PDA

View Full Version : Do you understand training on FM?



crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 16:02
I'll happily admit that I don't! Here follows a good old fashioned rant and a cry for help! :o

Every version, I have a go at creating my own schedules. I'm not one of those people who like to download things for FM. I want to make everything myself in terms of tactics and training. So, each version, I find myself furiously pushing sliders up and down, trying to find the perfect mix for different types of players. Half the time, I have no real idea what I'm doing, apart from the vague notion of what I want a certain type of player to be doing in his training schedule. I have no real idea what 'light', 'medium' and 'high' actually means in reality and how many clicks means what. The graphs are a total mystery to me - how am I supposed to tell anything with so many factors involved (coaches, training facilities, player personalities etc.)? I also have very little idea what effect, if any, my training schedules are having on my players. All in all, it's a bit of a mystery. I don't know how players develop, how they gain CA points, how their attributes change and why, and so on and so forth. Everything is just a best guess for me personally.

There has been a fair amount of speculation and theory going on regarding training schedules over the last couple of incarnations of FM on the tactics and training forum. To be quite honest, I simply see no evidence for the majority of the ideas involving 'clicks per attribute' or 'linear theory' and that kind of thing. My eyes glaze over. Aren't I supposed to be a football manager, rather than a mathematician?

Anyway, I'm crap at training. That's the fact I'm trying to establish here. I have no real idea what I'm doing. I know that I want to do it myself, I know which attributes I think are important for each position and so on and so forth, but the rest is just guess work. I have searched the internet high and low for a guide that might make sense to me. I have also looked for training schedules where someone has actually gone to the trouble of explaining how they work, so that I could download them and learn a little. However, what I normally find is just a thread saying 'download my training, it's great' and a few posts of some random players with a few green arrows in random attributes as 'evidence'.

Clearly, I need some help. So, whether you train for specialist positions, train individuals, or train for well rounded and 'complete' players, I would like to hear from you. Personally, I want to learn how others approach this much misunderstood area of the game. So please do share your opinions and thoughts on creating training schedules. What am I missing? What should I or shouldn't I be doing, in your opinion? Do you yourself understand what is going on or are you as clueless as me? Do you think SI need to overhaul this strange and unexplained part of the game? How do players' develop? Am I missing something simple? What difference does training make? These are just some of the questions that need answering! :D

dafuge
02-05-2011, 16:12
I've never read the guides on the T&T forum as I like to do things for myself, so I'm far from being an expert on this one. However, I set up my own schedules when the current module was introduced (FM06/07?) using common sense.

Firstly, I looked at each training category and made a note of the attributes it covered. Then, for every position, I listed the key attributes for that position including the ones that suited the way I played and ranked them in order. I then created a schedule for each position by choosing the weighting for each category by using the attribute lists I had created. I've tweaked the intensity a bit to keep players happy/fit but I'm still using basically the same original schedules I made years ago.

I've got no doubt that there is a more efficient way of doing it by learning about CA allocation and attribute weightings, but that wasn't what I wanted. I wanted to create something that made footballing sense rather than something that just worked well in the game. I suppose my way of creating tactics is similar.

Born2killzone
02-05-2011, 16:30
Basically I just look at a player, see what stats are important and what I think needs improving and focus on that. Usually I just stick all players in a certain position on the same sort of schedule.

If I'm feeling a little bit more hands on with a certain player I would select him, cycle through his training catagorys and look to see what he needs most. If like you said you know what attributes are most important then thats bassically all the knowlege you need.

Although, most players you do well just to maintain there stats or slightly improve them.

robertcornell68
02-05-2011, 16:35
My idea was to classify training as fast, strong & mixed, then attack, defence & mixed.

Then an MC is mixed, mixed and a winger fast, attack, etc.

Does it work? :confused:

crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 16:43
I've never read the guides on the T&T forum as I like to do things for myself, so I'm far from being an expert on this one. However, I set up my own schedules when the current module was introduced (FM06/07?) using common sense.

