

Unfortunatly these schedules have to go down as the biggest waste of time ever, 3 seasons for players with PA over 170+, CA is around 100 when i bought them, and there still the same.

So the search continues to find a schedule that will get the most out of my players.

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Hey SA, as you have done some fairly extensive research regarding training, I hope you won't mind answering these questions.

Through reading your analysis of position based training schedules, then looking and using your schedules and then assessing my players, I have begun dabbling in my own training schedules.

So my question is, when in the training screen players that have a just a dash in areas, say aerobic and strength, do you assume that to mean that there is no improvement?

I would assume yes and as such it would then pose other questions, as to whether a dash, is

a. just maintaining current level, which then leads to

b. that the player is just cruising along and as such the training needs to be amped up to allow further increases in attributes or

b. the players has peaked and as such no amount of training will see improvement.

My reason for enquiring is I have a player/striker. . whose form so far this season is consistently 7's, 8's, and as such I am thinking of increasing his training to keep match with his form. I think he has the ability ( I don't use have any 3rd party software Genie etc.) and think that if his training stays the same then the chances are his form will drop away

Does my idea have any merit?

cheers, tel

PS: I would also welcome thoughts from others

The overview and the schedules themselves are merely building-blocks / stepping-stones / foundations (whichever you call them); they are intended to get the ball and rolling, and as in your case, encourage you to build your own dependent upon the types of player in your squad. Training can be as simple or as complicated as you want it to be: the greater the amount of time you spend with allocation of schedules, generally you can say that the greater the likelihood of attribute change (be it positive or negative).

As for the "show attribute change" setting, from what I understand the dash indicates no current change at that particular point in time. As the attributes can either be static, unaffected, or dynamic (or semi states of these areas), as you mention, it is upto you to decide whether a change in schedule is required or not. Perhaps consider rotating schedules for fixed / variable amounts of time, EG schedule A @ month X, month Y, and then schedule B @ month Z, and then rotate. Think about the type of player in question and come to the conclusion which schedules he requires in order to at least maintain his current attribute settings, but which may potentially improve his current situation through competitive match experience, not only training.

As for changing the intensity settings, well logically if a player is approaching the end of a campaign after playing say, 40+ competitive matches of various quality, then perhaps a reduction in say, physically-biased training elements is required in order to prevent areas such as burnout / jadedness etc, although factors such as age, morale, physical condition, injury proneness, form, managerial praise / criticism, coaching ability, training facility quality for example can be influencing factors.

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Ok i thought i'd give these schedules a try, i'm managing Oldham currently in the championship i've improved my training facilities, so there pretty decent and i have high stars for all aspects of training, when i saw how in depth these training schedules were i was impressed and thought jeez these must be good. Thanks to genie scout i have alot of young raw talent, at the moment there no where near there potential.

So i'd been usiing these schedules for approximatly 3 seasons, but i was getting alarmed at how my young talent doesn't seem to be improving much even though there getting games regularly, so i decided to take an in depth look at how they are doing in training, and i've noticed only one or two players have improved stats slightly but some have just stayed the same, the worst is most have actually decreased stats in the areas vital for there position.

I dont mean to flame, as obviously quite alot of work has gone into it, i've made schedules in the past but mainly blindly trying to give as much training in the attributes the player i feel needs for his position, but because of my raw talent i really wanted to download a schedule from someone who obviously knows what they are doing to improve my players as quick as possible.

Unfortunatly these schedules have to go down as the biggest waste of time ever, 3 seasons for players with PA over 170+, CA is around 100 when i bought them, and there still the same.

So the search continues to find a schedule that will get the most out of my players.

Thanks for the feedback. Believe me, positive, negative or indifferent feedback is welcomed, as long as it is constructive :D

I has similar experiences of negative training effects from the schedules when managing Halesowen Town. Just couldn't manage to improve stats regardless of how a schedule was designed. I'm assuming some of the following were relevant:

although factors such as age, morale, physical condition, injury proneness, form, managerial praise / criticism, coaching ability, training facility quality for example can be influencing factors.

This was applicable to not only the youth (exceptionally difficult to improve at such low levels of training / youth facilities, coach quality etc), but also the first team members, many (if not all) of which were on part-time contracts. In situations like this, I would recommend moving as many of your playing staff as possible onto full-time contracts in order for them to spend more time training (and giving up the day job :D), which may potentially allow for attribute development to occur. However, it is not only important to move the players onto full-time contracts, it is equally important to move the staff onto full-time contracts, otherwise they will only have limited time to train players and therefore the potential for change in attributes is somewhat restricted.

And as for your use of genie scout, well surely you should be able to directly see whenever a player is not improving to hit his potential ability, and at that point decide he requires a new schedule? Information contained on that scout tool should be able to spoonfeed you all the information you could ever want to know about a player's development. Make a few adjustments to the sliders if you feel something could be sacrificed in order to potentially assist a player's development in another area(s), its not difficult - you just sound a bit lazy tbh :)

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