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jmknpk
02-12-2010, 07:02
I am still learning about the real life game of football. There are some things in the game that also happen in real-life that I don't understand. I have a couple questions.

First, I know that sometimes the game says that a player is "ticked off" by the official. I also just went to my half-time stats and see that a player is "in danger of being booked". I know that a yellow card is received for a foul, two yellows and the player gets a red and sent off. But I'm confused a bout the "ticked off" part. I know that when I watch a real-life game, the official writes something down on his card and they say he's been ticked off. How does that "ticked off" all work?

Second, I know this is not a big deal, but with my understanding it looks silly to me and I cannot make sense of it. When a ball goes out over the touch line, sometimes the player who knocks it out raises his hand as if to say "I'm the one who knocked it out, the ball goes to the opponents". But just as often it seems that a player raises his hand to indicate "It's our ball, the other team knocked it out". So I'm wondering if there's some nuance I'm not picking up on. If the hand is raised to admit sending the ball out and also to indicate that we should receive possession, then raising the hand seems to do no good. If the signal means two different things, how can you tell which time it means one and which the other? Can someone please explain this to me.

Sorry about such stupid questions, we don't get much football (soccer) exposure here in the US.

charlo116
02-12-2010, 07:29
Being ticked off is like when a referee takes note, usually mentally, of a player who's made a foul or a few fouls, and it basically means that if they were to committ another foul they are likely to get a yellow card for consistently fouling.

Usually players raise their hands to claim a throw-in, there aren't many players who would be honest enough to raise their hand to say they kicked it out. Most of the time if a player knows they've kicked it out they might just not say anything hoping that the referee or linesman makes a mistake. Most players are professional enough not to try and mislead the referee in that cirsumstance but most are not honest enought to say they put it out either.

aderow
02-12-2010, 07:57
Sorry about such stupid questions, we don't get much football (soccer) exposure here in the US.

You watch MLS?

Oh and if you have cable try and get fox soccer channel :thup:

And your question....charlo pretty much got it.

jmknpk
02-12-2010, 13:52
You watch MLS?

I have to admit I haven't watched much MLS. But I don't think I see it much. Mostly premier league or Serie A. I did see a friendly match between LA Galaxy and Australian Newcastle Jets that was pretty interesting a short while ago.

Thanks for the response on the questions.

jmknpk
03-12-2010, 00:08
Usually players raise their hands to claim a throw-in, there aren't many players who would be honest enough to raise their hand to say they kicked it out. Most of the time if a player knows they've kicked it out they might just not say anything hoping that the referee or linesman makes a mistake. Most players are professional enough not to try and mislead the referee in that cirsumstance but most are not honest enought to say they put it out either.

Your reply seems to make sense, and was kind of what I was thinking was the way it should be. But I have been watching full matches of my FM 2011 games. There are situations where it is blatantly obvious that a player knocked the ball over the touch line. He then raises his hand and walks away from the location in the direction he'd be preparing for the other team to throw it in. It definitely does not seem to me that he is trying to get the referee to rule in his favor. This situation still puzzles me.

Coentrao
03-12-2010, 00:26
Well i must admit i never paid attention to that happening in the game(the detail with the hands) but IRL when a player tries a pass and it goes off bounds he raises his hand to his teammate like saying that it was his fault.

Unless you are saying that is a total deliberate ball that went out of touch.. in that case i don't really know unless it was giving the ball back after an injury stoppage or something.

Carmi88
03-12-2010, 02:42
i always thought when refs were writing in their book it would be the kit number followed by a reason. incase its something like a straight red and needs a further report after games, no idea though xD

charlo116
03-12-2010, 03:11
i always thought when refs were writing in their book it would be the kit number followed by a reason. incase its something like a straight red and needs a further report after games, no idea though xD

i think they would have to record the number of a player who gets booked and when they get booked.

jmknpk
04-12-2010, 11:07
Ah thanks guys! Those explanations make sense to me.

phnompenhandy
04-12-2010, 13:52
Yeh, 'ticked off' = scolded; a verbal warning. "Next time you're in the book, son".

The second point is a really irritating habit of players in real life. It's like a Pavlovian response - the hand goes up to claim "Our ball" every time, even when it's blatantly obvious they kicked it out. I regard it as a form of cheating and would like FIFA/UEFA to stamp it out by booking players who do it. Anyway, it is amusing to see my little 3D sprites doing it!