Firstly, I looked at each training category and made a note of the attributes it covered. Then, for every position, I listed the key attributes for that position including the ones that suited the way I played and ranked them in order. I then created a schedule for each position by choosing the weighting for each category by using the attribute lists I had created. I've tweaked the intensity a bit to keep players happy/fit but I'm still using basically the same original schedules I made years ago.

I've got no doubt that there is a more efficient way of doing it by learning about CA allocation and attribute weightings, but that wasn't what I wanted. I wanted to create something that made footballing sense rather than something that just worked well in the game. I suppose my way of creating tactics is similar.

I've done pretty much the same Dafuge, to be honest. I work in a similar way. Check the attributes for each position and/or role, match them against the training sections, and then generally move the sliders to match what I think is best. Bearing in mind that I have no real measurement of what 'light', 'medium' or 'high' really means.

It's the little things though that confuse me. For example, the defending training section includes the attribute 'concentration' as well as tackling and marking. At a first glance, you might say to yourself, 'right, my forward doesn't need to do any defending training, as I'm not interested in him tackling or marking really'. Then, you look again, and see that 'concentration' is also involved in that section, which, as far as I can tell, is something applicable to every player. Now I've got to give my striker at least some defending training. Examples like that always confuse me.

Plus, there is the fact that I don't really know what 'light' training means. Does that mean the player is going to generally maintain his level, training maybe a couple of times a week, or does it mean the player will lose attribute points in this area due to not training enough. Is my striker going to gain some concentration but then also gain tackling and marking? How does it work? :confused: On the good player forum, I saw a thread where someone had trained a young striker but left defending training at zero (presumably he reached the conclusion that defending training isn't needed for a striker as he doesn't want to increase tackling and marking). The result was a huge drop in concentration from a fairly decent rating to barely anything, which is a bit of a worry, because I understand concentration to apply to all players in the same way as consistency but in a 'micro-sense' on a move-by-move basis.

Born2killzone
02-05-2011, 16:47
I dont think strikers need concentration. Not in the FM world anyway. And probably not so much in real life really. Concentration is vital in defenders but its more composure in strikers.

My second best striker this season has 2 for concentration. My first best striker and the best in the league has 8.

crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 16:51
Don't know if you are right or not there Born2killzone.

This is the SI definition of concentration:

Concentration
How well the player concentrates on a move-by-move basis during a match (this is “consistency” during a match on a move by move basis).


And the SI definition of composure:

Composure
How well the player reacts to a “pressure situation” in a match – a player would have a high composure rating if he were able to consistently score when being through on goal in the last minute or a defender would have a low composure rating if he hoofs the ball away when under no pressure.


With both suggesting that they are relevant to all players.

Composure puts us in a similar situation to that of concentration because that comes under 'shooting' training.

Born2killzone
02-05-2011, 16:58
Exactly. They say that but put composure in shooting training and concentration in defending training. Contradict their selves maybe.

I've never actually read their definations. Is there a link to that?

You can tell on the ME when a goal was conceded because of concentration. Thats why I started making sure all defenders have high concentratioin. I'm pretty sure when compusure effected a goal being scored too.

crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 17:03
There may be a link but I don't know of it.

These are just my notes of what different attributes mean (they are official definitions as far as I am aware though).

Fabio MVP
02-05-2011, 17:03
Exactly. They say that but put composure in shooting training and concentration in defending training. Contradict their selves maybe.

I've never actually read their definations. Is there a link to that?

You can tell on the ME when a goal was conceded because of concentration. Thats why I started making sure all defenders have high concentratioin. I'm pretty sure when compusure effected a goal being scored too.
http://www.footballmanager.com/manual/171

Marsupian
02-05-2011, 17:11
Low concentration can really hurt a striker. To make that perfect move at the right time to get at the end of that throughball you need to be concentrating. Composure is also very important for defenders as you want them to keep it cool when they get under a lot of pressure instead of just hoofing the ball away and give the opponent possession or even a corner.

As far as the training goes I have a feeling that everyone is just drawing out schedules that look good for a specific player/position/role and hardly anyone out there is counting clicks or feeling like they have got that "perfect" slider position. I think that the higher the slider setting the more CA is pushed to attributes in that category and a lower slider setting gives those attributes less CA or might even free up some CA for other attributes that have a higher slider setting. If this is correct (or the general idea is correct) than there is no perfect slider setting and you should just use the sliders to shape the players into how you think they should be attribute wise.

In the end the most important part about training is keeping your players fit and give them game time. That will make players gain or lose attributes. The sliders just make some attributes more likely to go up or down.

btw. I could be totally wrong as far as the training goes and maybe there is some way to calculate perfect slider settings to make attributes go up but I'm very skeptical and this approach seems to work just fine. It's also more of a "manager" approach, do I wan't my midfielders to train a bit more on ball control or on tactics? That's a question a manager should be able to answer without having a maths degree :P.

michaeltmurrayuk
02-05-2011, 17:13
I do nearly what dafuge does - training schedule per position or role, then check to see what each training area covers and using the player roles which attributes are key for each role.

Intensity wise I try to keep the overall intentsity about 3/4 full, and setting the key area(s) as close to high as I can, other areas on medium and the not important ones on light. I'll then tweak this depending on the players.

With FM2011 I'll also stick players on an individual area if one area really needs improving, on past versions I'd increase that area in the hopes the attribute I'm after would improve.

Regarding light, medium and high - the higher the intensity the quicker their attributes will increase, however you also increase the chance of injury and as far as I am aware the more tired the player will be.

There's also another thing I've noticed that is different with FM2011 and thats that the training attribute graphs now show a continous value instead of going straight from 8 to 9 which lets you know the player is improving but just not another to up the attribute yet.

Born2killzone
02-05-2011, 17:15
Thanks. I do remember reading that now, I think one year it was printed in the instructions.

Reading that though concentration is more of a defensive thing. Losing focus and Making costly mistakes and stuff.


I dont agree determination and workrate should be locked though. Thats more of an attitude and a good manager should be able to give his players a better attitude.

Cougar2010
02-05-2011, 17:26
Personally I think the basics of training are fairly easy Crouch.

A player gains CA points by playing well, other things help but by far match experience is the most important factor, second I believe is to have a coaches workload at light.

These CA points are then distributed to attributes based on your training schedules - So if you have "Attacking" at a high level compared to other sections more CA points will be distributed to the attributes in that section whereas if all the areas are level then you'll see an even distribution of the CA points earned.

Of course the distribution of CA points into attributes isn't one for one as attributes are weighted. Once an attribute tips over from say 11.9 to 12.0 you see an increase in the players profile in the form of an arrow.

As for coaches well they affect the re-distribution of CA points so with an unbalanced schedule over time the attributes in the areas trained the least will drop opening up CA points that are re-distributed to the areas you train the most. How fast this happens depends on how good your coaches are.

Bababui
02-05-2011, 20:11
I dont think strikers need concentration. Not in the FM world anyway. And probably not so much in real life really. Concentration is vital in defenders but its more composure in strikers.

My second best striker this season has 2 for concentration. My first best striker and the best in the league has 8.

In real football, strikers do need to defend. In the fictional world of FM we see many a FMer use poachers whereas IRL virtually no top club use them. So, to make things more 'real', I look for strikers who have better defensive ratings and train them in defending.

crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 20:47
In real football, strikers do need to defend. In the fictional world of FM we see many a FMer use poachers whereas IRL virtually no top club use them. So, to make things more 'real', I look for strikers who have better defensive ratings and train them in defending.

What about Javier Hernandez, Diego Milito, Miroslav Klose, Jermain Defoe etc.? Just a few off the top of my head. Still quite a few poachers around. Obviously slightly rarer these days though at the top clubs.

I'm not sure modern forwards need a lot of defensive training in FM terms either. Modern forwards, typically lone strikers, tend to be more athletic etc., cover more ground, contribute to more phases of play and so on. I'm not sure they need a lot of training in marking and tackling though! Forwards are generally restricted in defensive terms to pressing and closing down. There are probably exceptions but you don't really see a lot of forwards getting stuck into tackles or tight marking their opponents. They're more likely to use their athleticism and fitness to cover more ground, press higher and deeper, and to make more interceptions though. That's how I see it.

Bababui
02-05-2011, 20:49
What about Javier Hernandez, Diego Milito, Miroslav Klose, Jermain Defoe etc.? Just a few off the top of my head. Still quite a few poachers around. Obviously slightly rarer these days though at the top clubs.

I'm not sure modern forwards need a lot of defensive training in FM terms either. Modern forwards, typically lone strikers, tend to be more athletic etc., cover more ground, contribute to more phases of play and so on. I'm not sure they need training in marking and tackling! Forwards are generally restricted in defensive terms to pressing and closing down. There are probably exceptions but you don't really see a lot of forwards getting stuck into tackles or tight marking their opponents. They're more likely to use their athleticism and fitness to cover more ground, press higher and deeper, and to make more interceptions though. That's how I see it.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/blog/2009/jan/22/the-question-jonathan-wilson-goalpoachers?commentpage=3#start-of-comments

Check out this article. ;)

crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 21:00
Yeah, I've read a lot of Jonathan Wilson. I don't always agree with his conclusions, to be honest.

I was a big fan of JW for some time. I love the book Inverting the Pyramid and regularly log on to read his Guardian articles. However, JW is so absolutely obsessed with the 'death' of the 4-4-2 and the 'rise' of the 4-2-3-1 that I find reading his articles frustrating now.

It doesn't really answer any of my points above but I understand why you brought it up and, yes, I agree, it's a trend in modern football.

Bababui
02-05-2011, 21:06
Yeah, I've read a lot of Jonathan Wilson. I don't always agree with his conclusions, to be honest.

I was a big fan of JW for some time. I love the book Inverting the Pyramid and regularly log on to read his Guardian articles. However, JW is so absolutely obsessed with the 'death' of the 4-4-2 and the 'rise' of the 4-2-3-1 that I find reading his articles frustrating now.

It doesn't really answer any of my points above but I understand why you brought it up and, yes, I agree, it's a trend in modern football.

I dont really disagree with your earlier post..just wanted to add a little more to think about. Theoretical discussions really arent about black and white issues.

In more general terms, with lower league FM players, I prefer guys who have evenly distributed attributes...like some MFers who seemingly have almost all 8's. They seem to produce more. And they are able to contribute to both the offensive and defensive.

crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 22:04
I dont really disagree with your earlier post..just wanted to add a little more to think about. Theoretical discussions really arent about black and white issues.

I genuinely think there is still a place in the game for pure consumers. That's my opinion anyway.

With Jonathan Wilson, I tend to have a few little niggles, although I generally enjoy his writing overall. He seems set on this whole 'death of 4-4-2', 'death of the poacher' and evolution to some 'perfect' game, which I just find misleading and inaccurate. For example, with the 4-4-2 formation, he seems to entirely ignore the fact that 4-4-2 is still by far the most popular formation choice in England (from the top flight down right down the league system) and that it is still the second most popular choice in the top flight leagues of both Italy and Spain (two countries where 4-3-1-2 and 4-2-3-1 tend to dominate respectively). In addition to this, the fact that the most popular playing system in Italy is the 4-3-1-2 (a variation on 4-4-2) totally escapes him and he has even gone so far as to claim that the diamond formation is inherently flawed in his past analysis. JW seems absolutely determined that 4-4-2 be consigned to the rubbish heap alongside anything remotely connected to British football generally.

Sometimes I dislike this tendency to reduce football to numbers as if there is some kind of simple equation to football tactics, where 4-5-1 beats 3-5-2 beats 4-4-2 as JW seems to want you to believe. The reality is surely quite different though, otherwise the whole world would simply have abandoned the 4-4-2 and switched to a 4-5-1 variation.

Surely the majority of football fans understand that not all systems are the same and that, even in a 4-4-2 formation, some players who are playing in the same band have deeper or higher roles than some of their team-mates in the same band? Surely we all understand that football is a dynamic game where certain areas of the field can also be defended or attacked dynamically.

Having said that, it's really pleasing that the likes of JW are finally giving us some tactical analysis of games, which is something that has been hugely lacking in English/British football coverage in the past. I have nothing but praise from that point of view. However, I get a bit fed up of the emphasis on static positions, numbers, 'tactical evolution', the 'death' of 4-4-2 etc.


In more general terms, with lower league FM players, I prefer guys who have evenly distributed attributes...like some MFers who seemingly have almost all 8's. They seem to produce more. And they are able to contribute to both the offensive and defensive.

When I'm managing in the lower leagues, I always find the poacher a perfect choice up front. If you have a player with decent speed and an ability to put the ball in the net, you can do really well, even if the rest of his game is a little ropey. It's a bit of a cliché in the English lower leagues to say that every side is looking for a goalscorer, someone 'who can put the ball in the back of the net'.

Anyway, you'll find me going way off topic as this thread is supposed to be about training! :D Interesting discussion though but probably something for another thread in the tactics forum maybe! :)

Bababui
02-05-2011, 22:13
Crouchaldinho..loved reading the post but I dont feel well qualified to add or quibble with anything. Ill expect you to consistently keep up the quality of your posts if you want a place in the first team. :p

JW did seem to say that the death of the poacher had to do with the one-dimensional role of the position, if I remember correctly? Wouldnt it be like playing 10 1/2 men against a 11?

crouchaldinho
02-05-2011, 22:45
Crouchaldinho..loved reading the post but I dont feel well qualified to add or quibble with anything. Ill expect you to consistently keep up the quality of your posts if you want a place in the first team. :p

I'll try. :p

Think I'm quite a long way off the first-team status though. Merely a reserve at the moment! :D

You'll find me mostly posting in the tactics forum or the career updates section. :thup:


JW did seem to say that the death of the poacher had to do with the one-dimensional role of the position, if I remember correctly? Wouldnt it be like playing 10 1/2 men against a 11?

JW is more or less arguing for the more physical, athletic strikers, who combine technique and power, and contribute more in terms of all round play. He is saying that it's not enough to simply be a goalscorer any more, simply a focal point of the attack with the main job of putting the ball in the back of the net.

This is all about philosophy though, I guess. In FM terms, whether you are more 'rigid' or 'fluid'. I guess I would tend towards the more rigid side as I have specific ideas about the tactical roles of my players (I mostly play rigid philosophy on FM btw). I guess I'm also someone who believes in individuality, to an extent anyway.

Personally, while I understand the theory behind deploying multi-functional forwards, I can't help but feel that if another top 'poacher' comes along, as good as some of the great names mentioned in the other thread, then surely he would find a place playing at the top level. After all, the art of scoring goals is something that you are born with and doing it as well as any player that we might describe as a 'poacher' is a pretty rare commodity.

Lazaru5
03-05-2011, 11:54
To bring the thread back on topic my training schedules tend to vary depending on the club I'm at, the league we're in and the quality of the training/youth facilities.

I like linear... and find that balancing it just so results in lots of "happy with his training schedule" as opposed to pleased/content or worse.. I find that "happy" appears to relate to how hard they train and how quickly they improve and that the less happy they are the less work they put in in training. This is assuming that the "Training Level Progress: Overall" graph relates to how hard they players are working in training which I believe it does.

Initially in a save my training schedules will be positional rather than individual with only those who need a specific schedule being given an individual one. As my team progress through the leagues/the quality of player improves/the facilities and coaches get better then I'll gradually create an individual schedule for every player. The individual schedules tend to focus more on the attributes I need the players to have in the roles they play in my team rather than anything else. The roles my players have don't seem to correspond with any of the pre-defined roles (I use classic tactics) so I train them to play the roles as defined in my tactics.

Potential WK's get in-depth focus on the specific attributes required to eventually make them "World-Class" in their natural position(s) - which is something that I have reasonable success with - and older players get schedules designed to maintain their fitness and technical skills which again I have reasonable success with later in the game, regularly playing 34/35 year old players in top teams for example.

Basically my training schedules reflect my 'status' in the game (lower league = more general; higher league = more individual)

crouchaldinho
03-05-2011, 11:59
How do you know the specific attributes required to make a player 'world class' in their position? Care to share! ;)

Lazaru5
03-05-2011, 12:05
How do you know the specific attributes required to make a player 'world class' in their position? Care to share! ;)

it's pretty standard crouchy, defensive attributes for defenders, attacking attributes for attackers, goalkeeping attributes for keepers... you get the idea ;)

Cougar2010
03-05-2011, 12:06
How do you know the specific attributes required to make a player 'world class' in their position? Care to share! ;)

If you use the tactics creator crouch it highlights the key attributes for a role/position.

BigShane
03-05-2011, 13:19
older players get schedules designed to maintain their fitness and technical skills which again I have reasonable success with later in the game, regularly playing 34/35 year old players in top teams for example.

I'd like to know how you achieve this. Lowering the overall intensity? Upping the intensity? Switching time spent on mental traits to physical/technique? Ensuring rest days?

Give us a hint!

crouchaldinho
03-05-2011, 13:44
Cheers guys. I thought when Lazaru said about specific attributes, he knew some combinations of attributes which gave the label 'world class' to a certain type of player. That's what I was driving at.

Ackter
03-05-2011, 13:48
I do, but I ignore it.

General training schedules are all I use.

crouchaldinho
03-05-2011, 14:11
You don't feel that you are potentially harming your players' development by not creating any customised schedules then Ackter?

Ackter
03-05-2011, 14:16
Nope. They'll still hit their best if you play them.

Training is more about directing development really.

crouchaldinho
03-05-2011, 14:28
So you don't end up with quite a lot of generic looking players then?

Isn't it better to have specialised training so that you can direct their development and 'shape' the player's attributes?

milnerpoint
03-05-2011, 14:31
i must admit im like Ackter, i use the bog standard training the game starts with, always have done ive never been 100% certain changing anything makes a big difference, i have messed around with it more in this version but yet to see any good rewards for it. As Ackter says if they players play well they seem to develop anyway. I think good coaches are more important than custom schedules, hiring better coaches and having better facilities is when i notice a change.

Ackter
03-05-2011, 14:33
So you don't end up with quite a lot of generic looking players then?

Isn't it better to have specialised training so that you can direct their development and 'shape' the player's attributes?

I do use the individual training thingy from the player profile, but I never venture into training itself.

I still have a massive array of different types of players, theyve just been allowed to develop mostly naturally.

Ackter
03-05-2011, 14:35
Best way to get a player to develop well is simply play them regularly from as young as possible.

If you leave it past 22 theyll struggle to hit their peak - they'll still get close but youll be stuck with a player who takes 8 years to develop instead of 3.

Cougar2010
03-05-2011, 14:37
So you don't end up with quite a lot of generic looking players then?

Isn't it better to have specialised training so that you can direct their development and 'shape' the player's attributes?

I've always used separate schedules for GK, DC, fullbacks, MCs, Wingers & strikers.

I've been rather lazy this version as there are standard schedules for defenders, midfielders & attackers but this is partly due to not staying at a particular club more than three seasons. Once I feel I've settled into a club I'll probably set up more schedules, key missing ones being fullbacks & wingers. That said if I come across a player who is particularly unbalanced or lacking in one or two attributes I would create a specific schedule just for him.

Lazaru5
03-05-2011, 15:42
I'd like to know how you achieve this. Lowering the overall intensity? Upping the intensity? Switching time spent on mental traits to physical/technique? Ensuring rest days?

Give us a hint!

Yes.


Cheers guys. I thought when Lazaru said about specific attributes, he knew some combinations of attributes which gave the label 'world class' to a certain type of player. That's what I was driving at.

There are... sufficiently high values in key/core attributes for a particular position = World Class - or so I've always been led to believe. It is the formula I use when developing schedules for my young starlets and I have produced "World Class" players from youth in every position on the pitch at least once in the last few years. I conclude from that that I must be doing *something* right (or it's too easy?)

Coentrao
03-05-2011, 16:28
All my schedules have strength and aerobic training on the first slider "break" except for wingers and strikers who have a little more focus on aerobic training, every position have intense tactics training and then depending on the position i tweaked the sliders to the areas relevant to that position.

To players that need a particular boost on a physical area i'll use the individual focus, it works quite fast with strength and while it takes longer with pace it seems to be effective as well.

And during the pre-season i have every player on intensive physical and tactical training as well.

crouchaldinho
03-05-2011, 19:09
Is there a good guide to PPMs around? Anyone know of one?

That's something else I'd like to learn: how to get more from my players with the right PPMs.

Ackter
03-05-2011, 19:15
No point - theyll reject pretty much everything you suggest.

Just do whatever your assistant recommend as they'll actually listen then.

Sunlock
03-05-2011, 19:48
I never touch it tbh...I had the same problem once...what I did was skipping it entirely. Focus on having at least 3 coaches with 17-20 in all cats. Then I auto, so I wont do a thing until I renew staff, or we play badly.

Then I follow the assistant throughout the season.

Bababui
03-05-2011, 19:55
FM2011 automatically assigns your players to specific training categories anyway.

starburst91
03-05-2011, 20:08
barcelona have won the first 5 la ligas on my game and a champions league title, but the past couple of seasons they finished 5th and then 4th, and are currently 6th although its only september in the 2017/18 season. So yeh now there underpowered, but you never know might happen in real life. And you can't trust my save anyway, wigan are currently bottom of league 1 with a 10 point deduction and holland are 42nd in the world rankings.

Fabio MVP
03-05-2011, 20:43
barcelona have won the first 5 la ligas on my game and a champions league title, but the past couple of seasons they finished 5th and then 4th, and are currently 6th although its only september in the 2017/18 season. So yeh now there underpowered, but you never know might happen in real life. And you can't trust my save anyway, wigan are currently bottom of league 1 with a 10 point deduction and holland are 42nd in the world rankings.
http://community.sigames.com/showthread.php/264110-Barcelona-is-underpowered ?

BiggusD
03-05-2011, 23:35
When it comes to player development, I have some information/opinions that could be of use to others. I have made my own training programme as well and am happy with it, but I cannot say that it is better than anyone else's program or that it is "correct" in any way so all I have to say about that is that each position in my tactic (GK,CD, FB, DMC, AMRL and SC) is tweaked to have High workload on all key areas except the physical ones, but at the same time is training in every category (apart from GK for non-gk's of course). The overall workload is the click before High.

One important thing to note is that when you adjust the individual sliders to the left and into Light, the third click from zero you can see on the coaches workload bars that a training category suddenly get fewer players. This means that the two first clicks of Light are worthless since the schedule is then not actually training its players in that category.



Well, over to player development. Here the best tip is to click on a player's key attributes from time to time in order to see the minute changes to his development in that particular attribute over time. Those attributes that are flatlining aren't developing at all, and this means that no amount of Individual Training Focus on that attribute will change anything. Since ITF takes up time from his training schedule, use it only on attributes that you can see are fluctuating.

Furthermore, it may take a year for a talented player to raise an attribute a full point. This means that in order to see actual improvements in the ME, it is better to focus on attributes that are closer to get a raise, and then rather change it around more often.

Some attributes are flatlining at one point but when you check on the player later, the attribute i active again. I am in those situations quick to give that attribute ITF.

Players that show improvement in many areas are better off without ITF, as that may disrupt the fine development he is showing.